rHydEn_sLeeP
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So I started preparing for my A-level English Literature exam this year (I'm taking next year). Basically I've never taken literature before, and I'm at a lost for how to write my body paragraphs. And my teachers have no time to teach us this because they assumed we all know it. Anyone here can help with this? Just a general tip will be helpful because I have no idea where to start!! (':
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artful_lounger
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Generally, you want to use PEE(L) as a basic structure to begin with, which stands for "point, evidence, explain (link)". So, state the point you're trying to make in the paragraph, present the (textual) evidence for it, explain how the evidence supports your point, then link it into your overall essay structure/argument.

As a tool for analysing poetry and sometimes other literature, SLIME is also useful, which stands for "structure, language, interpretation, meaning, and effect". This gives you a basic list of things to look at for analysing. For structure you would consider the form of the work; for poetry then you would consider metre, the type of poem e.g. sonnet vs rhyming couplets, as well as possibly the layout of the poem if printed in a particular way; for other literature you would consider if it's e.g. a novel vs novella, or a play, you can also consider genre and for dramatic pieces, staging issues under this broadly. Language is standard stuff like alliteration, sibilance, onomatopoeia etc, interpretation and meaning should be fairly obvious (but don't just stick to intentionalism; consider other approaches to interpreting things, like postmodernist or queer theory readings), and (emotional) effect follows from that I suppose.

There's probably other approaches/formats you can use, but SLIME and PEE are usually a good starting point to make sure you hit the basic stuff you need to include.
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absolutelysprout
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PETAL can be good to start with- this is Point, Evidence, Technique, Analysis, Link (back to question) however at a-level you're generally not expected to use such structures and just write paragraphs fluidly without acronyms, but it's nice to have one just so you can keep your paragraphs concise.

my teachers also gave me this one recently: TWAAGE;
topic sentence- a mini thesis statement, which frames your argument
word- quotes, evidence
authorial methods- self explanatory.
argument- build your point and debate/offer alternate interpretations
genre/theme- how does this link to genre or theme (dependent on exam board)
evaluative comments- how does this all shape our understanding of the question
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Quick-use
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
teachers also gave me this one recently: TWAAGE;
topic sentence- a mini thesis statement, which frames your argument
word- quotes, evidence
authorial methods- self explanatory.
argument- build your point and debate/offer alternate interpretations
genre- how does this link to genre (not too sure if this is relevant for all exam boards)
evaluative comments- how does this all shape our understanding of the question
I wonder if the genre part could be substituted with themes for exam boards not focusing on the genre aspect as much? :fluffy:
Last edited by Quick-use; 1 year ago
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absolutelysprout
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(Original post by Quick-use)
I wonder if the genre part could be substituted with themes for exam boards not focusing on the genre aspect as much. :fluffy:
that's a good idea! i'll edit it in
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username4762440
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There is some excellent advice on this thread already. Slightly irrelevant, but I cannot recommend exemplar answers enough! I never had structure to my essays even though I had tons of knowledge, until I began reading others' essays. Reading and re-reading essays marked by examiners gives you the formula you need.
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