I graduated with a third class Watch

mgi
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#41
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(Original post by MWills99)
That's a shame OP, with a 3rd, you may as well not have done the degree
Not necessarily. Sometimes people need to learn the hard way thst going to uni can be a waste if time even if you get a good degree!
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MorbidThumbs
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#42
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Good to see some people being nice and assuring. Well I have a decent story for you. I had a friend who graduated from a middling university (definitely nothing special, but not going to name it) with a third in Journalism. He was not the smartest scholastically so the fact that he graduated was still an achievement, even if some people in here don't see it that way. He then got a nothing job at the local newspaper (I think he was legit just running errands), he eventually worked his way up and started typing articles for them. Five years later and he is now a reporter for the Daily Mail (not a fan of the newspaper but whatever) and is doing VERY well for himself in London.

I also have a mate who graduated in the same year, got a first in Applied Psychology and is working as a till operator in LIDL.
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#43
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Trust me, grades literally do not matter, it's not medicine or law.
I've made it to finance, which sucked by the way, with top grades from top universities but didn't really need that. Now I'm out of work and being presented job offers which I'm afraid to take, and my grades do not matter. If anything, I wish I studied a bit less and partied a bit more, or at least lived my student life more vividly, or literally anything outside of library.
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mgi
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The idea that a degree improves your life or gives you a better chance of getting a job or earning more money is now an old-fashioned delusion!
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Bang Outta Order
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Erm. You should have resat or revised...

With my modules, I've been getting 60-80% so if I were to graduate I'd have a 2:1. When I'm at better financial standing I'll finish. Right now on gap year. :banana2: but tbh I just want a bachelor's to teach abroad. Which I don't even need a bachelor's for because I found two nother ways to teach abroad and I don't need a degree now to work and survive so what the hell but yh I'm not looking at a 1st for sure but I might get a 2nd.
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MorbidThumbs
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(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
Erm. You should have resat or revised...

With my modules, I've been getting 60-80% so if I were to graduate I'd have a 2:1. When I'm at better financial standing I'll finish. Right now on gap year. :banana2: but tbh I just want a bachelor's to teach abroad. Which I don't even need a bachelor's for because I found two nother ways to teach abroad and I don't need a degree now to work and survive so what the hell but yh I'm not looking at a 1st for sure but I might get a 2nd.
Sometimes people can revise and still not do well. Some people are just naturally not very good at exams, but absolutely rock the coursework side of degrees. As for resitting certain modules, in the university I went to, if you had to resit a module, exam or course work because you failed it then you could only get a pass, even if you hand in a first worthy piece of courswork.

Congratz on finding more ways to do what you want though man! It's getting harder and harder in this day and age to go and do what you want in life so kudos to that amigo!
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I got a 3rd for my degree years ago. Got lots of work experience and completed a PGCE.
I omit my classification on my CV and all applications. I am always asked for an interview, my classification has never come up.
Sheer determination and hard work pulled off for me.
It took me a good two years to be able to talk openly about my degree. I got a 3rd because I had to resubmit my dissertation and the university put a ceiling of a 3rd on it. Gutted, but it's done now. The dissertation was worth 40% of my overall degree. I have an honours degree at the end of the day.
Most employers look at an individual rather than a grade. Good references, voluntary work and work experience is the key.

well done on getting your degree :-)
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mgi
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(Original post by MorbidThumbs)
Sometimes people can revise and still not do well. Some people are just naturally not very good at exams, but absolutely rock the coursework side of degrees. As for resitting certain modules, in the university I went to, if you had to resit a module, exam or course work because you failed it then you could only get a pass, even if you hand in a first worthy piece of courswork.

Congratz on finding more ways to do what you want though man! It's getting harder and harder in this day and age to go and do what you want in life so kudos to that amigo!
Judging by the experience of much older people, i think it highly unlikely that life is harder for young people these days than it was back in the days! The other myth often given is that passing exams well is somehow about natural ability. I think exam success is much more about proper effort, motivation, focus and being determined to find revision strategies that work for that particular individual. You could, no doubt , learn to speak Mandarin Chinese or Russian if you were focussed, strategic and determined.
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Fly to sky
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(Original post by mgi)
Judging by the experience of much older people, i think it highly unlikely that life is harder for young people these days than it was back in the days! The other myth often given is that passing exams well is somehow about natural ability. I think exam success is much more about proper effort, motivation, focus and being determined to find revision strategies that work for that particular individual. You could, no doubt , learn to speak Mandarin Chinese or Russian if you were focussed, strategic and determined.
Absolutely agree on every aspect of what you said.
In my school days (it was long time ago and not in England) we were thought how to study from year one (6-7 years old kids). Note, particularly study technique.
Also, discipline is paramount importance.
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Galeriapaints
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What was the most interesting, or hardest, most useful, topic on your degree ?
Congratulations on graduating.
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MorbidThumbs
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(Original post by mgi)
Judging by the experience of much older people, i think it highly unlikely that life is harder for young people these days than it was back in the days! The other myth often given is that passing exams well is somehow about natural ability. I think exam success is much more about proper effort, motivation, focus and being determined to find revision strategies that work for that particular individual. You could, no doubt , learn to speak Mandarin Chinese or Russian if you were focussed, strategic and determined.
There was a time when people would go to University, graduate and fall into a job and a career, or so I was told at least. This very sentiment happened to my parents, as they have told me on multiple occasions how they and their siblings pretty much had the same experience. Nothing about school/college/university being easier or harder. However, every experience is different and perhaps the people who have told me this are looking at it through rose tinted glasses. I have also been told on many occasions how they would not like to be students graduating in this day and age, again this is just their opinion, not fact and I will not pass it off as so.

When it comes to exams, I will have to disagree with you. Some people do struggle more than others to retain information, even when they have tried different methods. I'm not stating that something as ridiculous as some people just don't revise whatsoever and then get firsts in degrees (if that happens it's a minor miracle), but some people do have a natural affinity for revision whereas some people struggle. Take myself for example, I graduated a few years ago now with a 2:1 and all I can say is thank god for coursework otherwise I would never had achieved the 2:1, even with weeks of revision at a time. However, I had a house mate (and considered as a "best friend" at the time) who although achieved the same grading as me, would write notes up, look at them, repeat them a few times and this was literally his whole revision process. I will never forget the jealousy where I would see his high 2:1, low first exam marks compared to my middlish 2:2 exam marks. Perhaps he was the exception from the rule, we may never know.
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Just my opinion
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Today we have less people studying STEM than 30 years ago even though we have 3x as many attending uni than 30years ago.
Does a degreed increase your earnings considerably over your life time? Well they certainly used to, and if you get a decent degree in a decent subject from a decent Uni then yes, but even the government expect only 50% to go on to earn enough to pay the loan back. What does that tell you about the potential earnings of large numbers of grads and the value of their degrees on the open jobs market?
We live in a time when degrees are like arseh*les..... everybody has one.
1 in every 5 theme part attendants have a degree. 1 in every 4 childminders.
People say they lowered the standards to keep the numbers up of people going through the system. That's not quite right. They had to dig a hole in the ground to get the standards low enough.
50% get in with two D's at A level and one Uni ran over 90 course where you could get in with two Es.
What's the point of having a degree if one in every two people has one and if less than one in ten students on many courses will find a graduate job
( The Great University Con. by David Craig ISBN-13: 978-1872188140 )
It is a massive money spinner with hundreds of thousands of academic jobs hanging on the whole gravy train not stopping.
At some time in the future we will look back and realise it makes all the pension and mortgage miss- selling that went on seem like small beer.
It could be worse though, in the US you have to pay the debt regardless of how much you earn.
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Just my opinion
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Just my opinion
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mgi
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Remind me. How many degrees did Richard Branson, Paul McCartney and Steve Jobs have between them?
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Just my opinion
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True. Just don't look up the odds on becoming a Branson or Jobs.😁
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mgi
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(Original post by Just my opinion)
True. Just don't look up the odds on becoming a Branson or Jobs.😁
Ok ,but there are so many people who doing ever so fine without a degree or even being able to read! - like the guy next door to me who runs his own business refurbishing flats! Degrees are grossly over rated.
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Just my opinion
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(Original post by mgi)
Ok ,but there are so many people who doing ever so fine without a degree or even being able to read! - like the guy next door to me who runs his own business refurbishing flats! Degrees are grossly over rated.
In many many fields I agree. My brother in law started in panel beating, went into property development and is now a multi millionaire, all on the back of a couple of O levels.
Blair fired the starting pistol in the great degree arms race.
It's not just what would be called Mickey mouse degrees. The percentage of law grads working in call centers, sat alongside people without degrees is something never acknowledged. We are churning out many times more than there are jobs in the field.
My niece got a 1:2 but he trouble is there are any number with a first after every job she goes for. The problem is the sheer weight of numbers chasing positions.
Forensic medicine is another one.
In some subjects 9 out of 10 don't get a job in their qualifying field.
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Arcaneballs
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Students around here think that everything revolves around their degree - that's the only reason they are unemployed and probably, are frustrated and unemployable.

Btw - watch this Degree - ‘no evidence’ it equals success

Oh, and also, degree may just give you an easier entrance in the interview room, but from there on, soft skills are the factors that help you get that job, which most of these peeps lack.
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asif007
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Some of the richest people in the world are university dropouts or never attended at all. Any idiot who tells you that your degree is worthless because of the classification has obviously never spent a day at university in their life. Employers look for the complete package, not just how good you look on paper. That’s why interviews exist, so you have a chance to impress in person and show that you aren’t defined by your grades. I would use this as an opportunity to develop other skills that are sought after by employers. Get some work experience in your field, do voluntary work while you apply for jobs, improve your communication and teamwork skills, travel a bit. Make sure you’re constantly learning something new every day - that way you can fill the rest of your CV with all these important skills and experience and keep your degree details minimal.

I think it’s worth mentioning that I know people who never went to university but started working as soon as they left school and are now earning well enough to live comfortably in London. On the other hand, two close friends of mine got Firsts in very well respected degrees at top universities AND did Masters degrees but both of them were out of work for around 3 years until very recently. I think this goes to show that there is no clear cut path to success and just because other people are all doing the same thing, doesn’t mean you have to as well. Don’t be afraid to strike out on your own and do things differently. Life is a marathon, not a sprint.
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