Zeffin_Noler
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Hello. I had applied for a BSc in Theoretical Physics from the University of Manchester, but as my grades were a bit short of their entrance qualifications, I did not receive a place, but instead, I was offered to apply for the BSc with a foundation programme. I wanted to know whether this is worth undertaking; whether this would cause some hindrance in the future as it is not as good as a direct admission into a BSc course. Furthermore, I have heard that this course is usually meant for those from a somewhat weak academic background, and whether I would be a right fit for this, since albeit my IB grades weren't good enough, they weren't entirely bad either.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Zeffin_Noler)
Hello. I had applied for a BSc in Theoretical Physics from the University of Manchester, but as my grades were a bit short of their entrance qualifications, I did not receive a place, but instead, I was offered to apply for the BSc with a foundation programme. I wanted to know whether this is worth undertaking; whether this would cause some hindrance in the future as it is not as good as a direct admission into a BSc course. Furthermore, I have heard that this course is usually meant for those from a somewhat weak academic background, and whether I would be a right fit for this, since albeit my IB grades weren't good enough, they weren't entirely bad either.
You have been offered this course because Manchester believe that you are a promising student, but do not have good enough IB results to qualify for a place directly onto their BSc Theoretical Physics course. It is a way to get into Manchester uni, if that is somewhere you really want to go, knowing that you will be able to progress onto their degree course next year, as long as you are successful in the Foundation year.

However, you don't have to accept this offer. I understand that you have 5 days in which to decide, so there is nothing stopping you from contacting other unis in Clearing to see if anywhere else could give you a better offer, such as direct entry onto their BSc course. Or do you have an Insurance uni?
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Zeffin_Noler
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Hello. Thank you for your information. I got rejected from my insurance choice, (Uni of Edinburgh) because I exceeded their entrance requirements in all but one subject, HL maths, where I got a 5 instead of the 6 they wanted. I looked up available courses in Clearing, but observed that most of the universities require a score of 6 in maths for admission into their physics course.
Also, regarding the Foundation Year programme, I have a slight reservation about it, primarily if it might appear as a stain on my resumé while applying for further education to other universities, (I plan on carrying out research into physics) since it is obviously not as impressive as a direct admission into the BSc course.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Zeffin_Noler)
Hello. Thank you for your information. I got rejected from my insurance choice, (Uni of Edinburgh) because I exceeded their entrance requirements in all but one subject, HL maths, where I got a 5 instead of the 6 they wanted. I looked up available courses in Clearing, but observed that most of the universities require a score of 6 in maths for admission into their physics course.
Also, regarding the Foundation Year programme, I have a slight reservation about it, primarily if it might appear as a stain on my resumé while applying for further education to other universities, (I plan on carrying out research into physics) since it is obviously not as impressive as a direct admission into the BSc course.
I'm not sure it would even be clear that you did a foundation year, couldn't you present it on your CV more like a 4 year BSc that resulted in a good degree? If any employer did pick up on the fact that the degree at Manchester is normally 3 years not 4, you would be honest about the first year being used to bring your maths skills up to the desired level. You could end up doing postgraduate studies in this subject - at Manchester or elsewhere - I really can't see employers caring too much about how you got onto your undergraduate course years ago
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EleaGR
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Hi, @Zeffin_Noler! You could take a look at University of Leeds for physics with a 5 in HL maths. They ask for 35, 5/5 in HL Maths and Physics for IB students. They are in Clearing and they seem to be lenient enough, as they accepted my son with 30, 5/4 He did not go through clearing, it was his insurance choice.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by EleaGR)
Hi, Zeffin_Noler! You could take a look at University of Leeds for physics with a 5 in HL maths. They ask for 35, 5/5 in HL Maths and Physics for IB students. They are in Clearing and they seem to be lenient enough, as they accepted my son with 30, 5/4 He did not go through clearing, it was his insurance choice.
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