Why do millennials/gen z have more mental health issues than previous generations Watch

Lkathryn08
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This is NOT a diss on people for having mental health issue so don’t think that it is. I am 22 and suffer from anxiety which I have taken medication for so I promise I do not judge!

It just seems more apparent that our generation suffer more with mental health issues. I feel like most people I have spoke with, especially students have seen first hand some form of anxiety/depression.

I have a few theories:

1. Is it possible that there is now more awareness of these issues than previously? Potentially people death with these issues but they didn’t have a name then, it was just being ‘over-emotional’ or whatever. I think awareness may have helped more people identify they have a problem.

2. Grad jobs and grad schemes are so competitive and school appear to hammer home that you need to go to uni and do well to have any form of success or else you’re be a failure. It might have not been the intention for some teachers but i definitely felt this and thought that I couldn’t be successful without a degree, a grad job and then lots of money. I also feel like kids are pushed in this direction which might not necessarily be for them and then suffer the consequences because of it. The more and more students pushed in this direction, the more competitive it gets and the more stressful it becomes.

3. There’s a bit of a stigma that if you’re not working yourself to burn out levels then you’ll fail and you’re not working hard enough which goes hand in hand with the competitiveness. With social media especially, there are so many accounts popular with students, working their life away and not getting any sleep etc.... Also with social media everyone posts their successes and achievements and I feel like people will see this and feel like they have to do the same. Even though people won’t typically post the hard times and the stressful moments to get to that point.

I’m curious to see what other people’s thoughts on this is? Technology,social media and being able to access everything immediately or the fact we always got participation medals when we were growing up and we told we could all be amazing and achieve?
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username4355882
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tldr

But your first theory seems legit. It's not that our generation has more MH issues. It's just that we are more aware and vocal about it. And people care now so we talk and listen.
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Drewski
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Number 1 is the only valid reason.

Every generation has their thing to stress about, they might be trivial looking back, but it doesn't stop them being serious at the time, so I don't think you can argue grad scheme competition is that big a factor (especially when it's only a relatively small proportion of the population that go in for them in the first place).
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Lkathryn08
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(Original post by Drewski)
Number 1 is the only valid reason.

Every generation has their thing to stress about, they might be trivial looking back, but it doesn't stop them being serious at the time, so I don't think you can argue grad scheme competition is that big a factor (especially when it's only a relatively small proportion of the population that go in for them in the first place).
So you don’t think social media has any influence? Seeing the lives of perfect people with perfect bodies and Being extremely exposed to world of internet trolls who will do everything to make you feel the lowest of the low. I do think that social media could be a valid reason too.
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ThomH97
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Number 1 is true. You should have given the second half of number 3 its own point - social media showcasing all the successes of your peers as if it's run of the mill stuff, and hence you comparing that to your run of the mill day to day life and falling short.

I'd add another one too, advertising. We have people ever more skilled in making the public feel insecure without the product, and big data is only going to make that more powerful. Whilst one might argue that adults need to take responsibility for their own choices, we have such persuasive power aimed at children too, who have no chance protecting their minds from the psychologists and behaviour algorithms. You grow up being told you're inadequate without things, as this is the easiest way to get people to buy stuff.
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marinade
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(Original post by Lkathryn08)
1. Is it possible that there is now more awareness of these issues than previously? Potentially people death with these issues but they didn’t have a name then, it was just being ‘over-emotional’ or whatever. I think awareness may have helped more people identify they have a problem.

I’m curious to see what other people’s thoughts on this is? Technology,social media and being able to access everything immediately or the fact we always got participation medals when we were growing up and we told we could all be amazing and achieve?
There is vastly more awareness of it. I think mental health problems in previous generations was vastly under reported and where it was, it was largely kept secret within small circles of people. The consequences of reporting mental health are also a lot less serious (still massively long way to go).

There were all sorts of names in the past such as 'nerves'.

If I think back to pre-2015 there wasn't as much stuff on tv/the internet about anxiety. pre-2010 there but really not that much. Where I volunteer has seen a large change in people presenting themselves saying they have particular conditions.
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steamed-hams
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In my experience it was a cocktail of unhealthy habits. For example, drinking alcohol, too much caffeine, not eating a clean and balance diet, not exercising, heavy screen time (binge watching netflix, YT, porn, pointless internet browsing), not socialising much, not exiting comfort zone, not really doing anything productive at all. Then above that studying at Uni where its basically 2:1 or bust, accumulating sickening amounts of debt and being possibly unemployed at end.
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iodo345
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(Original post by Lkathryn08)
This is NOT a diss on people for having mental health issue so don’t think that it is. I am 22 and suffer from anxiety which I have taken medication for so I promise I do not judge!

It just seems more apparent that our generation suffer more with mental health issues. I feel like most people I have spoke with, especially students have seen first hand some form of anxiety/depression.

I have a few theories:

1. Is it possible that there is now more awareness of these issues than previously? Potentially people death with these issues but they didn’t have a name then, it was just being ‘over-emotional’ or whatever. I think awareness may have helped more people identify they have a problem.

2. Grad jobs and grad schemes are so competitive and school appear to hammer home that you need to go to uni and do well to have any form of success or else you’re be a failure. It might have not been the intention for some teachers but i definitely felt this and thought that I couldn’t be successful without a degree, a grad job and then lots of money. I also feel like kids are pushed in this direction which might not necessarily be for them and then suffer the consequences because of it. The more and more students pushed in this direction, the more competitive it gets and the more stressful it becomes.

3. There’s a bit of a stigma that if you’re not working yourself to burn out levels then you’ll fail and you’re not working hard enough which goes hand in hand with the competitiveness. With social media especially, there are so many accounts popular with students, working their life away and not getting any sleep etc.... Also with social media everyone posts their successes and achievements and I feel like people will see this and feel like they have to do the same. Even though people won’t typically post the hard times and the stressful moments to get to that point.

I’m curious to see what other people’s thoughts on this is? Technology,social media and being able to access everything immediately or the fact we always got participation medals when we were growing up and we told we could all be amazing and achieve?
1. I think this is the main issue - it also seems fashionable to self diagnose and brag about having depression or anxiety

2. Don't think this is as significant as the first point but I agree with this 100% too much emphasis on the value of a degree by schools leading to black or white success or failure thinking when applying to university. It is as if anything else is discouraged and too many people still have the idea that uni is the be all or end all of success in life. At the end a lot leave disillusioned not being able to find employment and in debt. I hate how A-level results day is also bigged up so much as well.

3. Social media is something other generations didn't have to deal with and I agree it adds to mental health problems through perfectionism, competition and narcissism
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HasanQ585
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I'm not convinced its just due to increased awareness of mental health issues; I reckon lazy lifestyles and social media contribute to the increase as well
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AngryRedhead
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I’d like to see empirical evidence that they do have more MH issues; although I suspect mental issues are more common amongst the older generations, they’ve just always had the attitude of “stiff upper lip” and get on with it rather than talking about it. Sometimes that can be fatal, as seen in the suicide rate of middle aged people
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