Olivia19191
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I am an EU student and I’m currently thinking about going to uni, starting 2020. I’m planning to do Business Management. However... Can anyone tell me what is the difference between BA Hons, and a foundation year in uni? Why do people prefer to do foundation year instead of moving on to BA Hons straight away? Is it because universities offer foundation year for students with lower grades? And BA Hons for students with better grades?
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verycoolperson
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yes foundation year is offered to a lot of students with lower grades than the entry requirements of that university, however i think theres also requirements for foundation year too, not sure though maybe someone else can clarify
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Emma1999_
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Foundation year reasons can vary some for lower entry requirements, others may not have a qual in the releated subject . My friend got AAA and did a foundation year because she wanted a gap year but wanted to be in education still . She did this , to try and get a good level of knowledge in studying for a degree and just to have more releaxed year.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Olivia19191)
I am an EU student and I’m currently thinking about going to uni, starting 2020. I’m planning to do Business Management. However... Can anyone tell me what is the difference between BA Hons, and a foundation year in uni? Why do people prefer to do foundation year instead of moving on to BA Hons straight away? Is it because universities offer foundation year for students with lower grades? And BA Hons for students with better grades?
A foundation year aims to bridge the gap between level 3 study and undergraduate study- it's aimed at people who haven't got good enough grades to move on to year 1 of the undergraduate course, or maybe people who didn't study the right subject at A-level.

For lots of unis, it's a way of generating extra income.

Some non-UK students will use a foundation year to get used to studying in English, but in general if you think you can get straight onto the undergrad course, this is the more usual route.
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Retired_Messiah
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Foundation years are designed for people who did badly in school. Don't take them unless you also did badly or are chronically under-confident in yourself.
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Realitysreflexx
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"For lot's of uni's it's a way of generating extra income"

So what are undergraduate courses then a cost center? 😂 😂

Really awkward statement, foundation years give people second sometimes third chances to go to university and are very positive. But should only be used when necessary.

People do foundation years also to go onto quite good RG universities due to sometimes being a grade off or having had a break from education.
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
A foundation year aims to bridge the gap between level 3 study and undergraduate study- it's aimed at people who haven't got good enough grades to move on to year 1 of the undergraduate course, or maybe people who didn't study the right subject at A-level.

For lots of unis, it's a way of generating extra income.

Some non-UK students will use a foundation year to get used to studying in English, but in general if you think you can get straight onto the undergrad course, this is the more usual route.
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Realitysreflexx
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Wow another loaded foundation year attack...

I did a foundation year and went to a RG.

So it's not only for people with bad grades, it can also be used by people who have certificates that aren't accepted for UK study.. Such as my US highschool Diploma.
(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
Foundation years are designed for people who did badly in school. Don't take them unless you also did badly or are chronically under-confident in yourself.
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Retired_Messiah
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Wow another loaded foundation year attack...

I did a foundation year and went to a RG.

So it's not only for people with bad grades, it can also be used by people who have certificates that aren't accepted for UK study.. Such as my US highschool Diploma.
I did not realise that foundation years were how unis fixed foreign qualification incompatibilities. It wasn't an attack.

Not sure what the Russell Group has to do with anything.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
"For lot's of uni's it's a way of generating extra income"

So what are undergraduate courses then a cost center? 😂 😂

Really awkward statement, foundation years give people second sometimes third chances to go to university and are very positive. But should only be used when necessary.

People do foundation years also to go onto quite good RG universities due to sometimes being a grade off or having had a break from education.
Interesting you felt the need to mess up the punctuation in my statement.

It's an extra year of fees from the student- if you can get 4 years of fees from a student, rather than 3, at a time of lowering student numbers, that's extra money. In general, foundation years often have large classes and are relatively cheap to run- especially if you compare a science foundation degree against the undegrad, often there's less lab time etc, which is a big expense for unis.

To be clear, I'm not saying foundation years are bad for everyone, and for some people they are the right choice- especially if you've changed your mind about the career you want between choosing your A-levels and going to uni.

Equally, last results day saw lots of unis offering very near miss students a place on their foundation years. Now, maybe for some students this is the right option, but many of those students might be better served by going to their insurance choice and doing a 3 year degree or finding a place in clearing. To me, this suggests some unis are perhaps using their foundation years in a cynical way to get extra fees from students. And yes, in general, I am cynical about the ways unis behave these days.

It's also worth bearing in mind that not all foundation years guarantee progression to an undergrad degree at the same uni, even if you pass the year. Other institutions are often skeptical of another uni's program and this can leave students a bit high and dry.
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Realitysreflexx
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Has to do with the fact you eluded to only people with bad grades and me providing you evidence that in fact it is possible that foundation can be completed with good results and lead to good universities.
(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
I did not realise that foundation years were how unis fixed foreign qualification incompatibilities. It wasn't an attack.

Not sure what the Russell Group has to do with anything.
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Realitysreflexx
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I'll agree universities do use some aggressive tactics.

But let's not dismiss all foundation years. They can be lifesavers and yield to good outcomes. All I'm trying to stress.
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Interesting you felt the need to mess up the punctuation in my statement.

It's an extra year of fees from the student- if you can get 4 years of fees from a student, rather than 3, at a time of lowering student numbers, that's extra money. In general, foundation years often have large classes and are relatively cheap to run- especially if you compare a science foundation degree against the undegrad, often there's less lab time etc, which is a big expense for unis.

To be clear, I'm not saying foundation years are bad for everyone, and for some people they are the right choice- especially if you've changed your mind about the career you want between choosing your A-levels and going to uni.

Equally, last results day saw lots of unis offering very near miss students a place on their foundation years. Now, maybe for some students this is the right option, but many of those students might be better served by going to their insurance choice and doing a 3 year degree or finding a place in clearing. To me, this suggests some unis are perhaps using their foundation years in a cynical way to get extra fees from students. And yes, in general, I am cynical about the ways unis behave these days.

It's also worth bearing in mind that not all foundation years guarantee progression to an undergrad degree at the same uni, even if you pass the year. Other institutions are often skeptical of another uni's program and this can leave students a bit high and dry.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
I'll agree universities do use some aggressive tactics.

But let's not dismiss all foundation years. They can be lifesavers and yield to good outcomes. All I'm trying to stress.
I agree that they can be great for some people- if you're in the situation where you need one for whatever reason, they can be a really good option. However, if you're likely to get a place at a uni you like without one, then it's unlikely you'd benefit from doing one.

Personally, I think it's always worth weighing up the benefits a foundation year can give you against the costs of spending an additional year at uni- especially as this year could equally be used for an integrated masters, year abroad or placement year.
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Retired_Messiah
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Has to do with the fact you eluded to only people with bad grades and me providing you evidence that in fact it is possible that foundation can be completed with good results and lead to good universities.
It's you that's inserting the quality of universities into this mate. You've taken this thread far more personally than you need to.
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Realitysreflexx
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Yeah but, what if i would have read an unbalanced thread like this before doing my foundation year, and decided against it...would i be just a mere 10 months from completing my degree?

Remember, some people do read, this stuff and actually take TSR advice pretty seriously.
(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
It's you that's inserting the quality of universities into this mate. You've taken this thread far more personally than you need to.
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dsmith23
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(Original post by Retired_Messiah)
Foundation years are designed for people who did badly in school. Don't take them unless you also did badly or are chronically under-confident in yourself.
In addition to this they're also designed for students that did not study the correct subjects (and therefore lack knowledge that is assumed) for direct entry onto the undergrad course.
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Xarao
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Has to do with the fact you eluded to only people with bad grades and me providing you evidence that in fact it is possible that foundation can be completed with good results and lead to good universities.
It is for people with bad grades. There's nothing wrong with that, nor do you need to get aggressive over it. It's just a fact.
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Realitysreflexx
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Like i said i converted my foreign education through a foundation course that was A level equivalent and achieved AAB. And went to a top 20 Uni. So it isn't just for people with bad grades.

That's just your ignorant view.
(Original post by Xarao)
It is for people with bad grades. There's nothing wrong with that, nor do you need to get aggressive over it. It's just a fact.
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Xarao
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Like i said i converted my foreign education through a foundation course that was A level equivalent and achieved AAB. And went to a top 20 Uni. So it isn't just for people with bad grades.

That's just your ignorant view.
That's because your foreign education isn't recognised, which means you're basically equivalent to someone that has no grades at all and you still got into a foundation degree. Thanks for proving my point buddy.
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Matstu77
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I am doing a foundation year. I am a mature student and although I have ran a business for the last 15 years, I am using the foundation as a stepping stone to brush up my skills of study, get used to returning to education and helping with any gaps that I am ned support with
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University of East Anglia
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(Original post by Olivia19191)
I am an EU student and I’m currently thinking about going to uni, starting 2020. I’m planning to do Business Management. However... Can anyone tell me what is the difference between BA Hons, and a foundation year in uni? Why do people prefer to do foundation year instead of moving on to BA Hons straight away? Is it because universities offer foundation year for students with lower grades? And BA Hons for students with better grades?
Hi Olivia19191,

Foundation Year courses tend to be for those who feel that they need a bit more preparation or a foundation of knowledge before progressing onto a certain course. A Foundation Year can also be a stepping stone into study if someone does not meet the typical entry requirements of a certain course.

Feel free to read UEA’s information on Foundation Years and the Foundation courses we provide here.

If you have any more questions, or would like to explore options at UEA (a top 15 UK university!), feel free to message me!

Emilie – Official UEA TSR Rep
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