advice from previous physics a level students?

Watch
helloworld121
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
Just finished my gcse's and hesitant about choosing physics at a level. I am predicted an A star at GCSE level but is it too much along with chemistry and biology at a level?
Just wondering how others found it at a level because I am not taking maths but physics has a lot of maths in it
0
reply
Galeriapaints
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 months ago
#2
You will eventually need an A-level in mathematics if you want to go to University and use whatever it is you learnt in Physics.
0
reply
helloworld121
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#3
i am set on doing medicine at university however was wondering if doing physics without maths at a level would be too much of a strain? x
(Original post by Galeriapaints)
You will eventually need an A-level in mathematics if you want to go to University and use whatever it is you learnt in Physics.
0
reply
avacados1
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 months ago
#4
(Original post by helloworld121)
i am set on doing medicine at university however was wondering if doing physics without maths at a level would be too much of a strain? x
If you are medicine, I wouldn’t recommend it but obviously it’s about what you enjoy. If you wanna go to the top unis, they probably want 3 science subjects as well
0
reply
Galeriapaints
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 months ago
#5
Physics and Maths help each other, So it wouldnt be a strain it would be easier. Think of it as 1 subject called physimaths. =)


(Original post by helloworld121)
i am set on doing medicine at university however was wondering if doing physics without maths at a level would be too much of a strain? x
1
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by helloworld121)
Just finished my gcse's and hesitant about choosing physics at a level. I am predicted an A star at GCSE level but is it too much along with chemistry and biology at a level?
Just wondering how others found it at a level because I am not taking maths but physics has a lot of maths in it
You don't strictly need maths for physics, and much of it will be fine with gcse knowledge.
However, there are a couple of A level maths topics you must learn. Exponentials and logarithms- this is essential. You should be fine self teaching them if you're decent at maths though
1
reply
Galeriapaints
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 months ago
#7
This is incorrect. What would you be fine doing, if you only have GCSE knowledge of Maths? To get into University programs it is important to have documented qualifications.
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
You don't strictly need maths for physics, and much of it will be fine with gcse knowledge.
However, there are a couple of A level maths topics you must learn. Exponentials and logarithms- this is essential. You should be fine self teaching them if you're decent at maths though
0
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 months ago
#8
(Original post by Galeriapaints)
This is incorrect. What would you be fine doing, if you only have GCSE knowledge of Maths? To get into University programs it is important to have documented qualifications.
Well yeah for university, but OP is asking for A level physics.

To take A level physics, you do not also need to take A level maths. There are a number of A level students taking physics without maths at my college and others
1
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 8 months ago
#9
(Original post by Galeriapaints)
This is incorrect. What would you be fine doing, if you only have GCSE knowledge of Maths? To get into University programs it is important to have documented qualifications.
And other than exponentials and logs, name one technique required for A level physics that is not covered in GCSE maths
0
reply
Leviathan1611
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 8 months ago
#10
it's fun, do countless practice questions and ask questions when you're stuck, study hard (memorising content) and you'll be fine
2
reply
effystonem
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report 8 months ago
#11
Doing A Level Maths alongside Physics helped me personally, as the mechanics in Maths and Physics lined up pretty well. I did Further Maths too and this also had stuff on circular motion which was in my OCR B Physics spec. I'd suggest Maths in general as a good A Level to have but maybe I'm biased (I wanna do it at uni lol)
1
reply
Galeriapaints
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 8 months ago
#12
Lots of people make decisions, without knowing why exactly they are doing what they are doing.
Just because the majority of people have done something, does not mean that it was well-advised to begin with.
The students at your college will have to go back and do the math, but unfortunately they will only find out later down the line.

Planning for the future needs to be goal-orientated and strategic.

You do need to take Maths with Physics. Explaining why needs to be saved for another chat because it is off topic =).
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Well yeah for university, but OP is asking for A level physics.

To take A level physics, you do not also need to take A level maths. There are a number of A level students taking physics without maths at my college and others
1
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 months ago
#13
(Original post by Galeriapaints)
Lots of people make decisions, without knowing why exactly they are doing what they are doing.
Just because the majority of people have done something, does not mean that it was well-advised to begin with.
The students at your college will have to go back and do the math, but unfortunately they will only find out later down the line.

Planning for the future needs to be goal-orientated and strategic.

You do need to take Maths with Physics. Explaining why needs to be saved for another chat because it is off topic =).
Well of course, it is certainly *advisable* to take maths with physics, and the vast majority do so.
My point was that it is not compulsory, and in all honesty it would be possible to do it without maths, just unwise
0
reply
Galeriapaints
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#14
Report 8 months ago
#14
The original poster was not looking for unwise advise ( I assume).
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Well of course, it is certainly *advisable* to take maths with physics, and the vast majority do so.
My point was that it is not compulsory, and in all honesty it would be possible to do it without maths, just unwise
0
reply
06chiama
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#15
Report 8 months ago
#15
If you want to do medicine I’d advise biology chemistry and psychology. Stay away from physics. Don’t make life difficult if you don’t have to. The main thing is getting in
3
reply
GreenCub
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report 8 months ago
#16
Physics is generally considered one of the harder A levels, but so are chemistry and to a lesser extent, biology.

A lot of people will tell you that you 'need' to take A level maths alongside physics, but there is very little mathematical content in A level physics in order to make it accessible to those not taking A level maths. There will be some exponents and logarithms questions, but these topics aren't difficult to pick up if you did well in maths at GCSE.

The reason why taking maths is recommended is because A level physics has a lot of formula-rearranging, standard form, proportionality and the need to determine how a quantity changes when one variable changes in the equation. None of this is beyond GCSE level, but you do need to be very comfortable with these skills to do well. In addition, the mechanics topics in A level maths complement the physics mechanics topics very well.

If you're taking 3 A levels and planning to go into medicine, perhaps it may be a better idea to pick something else other than physics (although if your basic maths skills are very good, physics should be doable) if you aren't planning to take maths (to make it more likely that you'll get the grades). Have you considered biology, chemistry and maths?
1
reply
effystonem
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#17
Report 8 months ago
#17
I second this, Bio and Chem are respectable as they are, take an easier 3rd subject. Physics is arguably the hardest A-Level for a reason
(Original post by 06chiama)
If you want to do medicine I’d advise biology chemistry and psychology. Stay away from physics. Don’t make life difficult if you don’t have to. The main thing is getting in
0
reply
timoteachalamet
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 months ago
#18
hi OP just wanted to say i am in the same boat as you. I want to do medicine at uni so i am doing bio and chem but i chose physics as my third option bc i really like physics but my biggest worry was the maths bc ppl have said to take maths a level too, but i am not passionate enough about maths to do it as a whole a level. from what i have read the maths with be a little bit hard but if you were good at maths in gcse then you will understand a level physics' maths. However i am taking an AS called core maths which would help a little and when i start i'm going to try to do maths one hour a day. I got a book from cgp called 'Essential Maths Skills for A Level Physics' and it is really helpful and i'm sure i can find practice questions online for each topic listed e.g. logarithms, resolving vectors etc. x
0
reply
gabby:)
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 months ago
#19
(Original post by Galeriapaints)
Lots of people make decisions, without knowing why exactly they are doing what they are doing.
Just because the majority of people have done something, does not mean that it was well-advised to begin with.
The students at your college will have to go back and do the math, but unfortunately they will only find out later down the line.

Planning for the future needs to be goal-orientated and strategic.

You do need to take Maths with Physics. Explaining why needs to be saved for another chat because it is off topic =).
You don’t need Maths to take A-Level Physics, I’m currently in year 13 having taken Physics without Maths and that hasn’t hindered my learning in any way. It’s recommended because of the overlap between Mechanics like someone else stated which makes it “easier”, this is subjective, and because of the problem-solving/analytical skills Maths provides - most of which are taught at GCSE level. My teacher even said today there shouldn’t necessarily be anything on the Physics course that you have to take A-Level Maths to understand, so unless OP struggles in Maths there’s no need for it.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Regarding Ofqual's most recent update, do you think you will be given a fair grade this summer?

Yes (279)
33.98%
No (542)
66.02%

Watched Threads

View All