I’m 22 and finally know what I want to do in life.

Watch
ConRog
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
This is my first time using this so bear with me..

I’ve been out of education since 2012, I left with very poor grades. However, with this being said I am not stupid. I was just stupid back then. I made poor choices based on the people I associated with.

I’ve recently decided what I want to do in life after having this painful conflict for years. I am sure I want to pursue a career in banking, more specifically; investment banking. I understand that this is a gruelling task however, it’s one that I am ready to undertake.

I’m looking for advice to help me best execute this task. I’ll be starting my adult foundation course in September which should give me the relevant GCSE’s.The following year I will be doing a access course. With this in mind I’d like to start as soon as possible with teaching myself the fundamentals but I just don’t know where to start. I really want to achieve an A,A,A*(A* in maths) so I have a chance of getting into LSE.

Does anyone have any recommendations on how many hours a day I need to study and what resources are best?
0
reply
Gujj
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
The textbook for the course/exam board is the most obvious place to start.

There are an endless ammount of resources available online, but some my favourites are;

- Dr Frost Maths (does GCSE and A-Level stuff, straightforward)
- Maths Made Easy (Have their own practice papers, oragnises topics well.)

The best resources will probably come from whoever your exam board is, their practice papers and textbooks will be best.

No-one can tell you how many hours a day to study, because it depends on you. IMO the best way to study is Learn topic -> Practice textbook questions -> Practice exam questions -> repeat. Other methods are the Feynman technique (TL;DR Revise a topic, write it out as if you were teaching someone else, go back and revise more, then go back to your teaching and simplify / expand. This technique more useful at A-Level.)

Don't ask people on this website to teach you specific topics, its almost impossible via forum posts. Youtube videos / khan academy videos will be of better help. Alternatively hire a personal tutor.

Good luck on your journey, friend.
1
reply
Den987
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
I wouldn't do it by hours per day, because it takes longer to understand certain topics than others. However, planning ahead it still going to be the best approach. Are you a visual, auditory, or kinesthetic type learner?
1
reply
ConRog
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Gujj)
The textbook for the course/exam board is the most obvious place to start.

There are an endless ammount of resources available online, but some my favourites are;

- Dr Frost Maths (does GCSE and A-Level stuff, straightforward)
- Maths Made Easy (Have their own practice papers, oragnises topics well.)

The best resources will probably come from whoever your exam board is, their practice papers and textbooks will be best.

No-one can tell you how many hours a day to study, because it depends on you. IMO the best way to study is Learn topic -> Practice textbook questions -> Practice exam questions -> repeat. Other methods are the Feynman technique (TL;DR Revise a topic, write it out as if you were teaching someone else, go back and revise more, then go back to your teaching and simplify / expand. This technique more useful at A-Level.)

Don't ask people on this website to teach you specific topics, its almost impossible via forum posts. Youtube videos / khan academy videos will be of better help. Alternatively hire a personal tutor.

Good luck on your journey, friend.
Thank you very much!
(Original post by Den987)
I wouldn't do it by hours per day, because it takes longer to understand certain topics than others. However, planning ahead it still going to be the best approach. Are you a visual, auditory, or kinesthetic type learner?
Thanks for your reply!

I’d say I was a combination of visual and auditory, that usually works for me. I generally need to work harder than everyone around me for things to stick. This is why I wanna get ahead of the game so I have the very best chance of getting the required grades.
Last edited by ConRog; 2 years ago
0
reply
ConRog
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Gujj)
The textbook for the course/exam board is the most obvious place to start.

There are an endless ammount of resources available online, but some my favourites are;

- Dr Frost Maths (does GCSE and A-Level stuff, straightforward)
- Maths Made Easy (Have their own practice papers, oragnises topics well.)

The best resources will probably come from whoever your exam board is, their practice papers and textbooks will be best.

No-one can tell you how many hours a day to study, because it depends on you. IMO the best way to study is Learn topic -> Practice textbook questions -> Practice exam questions -> repeat. Other methods are the Feynman technique (TL;DR Revise a topic, write it out as if you were teaching someone else, go back and revise more, then go back to your teaching and simplify / expand. This technique more useful at A-Level.)

Don't ask people on this website to teach you specific topics, its almost impossible via forum posts. Youtube videos / khan academy videos will be of better help. Alternatively hire a personal tutor.

Good luck on your journey, friend.
Thank you very much for your reply, it was really helpful.

I feel like because I’ve been out of education for so long it seems a daunting task to figure out where to start however, I’m sure I’ll get there with some sheer determination and hard work.

Again, thanks for taking the time to reply!
0
reply
HobbinsE
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by ConRog)
.The following year I will be doing a access course. With this in mind I’d like to start as soon as possible with teaching myself the fundamentals but I just don’t know where to start. I really want to achieve an A,A,A*(A* in maths) so I have a chance of getting into LSE.

Does anyone have any recommendations on how many hours a day I need to study and what resources are best?
If you’re doing an access course they aren’t graded like a levels. With access you either pass or not with 45 level 3 credits graded at either pass, merit or distinction. With each modules being worth 3, 6 or sometimes 9 credits.
If you’re aiming for places like LSE emailing them would be a good idea as some places request specific modules or certain grades for different modules.

As for hours of study when you get to the access course it’s very fast paced. I did access to science and had 9 hours of teaching a week and did about 3-4 hours extra at home per subject (I did biology, chemistry and physics) plus about 1/2 an hour per week for the 15 ungraded study skills module.
The A level revision guides and online resources are generally good for access as it’s the same level, I was advices to look at some higher university level books to help reach the high distinction grades I needed.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...y-Requirements
Here’s the link on requirements for access courses for LSE.
Last edited by HobbinsE; 2 years ago
0
reply
Den987
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by ConRog)
Thanks for your reply!

I’d say I was a combination of visual and auditory, that usually works for me. I generally need to work harder than everyone around me for things to stick. This is why I wanna get ahead of the game so I have the very best chance of getting the required grades.
Then diagrams and listening back to notes should work. But I would also recommend looking on YouTube, as they go over certain questions step by step. That, as well as past papers. Past papers are key. Relating to Maths, Chemistry, Biology, etc... I would recommend www.physicsandmathstutor.com for those. Best of luck!!!
Last edited by Den987; 2 years ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (3)
3.75%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (11)
13.75%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (14)
17.5%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (9)
11.25%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (29)
36.25%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (14)
17.5%

Watched Threads

View All