Skylar.J
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Do all overseas do BMAT for manchester? I dont quite understand the second condition on their website.
Thank you
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GANFYD
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#22
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(Original post by Skylar.J)
Do all overseas do BMAT for manchester? I dont quite understand the second condition on their website.
Thank you
No, overseas applicants may offer BMAT instead of UCAT if:
"You have studied and have or will achieve a U.S. High School Diploma (but do not have Scholastic Aptitude Test II or Advanced Placement qualifications which would satisfy our standard entry requirements)."

So if you meet minimum requirements then UCAT is fine
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Skylar.J
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(Original post by GANFYD)
No, overseas applicants may offer BMAT instead of UCAT if:
"You have studied and have or will achieve a U.S. High School Diploma (but do not have Scholastic Aptitude Test II or Advanced Placement qualifications which would satisfy our standard entry requirements)."

So if you meet minimum requirements then UCAT is fine
So to clarify, if i am an international student who is currently studying in uk and am taking A levels / preU, i should submit UCAT for manchester and i do not need to sit bmat.
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Skylar.J)
So to clarify, if i am an international student who is currently studying in uk and am taking A levels / preU, i should submit UCAT for manchester and i do not need to sit bmat.
That is how it reads to me
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singzeon
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#25
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(Original post by Skylar.J)
So to clarify, if i am an international student who is currently studying in uk and am taking A levels / preU, i should submit UCAT for manchester and i do not need to sit bmat.
I should think so. I am an international student and I used UKCAT (the former UCAT) to apply for Manchester.

If in doubt, you can always call the medical school to confirm.
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singzeon
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(Original post by Chloe3238)
Hiya,
So with the PBL course, how many lectures do you get a week? Also any tips for the application and the non-academic form if you did that?
Based on my year 1 experience, 3 hours (consecutive) on a Tuesday afternoon, 3 hours (consecutive) on a Wednesday morning. Semester 1 has 'wrap-up' lectures on Friday at noon, immediately after your PBL closing session.

Anyway lectures are video-recorded unless otherwise stated and can be viewed online. So they are actually not compulsory (attendance isn't taken). In theory it is possible to not attend any lecture at all if you prefer to self-study (PBL).
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singzeon
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(Original post by smscku)
Hi, I've seen your blog and a lot of it is very informative I was wondering if you think it is possible to have a part time job during years 1 and 2. I'm international so I will seriously need the income to avoid taking out as much in loans. I know most people say you can't have a job due to the workload, but most people aren't facing 50k/year in debt! I would like to work as many hours as possible, which is maxed at 20 hrs/week. But maybe 10-15 is more realistic. Thanks for any insight you can give on this. On another note- is it typical to find a summer job for more hours when school is off?
I am international as well; indeed the fees are no small sum. Personally I didn't work during the two years, but I think it is fairly common for people to do so. Because of the way the programme is (PBL), you will have free time throughout the week and it is up to you how you spend it. So if you are very disciplined, I'm sure it's possible to squeeze in some work hours. Of course you do have to attend lessons as per normal; one of the requirements of a tier 4 visa is minimum attendance (and it's a professionalism issue too).

Depending on what type of job you are after, you may also be able to look for those which are more flexible in nature, where you don't have to commit too much beforehand. This will be handy if in case you realise you need more time during the week for a particular case.
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Skylar.J
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#28
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With PBL, is it hard to adjust to the learning style at the start and to know how much in depth you need to learn? And it will be really helpful to know what you like/not like about the course/uni.
Thank you
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smscku
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#29
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(Original post by singzeon)
I am international as well; indeed the fees are no small sum. Personally I didn't work during the two years, but I think it is fairly common for people to do so. Because of the way the programme is (PBL), you will have free time throughout the week and it is up to you how you spend it. So if you are very disciplined, I'm sure it's possible to squeeze in some work hours. Of course you do have to attend lessons as per normal; one of the requirements of a tier 4 visa is minimum attendance (and it's a professionalism issue too).

Depending on what type of job you are after, you may also be able to look for those which are more flexible in nature, where you don't have to commit too much beforehand. This will be handy if in case you realise you need more time during the week for a particular case.
Thanks for your advice! How do you find living in Manchester? I lived in London for 6 months and really loved it, but I'm not sure if I would want to spend the money to live there for 5 years. But the general environment was amazing. Manchester seems exciting to me as it seems like the main hub in the north, and like a more up-and-coming city. I'm just hoping to live somewhere that I won't get bored of after 5 years, has a good population of young professionals, fun nightlife, good transport. Thoughts?
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singzeon
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(Original post by Skylar.J)
With PBL, is it hard to adjust to the learning style at the start and to know how much in depth you need to learn? And it will be really helpful to know what you like/not like about the course/uni.
Thank you
Definitely. The medical school is aware of this, and that's why before semester 1 starts officially, you have 2 weeks (2 cases) of practice PBL. They are actual cases (medically accurate etc.), but they will not be tested in sem 1.You can use that period to get used to PBL. They will also have a lecture on the system and how to go about doing it.

Depth is indeed an issue that some students struggle with. There are learning outcomes provided for every case, which is what you can use as a guide. No doubt the ILOs won't be highly prescriptive; there may still be certain things that most people will miss out, but it shouldn't be an issue as long as you have your foundation. (Of course if you're the type aiming for top marks then I guess you should study everything.)

It's also worth mentioning that PBL is a team 'activity', so sometimes the quality of your fellow PBL group members do matter. Hopefully they are generally cooperative and professional. Your tutor also plays a part in your experience; a good tutor will stop the group if they went too in-depth (unnecessarily), or will prompt the group if they have not gone deep enough.

I've had both good and bad PBL experiences; the groups change every semester. So hopefully you (or everyone) gets a good experience throughout the four semesters.

What I like about the course is how content is covered by systems. I know other unis follow the year 1 normal, year 2 abnormal route; personally I find that much harder to process, especially for those with lower motivation and morale. When you learn it system by system, you can really appreciate how physiology turns into pathology within the same few weeks, instead of revisiting it in 2nd year.
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Tigermom
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#31
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They don't do number grades at A Level. My son is starting in Sept. 2019. His entry requirements were AAA. (He got the news this morning that he received A* A* A)
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Charlotte2018
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#32
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Hiya Do you have any tips for completing the non-academic form?
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username4932564
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#33
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Hi, I believe I’ll be applying to Medicine through the holistic assessment route. I got 2640 and a Band 1 in SJT. Which I believe may get me into the top 30 percent but if it doesn’t then this is the worst case scenario.
I’m pretty sure I’ll get interview offers for my three other universities.
Do you think I’ll be given consideration
I had 3 A’s at AS Levels
3 A*s and 3 As at IGCSE
Predicted 3 A*s
Volunteered at a local care home and charity shop. For 4 and 6 months respectively.
And I will still be doing this after applying.
Last edited by username4932564; 5 months ago
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pseudo123
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#34
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I'm an international student (resitting biology and chem too since i got ABB (a in maths) yikes). I'm thinking of applying to manchester but not too sure how good my chances are. I have a 2760 ukcat and band 2 in SJT.
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Tigermom
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#35
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Your UKAT score is good, but Manchester does not accept resits. I did find this online, on who does accept resits, without there being mitigating circumstances surrounding why you didn't achieve the grades the first time:


1. Aston Medical School - applications from students who resit their A Level or equivalent examinations once will be accepted. Applicants who are required to resit more than once will be considered on a case by case basis.
2. University of Exeter Medical School
3. University of Sheffield Medical School - resit applications are permitted. Any and all A Level resits must be taken in the same sitting and only one resit per A Level is permitted.
4. Southampton Medical School - applicants who are retaking their A-levels will be considered for our programmes. However, if applicants have retaken the same subjects more than once, these applications will be considered on a case by case basis.
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Tigermom
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Tigermom)
Your UKAT score is good, but Manchester does not accept resits. I did find this online, on who does accept resits, without there being mitigating circumstances surrounding why you didn't achieve the grades the first time:


1. Aston Medical School - applications from students who resit their A Level or equivalent examinations once will be accepted. Applicants who are required to resit more than once will be considered on a case by case basis.
2. University of Exeter Medical School
3. University of Sheffield Medical School - resit applications are permitted. Any and all A Level resits must be taken in the same sitting and only one resit per A Level is permitted.
4. Southampton Medical School - applicants who are retaking their A-levels will be considered for our programmes. However, if applicants have retaken the same subjects more than once, these applications will be considered on a case by case basis.
From the same source (sorry, I've tried posting the link, but it won't appear):

On top of these four schools, there are a further 15 who will accept applications provided that certain criteria are met, or may otherwise disadvantage resit applicants in the admissions process. Manchester is listed. These schools are:

1. Brighton and Sussex - Student retaking their AS level year can apply if their predicted A-level grades are AAA including Biology and Chemistry. If you are retaking your A2, they will only consider applications from applicants who have slipped a grade in one subject and obtained a grade B (i.e. achieved A levels AAB/A*AB/A*A*B but have a predicted grade A in the re-sat subject). Anyone below grades AAB after two years of study, or who is not predicted a grade A in your re-sit, would only be eligible to apply once receiving grades AAA including Biology and Chemistry after 3 years of study.
2. University of Bristol - A maximum of one resit is allowed in any one subject.
3. Hull York Medical School - Provided applicants did not achieve lower than BBB in their first sitting, resit results are accepted without discrimination. Any lower than this and evidence of extenuating circumstances will be required.
4. Keele University School of Medicine - If you are resitting your A levels, or have taken more than two years to complete them, you must wait until you have your final grades before applying to Keele, i.e. you will not be eligible to apply before the 2020 entry round. They will, however, consider a candidate who has already achieved the required grades but is taking additional subjects. For example, an applicant with achieved grades of AAA but with only one science would be considered if currently taking an additional science A level.
5. King’s College London - Resits are acceptable. However, non-resit applicants are considered as more competitive applications.
Lancaster University Medical School - Applications from applicants who have taken longer than two years to achieve the required grades at A Level are considered if the applicant otherwise meets the GCSE criteria and the non-academic entry requirements. In the absence of mitigating circumstances, students must have achieved at least ABB in their first attempt. All resit applicants must achieve the required grades after three years of study.
6. University of Liverpool - Resits are accepted but the offer may be conditional on higher A-level grades than the typical offer (e.g. minimum A*AA, rather than AAA). Applicants must have scored a minimum of ABB in their first sitting and must reflect on this in their personal statement. For help on this, why not use our Personal Statement Service!
7. University of Manchester – While Manchester do welcome applications from those re-sitting, applicants may only re-sit one of either Year 12 or Year 13. Where A-levels have been attempted in Year 13, applicants are expected to have obtained a minimum of grade B in each subject at the first sitting for the resit grades to be considered. Grades A*AA are required for resitting applicants, with an A* in one of the science subjects.
8. University of East Anglia - Any applicant resitting all or part of an A level is required to include their original grade on the UCAS application form. A level resits will only be considered if a minimum of ABB or AAC was achieved in the first sitting.
9. University of Plymouth, Peninsula Medical School - Applications from resit applicants are welcome providing a minimum of ABB has been achieved at the first attempt.
10. Queen’s University Belfast - Resit candidates are only considered if they previously held an offer from Queen’s at the first attempt and made it their conditional firm choice. In addition, they must have achieved A*AB/AAA at A-level or AAB at A-level plus A in a fourth AS-level at first attempt. The offer for repeat candidates is currently either A*AA or AAA at A-level plus A in a fourth AS level. Only two attempts at A-levels are allowed.
11. University of Leicester - For 2020 entry, in the absence of mitigating circumstances, applicants who attain AAB at their first A-level attempt can apply with a resit in one subject
12. University of Nottingham - Resits of no more than 2 A-levels will be considered under the following conditions: 1) A-levels have been completed in the last 12 months; 2) At least ABB was obtained in the first attempt; 2) One A is currently in Biology/Human Biology or Chemistry; 3) AAA is predicted and must be achieved after the resit.
13. Anglia Ruskin University - A Level resit grades at AAA will be accepted taken within two academic years prior to the time of application.
14. University of Sunderland - A Level resits are accepted under certain circumstances: Where an applicant has been awarded AAB, the applicant is only required to re-sit the B grade subject or Where an applicant has been awarded less than AAB, they are then required to re-sit all 3 A Levels in the same sitting in order to be considered.
15. University of Lancaster - A Level resits are considered if the applicant meets the GCSE criteria and the non-academic entry requirements. Students must have achieved at least ABB in their A-Levels at the first attempt and all resit applicants must achieve the required grades after three years of study.
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GANFYD
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#37
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(Original post by Tigermom)
Your UKAT score is good, but Manchester does not accept resits. I did find this online, on who does accept resits, without there being mitigating circumstances surrounding why you didn't achieve the grades the first time:


1. Aston Medical School - applications from students who resit their A Level or equivalent examinations once will be accepted. Applicants who are required to resit more than once will be considered on a case by case basis.
2. University of Exeter Medical School
3. University of Sheffield Medical School - resit applications are permitted. Any and all A Level resits must be taken in the same sitting and only one resit per A Level is permitted.
4. Southampton Medical School - applicants who are retaking their A-levels will be considered for our programmes. However, if applicants have retaken the same subjects more than once, these applications will be considered on a case by case basis.
Manchester do accept resits, they are even in the second of your posts
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zaiinylii
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Is it worth applying to Manchester medicine if you have a UCAT average below 600 but you have other qualifications (i.e., good A-levels, strong reference, strong NAI)?
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Tigermom
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#39
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Manchester do accept resits, they are even in the second of your post.

Let me rephrase this so that's a little simpler. If you didn't get the grades because of particular circumstances, such as a death in the family, then 15 schools -- including Manchester -- will consider resits, providing you meet the criteria. If you didn't get the grades just because you didn't get the grades, then only four will consider resits, and Manchester is not one of those four.

As the poster didn't attach any reason to why he or she didn't get the grades, I assumed the poster fell into the four-school category.
//
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Tigermom)
//
Nope, no extenuating circumstances needed for any of the med schools in either of your 2 lists, though some do have minimum grades for a first sitting and/or higher grades required for a resit.
Manchester say:
"Do you accept A-level re-sits?
We welcome applications from those re-sitting their A-levels, though you may only re-sit one of either Year 12 or Year 13.

Where A-levels have been attempted in Year 13, you are expected to have obtained a minimum of grade B in each subject at the first sitting for the re-sit grades to be considered.

All re-sitting applicants are required to achieve Grades A*AA in the A-level subjects specified above, and the A* is expected to be achieved in the final examinations in either of the two required sciences."


https://www.bmh.manchester.ac.uk/stu...ne/apply/faqs/
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