Ih246
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Hello, I am going to be applying to university this year to start in 2020. Currently I am debating whether to attend an undergraduate degree in medicine or psychology. I attend a spanish system school and after reviewing the entry requirements I should be able to get in to either course (at least with the grades criteria).

Initially I was planning on perusing medicine, but after hearing about the application process (entry exams, interviews...) I began to feel like I was not prepared to try and enter as I am only 16 at the moment. And since I was planning on going on to study psychiatry, my school suggested to investigate a psychology degree. This summer I visited universities and got information on the different psychology courses which do sound interesting and I feel like it may be something I would enjoy. But there is still a part of me that thinks I may be making the wrong choice.

As for the careers I am more interested in therapy as I find it quite fascinating, and I have heard that many psychiatrist actually don’t administrate therapy as such. This was one of the reasons why I was leaning more towards psychology.

But I have some concerns, mainly job prospects (some people suggest that becoming a clinical psychologist is too competitive or underpaid). But I also don’t want to just base my decision on salary as I would rather enjoy my career.

If anyone could give me some advice on how I should make this decision or if anyone went though a similar situation I would really appreciate to get some different perspectives. Right now I am leaning more towards psychology, but hearing other people’s experiences I think would help me make up my mind.
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LuigiMario
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Psychology is a great first degree, there are certainly possible paths to medicine later - as an option. In fact, almost any first degree could later lead to the medical course, if you keep your science and analytical skills up...

Psychology is nowadays often presented in two forms a BA degree (concentrating more on the psychology & sociology) and or a BSc degree, bit more Psychology & scientific neurology connected. Much exciting new research in neurology & brain imaging, is allowing previous sociologic studies and theories to be actually experimented and live tested , with "live" brain imaging MRI or PET, confirming or not , any particular theory.

Medicine is much harder to get into, you'll need the BMAT or UCAT pass, the lots of top grades, the related 'hobbies' & volunteer work, it is actually worth it, as you'd probably earn twice to four times as much as a UK Doctor of medicine, as compared to a UK Psychology degree holder (Doctorate in Psychology is supposed to only be applied for after many years post-graduate experience)

both interesting, maybe apply for 3 x A100 , 2 x Psych as backup to A100, at UCAS then all ten Irish CAO places in addition?
read widely, mine is just a random opinion
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anonymoussse
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u need medicine for psychiatry
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Ih246
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Psychology is a great first degree, there are certainly possible paths to medicine later - as an option. In fact, almost any first degree could later lead to the medical course, if you keep your science and analytical skills up...

Psychology is nowadays often presented in two forms a BA degree (concentrating more on the psychology & sociology) and or a BSc degree, bit more Psychology & scientific neurology connected. Much exciting new research in neurology & brain imaging, is allowing previous sociologic studies and theories to be actually experimented and live tested , with "live" brain imaging MRI or PET, confirming or not , any particular theory.

Medicine is much harder to get into, you'll need the BMAT or UCAT pass, the lots of top grades, the related 'hobbies' & volunteer work, it is actually worth it, as you'd probably earn twice to four times as much as a UK Doctor of medicine, as compared to a UK Psychology degree holder (Doctorate in Psychology is supposed to only be applied for after many years post-graduate experience)

both interesting, maybe apply for 3 x A100 , 2 x Psych as backup to A100, at UCAS then all ten Irish CAO places in addition?
read widely, mine is just a random opinion
Thanks for responding! Maybe I could consider doing psychology as an undergraduate and then entering medicine feeling more confident and having relevant work experience.
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Ih246
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(Original post by anonymoussse)
u need medicine for psychiatry
I know initially, before considering psychology, I was planning on doing medicine and later specializing in psychiatry
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returnmigrant
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There is a difference between being a Psychologist and a Psychiatrist - this is a US website but it explains the difference very well : https://www.allpsychologyschools.com...vs-psychiatry/, or the NHS website goes into more UK-specific detail : https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...-psychotherapy

You might also be interested in a joint subject degree such as 'Psychology and Neuroscience' - this is the new course 4 year course at Bristol : https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/unde...-neuroscience/
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random_matt
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BA and BSC are the same for most places, you are not getting away from statistics which used to be one area BA used to get away with.
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Ih246
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(Original post by random_matt)
BA and BSC are the same for most places, you are not getting away from statistics which used to be one area BA used to get away with.
I enjoy maths and science a lot so that’s not a down side for me. I’ve also elected to take statistics in my last year of school just to get some practice.
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Ih246
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
There is a difference between being a Psychologist and a Psychiatrist - this is a US website but it explains the difference very well : https://www.allpsychologyschools.com...vs-psychiatry/, or the NHS website goes into more UK-specific detail : https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...-psychotherapy

You might also be interested in a joint subject degree such as 'Psychology and Neuroscience' - this is the new course 4 year course at Bristol : https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/unde...-neuroscience/
Thanks for the help I’ll check these pages out now.
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chazwomaq
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As other have mentioned, if you want to do psychiatry, you must study medicine and qualify as a doctor.

It's true that psychiatrists tend to do less talking therapy than clinical psychologists, and more medical management and diagnosis etc..

Medicine is a very competitive, highly respected degree that is highly employable. It can lead you in many different directions as a career.

Psychology is a much less competitive degree that is not so highly employable. Being a clinical psychologist is good and decently paid (much less than medical doctor though) but incredibly competitive - more so than medicine. Only a minority of psychology graduates will become professional psychologists.

The biggest difference is this: if you pass a medical degree you will get a job in your field if you want it. If you pass your psychology degree, nothing is guaranteed.

There is very little comparison between the degrees. If you have the option and interest in both I would 100% choose medicine.
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Ih246
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Hello, I am going to be applying to university this year to start in 2020. Currently I am debating whether to attend an undergraduate degree in medicine or psychology. I attend a spanish system school and after reviewing the entry requirements I should be able to get in to either course (at least with the grades criteria).

Initially I was planning on perusing medicine, but after hearing about the application process (entry exams, interviews...) I began to feel like I was not prepared to try and enter as I am only 16 at the moment. And since I was planning on going on to study psychiatry, my school suggested to investigate a psychology degree. This summer I visited universities and got information on the different psychology courses which do sound interesting and I feel like it may be something I would enjoy. But there is still a part of me that thinks I may be making the wrong choice.

As for the careers I am more interested in therapy as I find it quite fascinating, and I have heard that many psychiatrist actually don’t administrate therapy as such. This was one of the reasons why I was leaning more towards psychology.

But I have some concerns, mainly job prospects (some people suggest that becoming a clinical psychologist is too competitive or underpaid). But I also don’t want to just base my decision on salary as I would rather enjoy my career.

If anyone could give me some advice on how I should make this decision or if anyone went though a similar situation I would really appreciate to get some different perspectives. Right now I am leaning more towards psychology, but hearing other people’s experiences I think would help me make up my mind.
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khana2424
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personally, i would do medicine as I believe there is more opportunities for medicine than pyscology.
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ReliableEssays
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Medicine has more opportunities than psychology. Psychology is more or less a branch of medicine
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SAPPHIRE368
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If you study psychology from a well reputed university and do well then theres no saying to how much you can earn .
I do think that 16 is a very young age to start medicine ... how long is the med course .....have you finished your foundation studies ?
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Angury
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(Original post by Ih246)
x
Have you done any research/work experience/spoken to medics about what a career in medicine is like?
You seem to have a good idea about what Psychology involves and Clinical Psychology seems to really attract you which is good.

Is it just Psychology you enjoy or you enjoy the rest of the sciences as well? Just remember that if you do study medicine, Psychiatry will only make up a very small portion of your 5-6 years of medical school & first two years working as a Foundation doctor.

Also bear in mind that Graduate Entry Medicine is much more competitive than Undergraduate Medicine.
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Ghotay
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As above, being a clinical psychologist is much more competitive than getting into medicine. It is sadly an industry standard to do a lengthy unpaid internship to even be considered for a job.

Similarly, graduate entry medicine after a psychology degree is much more competitive than the undergraduate course.

There are psychiatrists who subspecialise in psychotherapy, so that is definitely a route you could go down. Here is some information on it from the Royal College of Psychiatrists https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/become-a-p.../psychotherapy
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king axolotl
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If you are interested in pursuing medicine, then you might have to wait for two years. I'm sure I saw that some medical schools only allow people who are 18 by the time they start the course. Don't take this as gospel though because I'm not actually pursuing medicine I just have read a few things lol.
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Ih246
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Im 16 now, and the Spanish system works differently from the UK (calendar year rather than academic) so I will be 17 when I start in 2020 but 18 shortly then after. So I will only be 16 through the application process.
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by ReliableEssays)
Psychology is more or less a branch of medicine
No, it is not.
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Ih246
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(Original post by Angury)
Have you done any research/work experience/spoken to medics about what a career in medicine is like?
You seem to have a good idea about what Psychology involves and Clinical Psychology seems to really attract you which is good.

Is it just Psychology you enjoy or you enjoy the rest of the sciences as well? Just remember that if you do study medicine, Psychiatry will only make up a very small portion of your 5-6 years of medical school & first two years working as a Foundation doctor.

Also bear in mind that Graduate Entry Medicine is much more competitive than Undergraduate Medicine.
I haven’t spoken to any medics so far but maybe that would be a good idea to get more information. I am interested in sciences in general but I am more attracted to certain areas.
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