What have Grade 9 students done to revise?

Watch
epicnm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
If you achieved a grade 8/9/A* in GCSE, what subject was it in and how did you revise that subject(e.g revision cards/mind maps) and how did you format these revision techniques. Also how long before GCSEs you’d started revision and if you’d done any revision prior in year 10. Thanks.
0
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by epicnm)
If you achieved a grade 8/9/A* in GCSE, what subject was it in and how did you revise that subject(e.g revision cards/mind maps) and how did you format these revision techniques. Also how long before GCSEs you’d started revision and if you’d done any revision prior in year 10. Thanks.
Perhaps not the best question to ask, as you'll actually see (particularly towards the top end of grade 9) a negative correlation.
Many of the highest ability students just simply do not do much revision at all. On the other hand, the rest of the students with those marks will do insane amounts of revision- the split will become pretty extreme between no revision and intense revision
1
reply
epicnm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
Thanks for replying. I see where your coming from, especially given that the people I know achieving 9s seem to do little revision. I’m definitely not someone who can gain high marks through not revising and am probably the one who would need to do extreme amounts of revision. I guess I’m aiming the question more towards those who aren’t “naturally talented” with attaining very high marks without revision.
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Perhaps not the best question to ask, as you'll actually see (particularly towards the top end of grade 9) a negative correlation.
Many of the highest ability students just simply do not do much revision at all. On the other hand, the rest of the students with those marks will do insane amounts of revision- the split will become pretty extreme between no revision and intense revision
0
reply
slimthicc
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
i got six 9s (bio, chem, physics, rs, geog, history), one A* (business) and four 8s (maths, french, english lit and lang) when i did my gcses last year.

i would say you need to be aware of your own UNIQUE method of learning and how you best remember information, and put this to practice when you take your mocks so that you can alter your techniques for your real gcses and hopefully finesse them.

as a guide, here are my tips based on my experience and what i would have done if i could go back.

1) gcses are a MEMORY GAME: learn the bare minimum required and you WILL get the top grades, it is as simple as this. this is especially true in the content based subjects like the sciences and humanities (the ones i did best in), so LEARN THE SPECIFICATION (this is your bible) and nothing else.

2) use ACTIVE RECALL in as much revision as you can: you need to be actively trying to recall the information and not be passively taking it in by reading, as this is not what you would be doing in the exam. try the technique of blurting, google it. i didn’t do exam questions (ran out of time and there were few past papers at the time) but DEFINITELY do practice questions as this is the best way to test yourself.

3) for ME (i am not endorsing this at all but this worked for me, as i have a v good memory naturally), i would wake up at 4am on the morning of my content heavy exams and just go through all the information (for AM exams), and wake up normal time for pm exams and do the same. if you KNOW cramming works for you, do it.

4) don’t be lazy: I was lazy in maths, I could’ve easily gotten a 9 if I had bothered with practicising skills but I focussed on my other subjects because I knew I would be fine even if I didn’t revise. but TRUST ME, it feels pretty bad to get a grade back that is lower than you wanted because you didn’t put the work in, same goes for English lit/ lang. you need to push yourself because it will be worth it in the end.

I can’t think of anything else rn but good luck! just work as hard as you can and there’ll be no way that you’ll feel unhappy with whatever grades you end up with.
2
reply
slimthicc
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
this is true, i think the purpose of the grade 9 was to distinguish the 'cleverest' and often (having seen students in my school and the amount of revision they did vs their grades) the best do the least and aren't the most hardworking (myself). so my advice probably isn't the most helpful!
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Perhaps not the best question to ask, as you'll actually see (particularly towards the top end of grade 9) a negative correlation.
Many of the highest ability students just simply do not do much revision at all. On the other hand, the rest of the students with those marks will do insane amounts of revision- the split will become pretty extreme between no revision and intense revision
0
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by slimthicc)
this is true, i think the purpose of the grade 9 was to distinguish the 'cleverest' and often (having seen students in my school and the amount of revision they did vs their grades) the best do the least and aren't the most hardworking (myself). so my advice probably isn't the most helpful!
Yeah me too, I went through GCSE's with no revision and came out with a set of 9s and A*s (and one 8 because I hate English lit).
I took the same approach to A levels, though might not have been wise since further maths didn't go great and I need it for my cam offer (waiting for results now...). So my advice- if you're like this, don't be too overconfident!
0
reply
epicnm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#7
Thanks, this was really helpful. Can I also ask because I’ve looked at the specification for AQA Chemistry (specifically) and there are certain things not in the specification (such as the colours of transition metals) but appear in the textbook and exams. This has led me to draw away from using specifications because it seems to lack some knowledge required. Do you recommend using specifications for all subjects, even if not all content is covered in it. Furthermore, my history specification is vague in terms of what you have to know. Whereas things like maths and science specifically will tell you “You must know how to rearrange an equation to find a subject”, the history specification only gives subtitles for content, such as for medicine, “Galen and The Theory of the 4 Humours”, which is not specific in terms of what you need to revise, so how do you reccommend going about learning that without a spec. I’ve just been following the textbook, but in exam questions, have been getting questions which the textbook only briefly touches on or is in very fine print.

Also, in terms of active recall, I’ve tried this technique but am slightly confused as to how to go about recalling it. Should I be recalling it at intervals and how often should I go about doing so. And when I try to recall the information, should I purely just be testing myself with flash cards. I’ve heard of the blurting technique so will definitley try that.

I’ve tried cramming aswell, which seems to only work for the subjects like sciences, but not so much with humanities, which I’ve found interesting aswell.

Thanks for your help, and sorry for so many questions!
(Original post by slimthicc)
i got six 9s (bio, chem, physics, rs, geog, history), one A* (business) and four 8s (maths, french, english lit and lang) when i did my gcses last year.

i would say you need to be aware of your own UNIQUE method of learning and how you best remember information, and put this to practice when you take your mocks so that you can alter your techniques for your real gcses and hopefully finesse them.

as a guide, here are my tips based on my experience and what i would have done if i could go back.

1) gcses are a MEMORY GAME: learn the bare minimum required and you WILL get the top grades, it is as simple as this. this is especially true in the content based subjects like the sciences and humanities (the ones i did best in), so LEARN THE SPECIFICATION (this is your bible) and nothing else.

2) use ACTIVE RECALL in as much revision as you can: you need to be actively trying to recall the information and not be passively taking it in by reading, as this is not what you would be doing in the exam. try the technique of blurting, google it. i didn’t do exam questions (ran out of time and there were few past papers at the time) but DEFINITELY do practice questions as this is the best way to test yourself.

3) for ME (i am not endorsing this at all but this worked for me, as i have a v good memory naturally), i would wake up at 4am on the morning of my content heavy exams and just go through all the information (for AM exams), and wake up normal time for pm exams and do the same. if you KNOW cramming works for you, do it.

4) don’t be lazy: I was lazy in maths, I could’ve easily gotten a 9 if I had bothered with practicising skills but I focussed on my other subjects because I knew I would be fine even if I didn’t revise. but TRUST ME, it feels pretty bad to get a grade back that is lower than you wanted because you didn’t put the work in, same goes for English lit/ lang. you need to push yourself because it will be worth it in the end.

I can’t think of anything else rn but good luck! just work as hard as you can and there’ll be no way that you’ll feel unhappy with whatever grades you end up with.
0
reply
epicnm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#8
That’s true because I’ve seen that first hand, especially in tests which the teacher surprises our classes with, giving them no time to “revise”.
(Original post by slimthicc)
this is true, i think the purpose of the grade 9 was to distinguish the 'cleverest' and often (having seen students in my school and the amount of revision they did vs their grades) the best do the least and aren't the most hardworking (myself). so my advice probably isn't the most helpful!
0
reply
epicnm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
Yeah, were you the first to do the new GCSEs? I’m also worried because the grade boundaries seem to be quite low now and that by the time I go to take my GCSEs, (2020), the government will have finished “experimenting” with the harder GCSEs and push the grade boundaries really high
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Yeah me too, I went through GCSE's with no revision and came out with a set of 9s and A*s (and one 8 because I hate English lit).
I took the same approach to A levels, though might not have been wise since further maths didn't go great and I need it for my cam offer (waiting for results now...). So my advice- if you're like this, don't be too overconfident!
0
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by epicnm)
Yeah, were you the first to do the new GCSEs? I’m also worried because the grade boundaries seem to be quite low now and that by the time I go to take my GCSEs, (2020), the government will have finished “experimenting” with the harder GCSEs and push the grade boundaries really high
Yeah, I was the year they first introduced them to some subjects. Maths and English were 1-9, the rest were still letter grades.
And the grade boundaries are ridiculously low yeah. The percentage of students getting each grade does not change significantly though, so the grade boundaries will not rise significantly unless the papers get easier
0
reply
epicnm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#11
As much as I’d like the papers to be easier, I think I’d be more confident with a harder paper and lower grade boundaries for sciences and for humanities an easier paper but higher grade boundaries. I wish the exam boards used the same difficulty of paper each year so there wouldn’t be a massive gap in raw marks between mocks and the actual exam!
(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Yeah, I was the year they first introduced them to some subjects. Maths and English were 1-9, the rest were still letter grades.
And the grade boundaries are ridiculously low yeah. The percentage of students getting each grade does not change significantly though, so the grade boundaries will not rise significantly unless the papers get easier
0
reply
MagnumKoishi
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by epicnm)
As much as I’d like the papers to be easier, I think I’d be more confident with a harder paper and lower grade boundaries for sciences and for humanities an easier paper but higher grade boundaries. I wish the exam boards used the same difficulty of paper each year so there wouldn’t be a massive gap in raw marks between mocks and the actual exam!
Oh definitely, I vastly prefer hard papers with low boundaries. It means that silly, careless mistakes do not have significant weighting
(I'm only taking STEM subjects, so this doesn't apply to humanities)
0
reply
slimthicc
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
I did aqa sciences too and whenever i felt the specification didn't go into detail about something enough, or only gave a vague statement about what we were meant to know, i would use the textbook and condense this as much as possible. i did edexcel history and i found that my textbook covered exactly everything i needed to know, so i'm not too sure about that sorry maybe ask your teacher?

i checked the aqa spec for chem and it states:
'Many transition elements have ions with different charges, form
coloured compounds and are useful as catalysts.
Students should be able to exemplify these general properties by
reference to compounds of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu.'
So from this i would think you need to know some coloured compounds formed by the transition metals stated? but if this is difficult to remember don't worry about it too much, the most you could lose on a question as specific as this would be 1 mark.

so when i used active recall (there are so many ways to do this btw, doesn't have to be blurting, it could be flashcards, exam qs, getting others to test you, etc). it's important to used spaced repetition when doing this, i'd recommend watching some videos by ali abdaal on youtube about active recall and spaced repetition. i'd also recommend trying his retrospective revision timetable, i found this so much better for revision than other methods!

feel free to ask as many questions as you would like!!
(Original post by epicnm)
Thanks, this was really helpful. Can I also ask because I’ve looked at the specification for AQA Chemistry (specifically) and there are certain things not in the specification (such as the colours of transition metals) but appear in the textbook and exams. This has led me to draw away from using specifications because it seems to lack some knowledge required. Do you recommend using specifications for all subjects, even if not all content is covered in it. Furthermore, my history specification is vague in terms of what you have to know. Whereas things like maths and science specifically will tell you “You must know how to rearrange an equation to find a subject”, the history specification only gives subtitles for content, such as for medicine, “Galen and The Theory of the 4 Humours”, which is not specific in terms of what you need to revise, so how do you reccommend going about learning that without a spec. I’ve just been following the textbook, but in exam questions, have been getting questions which the textbook only briefly touches on or is in very fine print.

Also, in terms of active recall, I’ve tried this technique but am slightly confused as to how to go about recalling it. Should I be recalling it at intervals and how often should I go about doing so. And when I try to recall the information, should I purely just be testing myself with flash cards. I’ve heard of the blurting technique so will definitley try that.

I’ve tried cramming aswell, which seems to only work for the subjects like sciences, but not so much with humanities, which I’ve found interesting aswell.

Thanks for your help, and sorry for so many questions!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (686)
33.89%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (860)
42.49%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (387)
19.12%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (91)
4.5%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise