616tony
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I’ve never enquired on student room before so I’m not really sure how it works, but I’m going to try! (First 4 paragraphs are just setting the scene; sorry, I think it’s the English Lit student in me.)

I’m currently waiting for my results in Religious Studies, English Literature and Media Studies A Levels. I’m predicted 3 As however I feel as though I’ve absolutely flunked all my exams, and I need AAB with an A in English Literature to enrol in BA English and Philosophy in September. I’ve already changed my mind about the course I want to do twice (first I had my heart set on BA Theology at Durham, then switched to the same course at Manchester before the UCAS deadline, before rejecting that and applying to English and Philosophy through UCAS Extra).

Clearly I just don’t know what I want to do. I know the best thing to do would be to take a gap year but there’s no room for me at home. I need to leave and go to uni this year but I keep changing my mind about the course I want to do. I’ve always been a humanities and arts loving student that had a natural talent for mathematics and anything number-based. I achieved an A* at GCSE Maths and almost took it at A Level but wasn’t aware that having a range of subjects was a GOOD thing thus ended up taking 3 limiting arts/humanities subjects.

I didn’t take Geography at GCSE (but was always good at it) and achieved BCC in triple science (B in Biology) although, and I know everyone is quick to blame their teachers but, for 2 of the 3 sciences we were left to teach ourselves the content. I was relieved just to pass them Chemistry and Physics to be honest.

I have an interest in planetary science and always loved physical geography but loathed human geography to the point where I took two languages at GCSE to avoid taking geography GCSE and having to study those annoying humans anymore. I think I would enjoy a career in geology or something like that, perhaps palaeontology? I’m not sure. I just feel like in terms of careers, there’s nothing I would be interested in that relates to any of my A Level subjects.

So my question is: would BA Geology/ Physical Geography be something I might find success in? With absolutely no A Level subjects relating to the degree? I know Keele are offering BA Geology through clearing with no subject requirements and it was one I was thinking of applying to before I changed subjects (again, again). Is it a good idea to do this degree with no prior experience since KS3?

I personally feel I would be capable but if someone else has a different opinion I probably need to hear it!! Also, if anyone knows any universities offering similar courses without subject requirements I would find that useful also!
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izzychloe247
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You sound like me tbh!! (Except I hate English related subjects) I also wanna do physical geography and have a natural talent for maths. I’m also indecisive and hate human geography too but stuck doing it at a level!!
Geology sounds like a good idea, you sound like you have an interest in it and if you think you’re capable you should be fine. I’m not sure what the subject requirements are at different places but you could also look at environmental science courses as most unis do them and it’s basically physical geography.
Maybe look through the modules and see what you’d learn, and decide whether you think this would be too hard for you. But honestly geology shouldn’t be too bad because if you have a natural talent for maths that should come in handy too.
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Nununu
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Doesn't Keele do really flexible degrees?

It sounds like you are really unsure what you want to do. So I would recommend going to a uni like Keele where the degrees are very flexible.
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Nununu
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Doesn't Keele do really flexible degrees?

It sounds like you are really unsure what you want to do. So I would recommend going to a uni like Keele where the degrees are very flexible.
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TheSotonian
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Hey,

I've just graduated from a geology undergraduate. The courses provided by most institutions are generally the same. Some involve a little basic maths but generally maths is not a necessity (they teach you what you need). The three sciences are important however. Geophysics, geochemistry and geobiology are often core modules on most courses in some way or another - so being good at them is useful. Environmental, hydro- and engineering geology are becoming more popular as recent additions to most courses - hydro/engineering being particularly maths-heavy.

Geology is also a field/laboratory science so be aware than you'll be doing more practical lab work and fieldwork than wordy courses like English or Philosophy. And hell, all those years ago when I was choosing my degree, I'm sure I was interested in Keele so it must be good.

I would gladly encourage anyone to go into geology, especially if you enjoyed physical geography and hated human geography (I did too haha!). Compared to other degrees it's a little more broad and variable as there is a lot to learn but that means there are plenty of job prospects from seismologists to palaeontologists to hydrologists to tree-hugging environmentalists to moneybags oil barons and the list goes on... Plus geologists are generally well paid!

You never know, maybe you'll find you love structural geology and you might one day have the luxury of meeting me, or not, who knows. There's only one way to find out.

P.S. as long as you can forget all you have 'learnt' in religious studies and theology and accept that all things geological are natural phenomena, then yes, you'll be fine.

Good luck!
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616tony
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Cb
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616tony
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(Original post by Izzyf14)
You sound like me tbh!! (Except I hate English related subjects) I also wanna do physical geography and have a natural talent for maths. I’m also indecisive and hate human geography too but stuck doing it at a level!!
Geology sounds like a good idea, you sound like you have an interest in it and if you think you’re capable you should be fine. I’m not sure what the subject requirements are at different places but you could also look at environmental science courses as most unis do them and it’s basically physical geography.
Maybe look through the modules and see what you’d learn, and decide whether you think this would be too hard for you. But honestly geology shouldn’t be too bad because if you have a natural talent for maths that should come in handy too.
Thanks, I’ll definitely do that! I figured that, considering I was more interested in physical geography, I should be looking at the bachelor of science degrees as opposed to the humanities ones, but it’s really helpful to know that these courses go by other names. I know when I was considering other degrees that was one thing that really got in the way. Thanks for the advice and good luck in pursuing your interest in physical geography
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616tony
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(Original post by TheSotonian)
Hey,

I've just graduated from a geology undergraduate. The courses provided by most institutions are generally the same. Some involve a little basic maths but generally maths is not a necessity (they teach you what you need). The three sciences are important however. Geophysics, geochemistry and geobiology are often core modules on most courses in some way or another - so being good at them is useful. Environmental, hydro- and engineering geology are becoming more popular as recent additions to most courses - hydro/engineering being particularly maths-heavy.

Geology is also a field/laboratory science so be aware than you'll be doing more practical lab work and fieldwork than wordy courses like English or Philosophy. And hell, all those years ago when I was choosing my degree, I'm sure I was interested in Keele so it must be good.

I would gladly encourage anyone to go into geology, especially if you enjoyed physical geography and hated human geography (I did too haha!). Compared to other degrees it's a little more broad and variable as there is a lot to learn but that means there are plenty of job prospects from seismologists to palaeontologists to hydrologists to tree-hugging environmentalists to moneybags oil barons and the list goes on... Plus geologists are generally well paid!

You never know, maybe you'll find you love structural geology and you might one day have the luxury of meeting me, or not, who knows. There's only one way to find out.

P.S. as long as you can forget all you have 'learnt' in religious studies and theology and accept that all things geological are natural phenomena, then yes, you'll be fine.

Good luck!
Religious studies is actually mostly from a secular perspective so that won’t be a problem! I’ve looked at so many different degrees at this point I just settled with English and philosophy in the end because I wanted something I was familiar with (which isn’t a good reason to choose a 3 year degree, that I now know). I loved learning the small amount of geochemistry I covered at GCSE, and could always cope with biology; it was physics that I struggled with mostly due to a shortage of teaching staff (my class ended up teaching ourselves a 2 modules and being a lazy 16 year old I didn’t bother). But I’ve become interested in aspects of physics more as a hobby during a levels.

One of my concerns with an English and philosophy degree is that I will struggle to get a job at the end of it, or at least a job that isn’t teaching, so it’s helpful to know that geology would perhaps be a safer option.

Thanks for the advice!
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ajj2000
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Why not look at a foundation year? It would seem pretty tough diving straight in without any relevant A levels. I'll bet plenty of good universities would love to offer you a course including foundation, and if you find you don't enjoy it after a year you just go and study something more humanities based.

Southampton, for example, seem to have a foundation year for geosciences. I'm sure that other universities do also.
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artful_lounger
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I would recommend as above the best route would be to look for courses with a foundation year. This is a preliminary year 0 where you'll cover the necessary A-level science and maths content you would need in a geology/earth sciences degree, and then subject to attaining appropriate exam results you'll progress into the main degree programme. They're quite widely available; I believe Manchester and Durham, for example, have them. Most foundation years are designed for students who do well in their A-levels but have the "wrong" subjects, or for people who have been out of education for a while (some do take students who did STEM subjects but missed their grades as well though).

Southampton does indeed have a foundation year - actually two - which lead to SOES courses. The Physics/Geophysics/Engineering Foundation year progresses to the geophysics course there (although in theory would be suitable for any SOES course except probably marine biology), while the Science Foundation Year progresses to any of the other SOES courses (including geology). I did the SFY, and it's taught quite well (and is now actually based on the main uni campus too, as opposed to in Eastleigh...which is terrible), and I know two people who went into geology from it (and a lot of others who went into different SOES programmes, mostly oceanography).

You can progress to other degree programmes from the foundation year if you change your mind, either from your initial course (most of the people who went into oceanography originally planned to go into other courses) or into a non-linked course (a couple went into e.g. management or politics courses; I went into maths, which I definitely would not recommend from the SFY, but would probably be reasonable from the physics/etc FY). You can also in theory apply through UCAS to other courses, however there is no guarantee they will accept the foundation year, so I would recommend trying to find a foundation year at a university you would be happy to do your full degree at.
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Keele University
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(Original post by 616tony)
I’ve never enquired on student room before so I’m not really sure how it works, but I’m going to try! (First 4 paragraphs are just setting the scene; sorry, I think it’s the English Lit student in me.)

I’m currently waiting for my results in Religious Studies, English Literature and Media Studies A Levels. I’m predicted 3 As however I feel as though I’ve absolutely flunked all my exams, and I need AAB with an A in English Literature to enrol in BA English and Philosophy in September. I’ve already changed my mind about the course I want to do twice (first I had my heart set on BA Theology at Durham, then switched to the same course at Manchester before the UCAS deadline, before rejecting that and applying to English and Philosophy through UCAS Extra).

Clearly I just don’t know what I want to do. I know the best thing to do would be to take a gap year but there’s no room for me at home. I need to leave and go to uni this year but I keep changing my mind about the course I want to do. I’ve always been a humanities and arts loving student that had a natural talent for mathematics and anything number-based. I achieved an A* at GCSE Maths and almost took it at A Level but wasn’t aware that having a range of subjects was a GOOD thing thus ended up taking 3 limiting arts/humanities subjects.

I didn’t take Geography at GCSE (but was always good at it) and achieved BCC in triple science (B in Biology) although, and I know everyone is quick to blame their teachers but, for 2 of the 3 sciences we were left to teach ourselves the content. I was relieved just to pass them Chemistry and Physics to be honest.

I have an interest in planetary science and always loved physical geography but loathed human geography to the point where I took two languages at GCSE to avoid taking geography GCSE and having to study those annoying humans anymore. I think I would enjoy a career in geology or something like that, perhaps palaeontology? I’m not sure. I just feel like in terms of careers, there’s nothing I would be interested in that relates to any of my A Level subjects.

So my question is: would BA Geology/ Physical Geography be something I might find success in? With absolutely no A Level subjects relating to the degree? I know Keele are offering BA Geology through clearing with no subject requirements and it was one I was thinking of applying to before I changed subjects (again, again). Is it a good idea to do this degree with no prior experience since KS3?

I personally feel I would be capable but if someone else has a different opinion I probably need to hear it!! Also, if anyone knows any universities offering similar courses without subject requirements I would find that useful also!

Hi 616tony,

I know there is a lot of choice out there and it can be overwhelming at times.

Keele do offer combined options and all of these can be found on our website - www.keele.ac.uk/clearing/current-vacancies

We also offer the Foundation Year (Science Foundation), if you were looking at this as an option - www.keele.ac.uk/study/foundationyears/foundationcourses/sciencefoundationyear/#ucas-codes

We do have an Open Day on Sunday 18th August, if you were thinking to visit post results day.

I hope this helps!
Kiran
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LWare
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(Original post by 616tony)
Thanks, I’ll definitely do that! I figured that, considering I was more interested in physical geography, I should be looking at the bachelor of science degrees as opposed to the humanities ones, but it’s really helpful to know that these courses go by other names. I know when I was considering other degrees that was one thing that really got in the way. Thanks for the advice and good luck in pursuing your interest in physical geography
(Original post by 616tony)
Religious studies is actually mostly from a secular perspective so that won’t be a problem! I’ve looked at so many different degrees at this point I just settled with English and philosophy in the end because I wanted something I was familiar with (which isn’t a good reason to choose a 3 year degree, that I now know). I loved learning the small amount of geochemistry I covered at GCSE, and could always cope with biology; it was physics that I struggled with mostly due to a shortage of teaching staff (my class ended up teaching ourselves a 2 modules and being a lazy 16 year old I didn’t bother). But I’ve become interested in aspects of physics more as a hobby during a levels.

One of my concerns with an English and philosophy degree is that I will struggle to get a job at the end of it, or at least a job that isn’t teaching, so it’s helpful to know that geology would perhaps be a safer option.

Thanks for the advice!
Was just going to say--English and Philosophy, are these the types of questions are what you're interested in? What makes us human? What are the urgent, human problems? How do we structure communities to deliver justice? What is truth? What is beauty? What is justice? What makes an argument logical vs. just rhetoric?

Then study what you're interested in! Being able to analyse arguments, and communicate your point across a variety of venues...that's what Philosophy teaches, and is what most employers want! You can study physics and geology modules as wild modules at Kent, and if you wanted you could build a portfolio over your degree if you wanted to use these skills in the end to work in a particular area? Let me know if I can say more!
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Nununu
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I think you might be interested in a Anthropologie degree.

Don't know what's left in clearing tho
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