JessThomas6
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I'm currently studying a BSc (Hons) in Criminology at Bath Spa University, and will hopefully graduate next year with a first. I am looking into going into law, by doing a conversion course, either the GDL (however this seems very intense to me), a qualifying law MA at other universities, or the LLB Graduate Law at Exeter. However, I don't know which is the best route for me to go down? I know BSU isn't the best university in the UK, and so may put me at a disadvantage going into the process. Any advice on choosing a course, and universities to study at, would be appreciated!
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harrysbar
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
I'm currently studying a BSc (Hons) in Criminology at Bath Spa University, and will hopefully graduate next year with a first. I am looking into going into law, by doing a conversion course, either the GDL (however this seems very intense to me), a qualifying law MA at other universities, or the LLB Graduate Law at Exeter. However, I don't know which is the best route for me to go down? I know BSU isn't the best university in the UK, and so may put me at a disadvantage going into the process. Any advice on choosing a course, and universities to study at, would be appreciated!
Do you want to be a solicitor? If so, the quickest route would be to do the GDL (Law conversion course) followed by the LPC and then you would hopefully be able to begin a training contract. Your First class degree will look brilliant on applications but what are your A levels like, since a lot of the bigger firms have minimum requirements of AAB-BBB?
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Notoriety
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It's a bit shoddy, ain't it.

Extremely good grades at BSU or a bunch of extracurriculars and work experience could make up for it.
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JessThomas6
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Do you want to be a solicitor? If so, the quickest route would be to do the GDL (Law conversion course) followed by the LPC and then you would hopefully be able to begin a training contract. Your First class degree will look brilliant on applications but what are your A levels like, since a lot of the bigger firms have minimum requirements of AAB-BBB?
I got AAB at A-Level (going to BSU is a hard one to explain - my predicted were a lot worse than this, I got a remark but by the time it came back I had already started at BSU)
I am aiming to work at my parent's office, however want the qualifications - so I'm not massively concerned about the big firms, it's not an aim of mine to be a junior working 100 hour weeks with no hope of massive amounts of progression
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JessThomas6
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(Original post by Notoriety)
It's a bit shoddy, ain't it.

Extremely good grades at BSU or a bunch of extracurriculars and work experience could make up for it.
My current lowest grade was a 65 in first year, besides that my grades range from 72-86 depending on the module, and I have work experience at an office, and have done some extra curricular activities - is it worth me applying?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
My current lowest grade was a 65 in first year, besides that my grades range from 72-86 depending on the module, and I have work experience at an office, and have done some extra curricular activities - is it worth me applying?
You're very modest, course it's worth you applying! What do you think Noto and JohanGRK?
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JessThomas6
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(Original post by harrysbar)
You're very modest, course it's worth you applying! What do you think Noto and JohanGRK?
Sorry to drag up the old thread, but in the last week I've got a placement at a small law firm in my town, where I'm helping with typing up dictations, office assistant, as well as putting together bundles for counsels on criminal cases. Next week I'll be covering illness and helping out with probate - obviously it's not a long placement (4 weeks), but would this be enough to put on my applications?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
Sorry to drag up the old thread, but in the last week I've got a placement at a small law firm in my town, where I'm helping with typing up dictations, office assistant, as well as putting together bundles for counsels on criminal cases. Next week I'll be covering illness and helping out with probate - obviously it's not a long placement (4 weeks), but would this be enough to put on my applications?
You've got AAB at A level, relevant work experience, on track for a First, you seem like a strong applicant. What are you going to apply for, the GDL?
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JessThomas6
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(Original post by harrysbar)
You've got AAB at A level, relevant work experience, on track for a First, you seem like a strong applicant. What are you going to apply for, the GDL?
At the moment, I'm looking at the GDL at some south west universities (ideally Plymouth or Exeter as I could commute to both of those!), the graduate Law degree at Exeter, as well as a qualifying law masters in Liverpool (but that's less likely at the moment as I'm unsure about moving so far away - ideally I would like to stay home to save money), as well as looking into possibly doing a distance learning course, however, again, it's one I'm not 100% sure on. I'm going to start going to open days in October for the courses I'm interested in, and seek advice from my Business Law lecturer (there's a business law module offered in second and third year, I've taken the second year module and got a 72, and then am going to take the third year module) as to exactly which courses would suit me, where is best to apply etc etc
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harrysbar
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
At the moment, I'm looking at the GDL at some south west universities (ideally Plymouth or Exeter as I could commute to both of those!), the graduate Law degree at Exeter, as well as a qualifying law masters in Liverpool (but that's less likely at the moment as I'm unsure about moving so far away - ideally I would like to stay home to save money), as well as looking into possibly doing a distance learning course, however, again, it's one I'm not 100% sure on. I'm going to start going to open days in October for the courses I'm interested in, and seek advice from my Business Law lecturer (there's a business law module offered in second and third year, I've taken the second year module and got a 72, and then am going to take the third year module) as to exactly which courses would suit me, where is best to apply etc etc
It's a good idea to start going to Open days, obviously the Graduate Law degree would take an extra year to get you to the same place but it's still a good option if you are happy with the extra time/money it would entail. I think you are overestimating how hard it will be to get onto these courses and I don't see any problems with you getting onto either course, just because you chose to go to Bath Spa.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
I am aiming to work at my parent's office,
Is this a solicitors' firm or a commercial business.

If this is a solicitors' firm, is it the sort of firm where there would be an expectation that you would succeed them eventually or a firm where you would have to take your chances with other junior members of staff?
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JessThomas6
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Is this a solicitors' firm or a commercial business.

If this is a solicitors' firm, is it the sort of firm where there would be an expectation that you would succeed them eventually or a firm where you would have to take your chances with other junior members of staff?
Solicitors' firm where I would be expected to succeed them - however it practices conveyancing, probate, criminal law etc., so there are many areas I could specialise in
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
Solicitors' firm where I would be expected to succeed them - however it practices conveyancing, probate, criminal law etc., so there are many areas I could specialise in
I don’t think it matters too much where you do your GDL but you should choose your LPC with care. Since your parents qualified, the profession has become much more specialised and training has changed to accommodate that. However, you may as a very newly qualified solicitor be sitting there doing probate when, in the absence of your parents, the Crown Court clerk comes in with a tricky question. You don’t want a LPC with a heavy emphasis on huge commercial deals.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
I don’t think it matters too much where you do your GDL but you should choose your LPC with care. Since your parents qualified, the profession has become much more specialised and training has changed to accommodate that. However, you may as a very newly qualified solicitor be sitting there doing probate when, in the absence of your parents, the Crown Court clerk comes in with a tricky question. You don’t want a LPC with a heavy emphasis on huge commercial deals.
Which LPCs would you suggest OP should avoid and which would be ideal?
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Which LPCs would you suggest OP should avoid and which would be ideal?
I suspect that one might want to go to a provider that offers modules that are (highly) relevant to their area of practice
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Notoriety
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
I suspect that one might want to go to a provider that offers modules that are (highly) relevant to their area of practice
I'm asking to determine that there are providers who deny students access to criminal/basic law in place of commercial. It doesn't seem the likely candidates ULaw and BPP do this -- you have plenty of options and can choose to go crim heavy or corporate heavy. I haven't looked at LPC structure a lot, so don't know what other ones are like or what providers nulli's trainees have had issues with.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Notoriety)
I'm asking to determine that there are providers who deny students access to criminal/basic law in place of commercial. It doesn't seem the likely candidates ULaw and BPP do this -- you have plenty of options and can choose to go crim heavy or corporate heavy. I haven't looked at LPC structure a lot, so don't know what other ones are like or what providers nulli's trainees have had issues with.
This isn’t an issue that has occurred in practice with our firm.

Johan is right about what I was suggesting.

I haven’t looked at every LPC provider but these issues arise with ULaw.

The July Accelerated LPC only offers a very “corporate” LPC. The advanced criminal law, family law, immigration, personal injury and private client electives aren’t available.

Likewise the January start conventional LPC doesn’t offer advanced crime, offers PI only at Birmingham and Manchester and doesn’t offer private client at those two locations.

For the September conventional LPC, supposedly all 15 electives are on offer at all locations but there are weasel words in the marketing material about availability being subject to demand and timetabling constraints. I wouldn’t be confident about all electives being on offer every year at the smaller ULaw locations like Bristol, Exeter, Norwich and Reading.
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hevarization
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
I'm currently studying a BSc (Hons) in Criminology at Bath Spa University, and will hopefully graduate next year with a first. I am looking into going into law, by doing a conversion course, either the GDL (however this seems very intense to me), a qualifying law MA at other universities, or the LLB Graduate Law at Exeter. However, I don't know which is the best route for me to go down? I know BSU isn't the best university in the UK, and so may put me at a disadvantage going into the process. Any advice on choosing a course, and universities to study at, would be appreciated!
Hi Jess, my sister studied law at a lower ranking university and a few years after graduating has an excellent solicitor job due to talent, hard work and her entrepreneurial approach. You strike me as someone who could do this too. Depending on what type of law you want go in to, your graduate university will not necessarily hinder your aspirations and goals. Good luck with your final year.
By the way, what do you think of the Criminology course at Bath Spa University? I know someone who is interested in applying for that course.
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JessThomas6
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(Original post by hevarization)
Hi Jess, my sister studied law at a lower ranking university and a few years after graduating has an excellent solicitor job due to talent, hard work and her entrepreneurial approach. You strike me as someone who could do this too. Depending on what type of law you want go in to, your graduate university will not necessarily hinder your aspirations and goals. Good luck with your final year.
By the way, what do you think of the Criminology course at Bath Spa University? I know someone who is interested in applying for that course.
Thank you!
I love it - even though it's a "lower ranking" university the course content is the same as any other crim degree, and the lecturers are so passionate and helpful - I've honestly not had the same support from any other modules leaders as I have from the crim ones. Due to the focus on "creative" subjects, you get a lot of freedom in your module choices, so I have been able to take law modules, psychology modules, sociology modules - meaning you can tailor your degree to your wants and needs. I had a lot of personal problems in second year and the department were really good at making accommodations and helping me out wherever they could! You still need to work hard though, even if it isn't a top uni
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hevarization
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(Original post by JessThomas6)
Thank you!
I love it - even though it's a "lower ranking" university the course content is the same as any other crim degree, and the lecturers are so passionate and helpful - I've honestly not had the same support from any other modules leaders as I have from the crim ones. Due to the focus on "creative" subjects, you get a lot of freedom in your module choices, so I have been able to take law modules, psychology modules, sociology modules - meaning you can tailor your degree to your wants and needs. I had a lot of personal problems in second year and the department were really good at making accommodations and helping me out wherever they could! You still need to work hard though, even if it isn't a top uni
Thanks for the info. This is so encouraging! It is my daughter who is applying and it sounds like a good choice given the creative aspects, choice and support given by the lecturers. She also wants to go into Law!
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