Any tips for students going into Year 11? Watch

miasxra
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I go into year 11 in September, Anything I should know, any tips?
Thank you x
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tvkradi22
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Long message coming up. This is from a shared document that my friends and I put together:

General Tips:
PAST PAPERS ARE THE KEY!!! IGCSEs are a course that require not only knowledge, but also specific paper-based skills that are built by practicing all the past papers you can get your hands on.
Get good revision guide, not a few weeks before exams, but as long before as possible
Pay attention. Seriously. This will really help you later on.
Make notes against syllabus
Constantly review your work, don’t cram: trust me, you won’t have the brain capacity to cram everything, and your work will stick better in your brain if you’ve done it very a long period of time
Multiple choice papers: practice!!! This will help you get the critical skills you need to see past any tricks put in there to throw you off
Don’t cheat for mocks by doing the most recent past papers: let them be a fair indicator of where you’re at
Don’t relax after mock exams! Keep practicing!
Work out your time management for exams
Study methods: do what works for YOU, and don’t be scared to try different methods, just maybe do it well before the exams.
Don’t dismiss mark schemes: this is how you get to know your examiners and see what they want. Mark as strictly as they would, don’t assume that they would accept your answer just because you think it’s valid.
Don’t depend solely on the teachers to spoon-feed you; be independent and supplement your knowledge with extra and independent work
Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you are in doubt
Be an active learner; passive learning will not help you much later (basically, take part in lessons, engage your brain)

During exams:
Don’t become frustrated and discouraged if one or two exams don’t go as planned; chances are they didn’t really go as badly as you think, and you don’t want dwelling on them to ruin other exams
Take breaks once in a while and treat yourself: don’t burn out
Stress is normal: we get it, IGCSEs are tough
PROOFREAD YOUR PAPERS AFTER YOU’VE DONE THEM

Chemistry:
trust your teacher when she tells you that even though you can’t see the big picture now, you will in the end
Paper 6 (if you are doing it): Learn how to do those 6 mark questions where you have to write an experiment, and practice
Remember that the multiple choice results will multiply the most in the weighting process (ask your teacher if you don’t know what this is), so make those marks count

French:
have a wide vocabulary
Practice listening papers, and try to speak french during class, this is the best way to learn a foreign language: by immersing yourself in it
Don’t delay getting a topic for orals: as soon as Madame tells you to find one, do it and learn it well
Listen to french music, with lyric videos if you can
Watch french language movies, they’re designed for English speaking people and have English subtitles, but hearing French spoken by first- language- french people will improve your accent

Geography:
Remember that you’ll eventually have to know those skills for Paper 2, so take a little bit of time to learnt them well: that paper contains lots of marks that are easily gained with some basic knowledge and practice
Constantly review case studies and do them right in the beginning as this will save you a lot of frustration and work
Paper 4: study mark schemes, as a lot of answers are so obvious that they are easily forgotten or neglected.

History:
Get revision guide
Do past papers (and get them marked): this will build the writing skills you need
Paper 1: what worked best for me was planning all three questions as soon as you’ve chosen them as, trust me, as soon as you get to that third Depth Study question, your brain will be tired, so get all your ideas down while their fresh
Paper 2: practice practice practice practice practice practice. Seriously. Practice. It is a skills paper, after all
Paper 4: look at past papers; there is a pattern to the types of questions that are asked. Make lists to learn under each type (eg: Hitler consolidation of power; why did the Weimar Republic fail…) Questions repeat themselves.

Maths:
Practice as many past papers as possible

Music:
Review everything, all the time
Dedicate a lot of your time to your coursework: this will have to be handed in first and that deadline will creep up on you faster than you expect
Learn how each of the different instruments sound, as that will be a significant skill that will be required of you in the exam
Keep in mind that you will only hear the extract four times (and in the setwork only twice) so underline keywords in questions and mentally assign a question to each time it is heard
For part C in the exam, go ahead and do the questions that you can without listening (eg: intervals, key, etc…) as soon as you’ve read through the questions
Listen to the setwork piece as often as possible, especially towards the exam. Start it from a random place and try to find it on the score

Language:
Practice
expand vocabulary: ambitious vocabulary (eg: what I did was make a list of ten fancy words the night before the exam and as soon as I opened that paper)
Don’t write over the word limit in the summary question in Paper 2

Literature:
Get as many different views as possible and combine them
Be critical in your responses: analyse everything that relates to the question and explain every point you bring up with relevant quotes
Do not avoid writing those essays: they build valuable writing skills, however much you may hate them
Read the question, and don’t analyse everything when the question only really wants one thing
Read the setwork to the end, even if your teacher doesn’t finish it with you.
Attempt a non-contextual question (question without extract) in class at least once so that you keep your options open in the exam. (The reason a lot of people didn’t do them is because they had never done anything like it before)
Don’t feature spot and bring up every thing you see without saying why it was used. At the start, plan by writing down what you can see that is relevant to the question and number them in importance. Choose the best ones and go into depth.
Sometimes it works to go at the poem or extract chronologically, starting at line one and ending at the end. However, this depends on the question: if it is a question on how the mood changes throughout the piece this approach would be more logical; but if the question was about literary devices start with the most prominent device using quotes from all over.

Physics:
Make a list of all of the formulae and what they mean
Learn and understand electricity: this is quite a difficult topic and will make up two questions in the exam
Paper 6 (if you are doing): Practice and learn how to do those 7 mark design questions; learn exactly what the examiners will award marks for (there are easy marks in that question if you know what they want)
Remember that the multiple choice results will multiply the most in the weighting process (ask your teacher if you don’t know what this is), so make those marks count
If you don’t understand something in the lesson even after thinking about it, ask the teacher to explain it as the chances are either that others also don’t understand or that said other can explain to you
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redmeercat
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Don't worry about what everyone else is doing... People will say that they're revising none or loads, but it probably isn't true, whatever they say. Do a little every day and you'll be fine
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epicnm
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Thanks for this!
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anonymoussse
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finish all past papers before u sit the exam.

all ur subjects are important. aim for a* in every subject
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tvkradi22
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(Original post by anonymoussse)
finish all past papers before u sit the exam.
Yesss!! At least, all the newest ones. You'll (hopefully) never have to use them again, so use 'em all!!
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Elsmok
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dont worry. it is just as bad as everyone says it is.
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miasxra
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(Original post by tvkradi22)
Long message coming up. This is from a shared document that my friends and I put together:

General Tips:
PAST PAPERS ARE THE KEY!!! IGCSEs are a course that require not only knowledge, but also specific paper-based skills that are built by practicing all the past papers you can get your hands on.
Get good revision guide, not a few weeks before exams, but as long before as possible
Pay attention. Seriously. This will really help you later on.
Make notes against syllabus
Constantly review your work, don’t cram: trust me, you won’t have the brain capacity to cram everything, and your work will stick better in your brain if you’ve done it very a long period of time
Multiple choice papers: practice!!! This will help you get the critical skills you need to see past any tricks put in there to throw you off
Don’t cheat for mocks by doing the most recent past papers: let them be a fair indicator of where you’re at
Don’t relax after mock exams! Keep practicing!
Work out your time management for exams
Study methods: do what works for YOU, and don’t be scared to try different methods, just maybe do it well before the exams.
Don’t dismiss mark schemes: this is how you get to know your examiners and see what they want. Mark as strictly as they would, don’t assume that they would accept your answer just because you think it’s valid.
Don’t depend solely on the teachers to spoon-feed you; be independent and supplement your knowledge with extra and independent work
Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you are in doubt
Be an active learner; passive learning will not help you much later (basically, take part in lessons, engage your brain)

During exams:
Don’t become frustrated and discouraged if one or two exams don’t go as planned; chances are they didn’t really go as badly as you think, and you don’t want dwelling on them to ruin other exams
Take breaks once in a while and treat yourself: don’t burn out
Stress is normal: we get it, IGCSEs are tough
PROOFREAD YOUR PAPERS AFTER YOU’VE DONE THEM

Chemistry:
trust your teacher when she tells you that even though you can’t see the big picture now, you will in the end
Paper 6 (if you are doing it): Learn how to do those 6 mark questions where you have to write an experiment, and practice
Remember that the multiple choice results will multiply the most in the weighting process (ask your teacher if you don’t know what this is), so make those marks count

French:
have a wide vocabulary
Practice listening papers, and try to speak french during class, this is the best way to learn a foreign language: by immersing yourself in it
Don’t delay getting a topic for orals: as soon as Madame tells you to find one, do it and learn it well
Listen to french music, with lyric videos if you can
Watch french language movies, they’re designed for English speaking people and have English subtitles, but hearing French spoken by first- language- french people will improve your accent

Geography:
Remember that you’ll eventually have to know those skills for Paper 2, so take a little bit of time to learnt them well: that paper contains lots of marks that are easily gained with some basic knowledge and practice
Constantly review case studies and do them right in the beginning as this will save you a lot of frustration and work
Paper 4: study mark schemes, as a lot of answers are so obvious that they are easily forgotten or neglected.

History:
Get revision guide
Do past papers (and get them marked): this will build the writing skills you need
Paper 1: what worked best for me was planning all three questions as soon as you’ve chosen them as, trust me, as soon as you get to that third Depth Study question, your brain will be tired, so get all your ideas down while their fresh
Paper 2: practice practice practice practice practice practice. Seriously. Practice. It is a skills paper, after all
Paper 4: look at past papers; there is a pattern to the types of questions that are asked. Make lists to learn under each type (eg: Hitler consolidation of power; why did the Weimar Republic fail…) Questions repeat themselves.

Maths:
Practice as many past papers as possible

Music:
Review everything, all the time
Dedicate a lot of your time to your coursework: this will have to be handed in first and that deadline will creep up on you faster than you expect
Learn how each of the different instruments sound, as that will be a significant skill that will be required of you in the exam
Keep in mind that you will only hear the extract four times (and in the setwork only twice) so underline keywords in questions and mentally assign a question to each time it is heard
For part C in the exam, go ahead and do the questions that you can without listening (eg: intervals, key, etc…) as soon as you’ve read through the questions
Listen to the setwork piece as often as possible, especially towards the exam. Start it from a random place and try to find it on the score

Language:
Practice
expand vocabulary: ambitious vocabulary (eg: what I did was make a list of ten fancy words the night before the exam and as soon as I opened that paper)
Don’t write over the word limit in the summary question in Paper 2

Literature:
Get as many different views as possible and combine them
Be critical in your responses: analyse everything that relates to the question and explain every point you bring up with relevant quotes
Do not avoid writing those essays: they build valuable writing skills, however much you may hate them
Read the question, and don’t analyse everything when the question only really wants one thing
Read the setwork to the end, even if your teacher doesn’t finish it with you.
Attempt a non-contextual question (question without extract) in class at least once so that you keep your options open in the exam. (The reason a lot of people didn’t do them is because they had never done anything like it before)
Don’t feature spot and bring up every thing you see without saying why it was used. At the start, plan by writing down what you can see that is relevant to the question and number them in importance. Choose the best ones and go into depth.
Sometimes it works to go at the poem or extract chronologically, starting at line one and ending at the end. However, this depends on the question: if it is a question on how the mood changes throughout the piece this approach would be more logical; but if the question was about literary devices start with the most prominent device using quotes from all over.

Physics:
Make a list of all of the formulae and what they mean
Learn and understand electricity: this is quite a difficult topic and will make up two questions in the exam
Paper 6 (if you are doing): Practice and learn how to do those 7 mark design questions; learn exactly what the examiners will award marks for (there are easy marks in that question if you know what they want)
Remember that the multiple choice results will multiply the most in the weighting process (ask your teacher if you don’t know what this is), so make those marks count
If you don’t understand something in the lesson even after thinking about it, ask the teacher to explain it as the chances are either that others also don’t understand or that said other can explain to you
Thank you so much!
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miasxra
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Thank you!
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b3kk4050703
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Don’t worry about what your friends are doing revision wise and socially. You need to focus on studies because it is the last push a couple of months and you will have the longest break ever to spend with friends. I am by no means saying don’t do anything social because you should.
I spent everyday revising for 2 hours then I would go on my phone or on a weekend me and my friends would spend Saturday afternoon together. And have a bit of a girly afternoon. If your friends don’t distract you then you could have a revision session like once a week together.
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tigress22
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Make sure you understand topics this year as you go along, if you don't understand a method or piece of information then ask a teacher even if it means spending 10 minutes of lunch e.t.c. Don't leave all of the little bits that you don't get until revision or it can easily become overwhelming!

Also, if teachers are offering revision clubs where they take you through things then go to them! (But in balance- you want to save free time too) Getting taught in smaller groups can be really helpful and a break from reading through a textbook. Ppl in my year always gave up on revision clubs the month before, so this can be a great time to go. I got hours of 1 to 1 tuition only a week before the exams and it made such a difference.

Lastly, if you have study leave, then often you can go and find teachers during the time you would usually have your lessons with them. This is another great opportunity to get 1 to 1 tuition without paying for a tutor! This works for during exam season too.

Good luck with your exams! And most importantly surround yourself with people who are going to support you and who you can relax around. Work hard and that's all you can do!
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StevenObalawonga
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(Original post by miasxra)
I go into year 11 in September, Anything I should know, any tips?
Thank you x
don't underestimate the power of cramming the whole syllabus in one night
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tvkradi22
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(Original post by StevenObalawonga)
don't underestimate the power of cramming the whole syllabus in one night
Pleeeeeeeeeeease do not cram the syllabus in one night! It will not work, and you will just have a sensory overload, especially if you're doing it for 6-10 subjects.
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tigress22
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(Original post by tvkradi22)
Pleeeeeeeeeeease do not cram the syllabus in one night! It will not work, and you will just have a sensory overload, especially if you're doing it for 6-10 subjects.
I think that depends on the person. I revised beforehand but also crammed the evening (don't cram the night-you need sleep!) and it really helped for facts to stick in my head. Try it out before to see whether it works for you.
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Hazzabear
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Create a structured revision timetable! Add in your extra curricular activities and anything else you usually do within the week. What subjects are you studying?
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riekeleah
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From my GCSE experience:
Tone down the parties around January. I’m not saying don’t go to any, because I certainly did, but you have a long summer to do whatever you kids get up to these days. Do the exams and then you can do whatever you want!
Create a revision timetable but don’t focus too much on it as you will get stressed if you start missing sessions.
Ask. For. Help. If you don’t understand something, ask a teacher or a friend who understands it. Your exams are more important than worrying about bothering teachers. It’s their job to help you get the grades you want, so use them as a resource.
Attend help sessions in subjects you struggle with from as early as possible. The sooner you understand the topics you struggle with, the less stressful revision gets.
Don’t go overboard. Have breaks regularly, use focus apps like Focus Keeper or Flora to keep track of how much you’ve done.
Forget the summer body (it’s a dumb idea anyway). Stress eat if it makes you feel better. Use a packet of Haribos as a reward for finishing a chapter of a subject.
Take time for yourself. Not everything is about revision. If you start revising and end up just sitting there stressing out, go and have a bath or bake something or do a face mask, whatever helps you relax. Don’t ever feel bad for looking after your mental health.
Don’t think too far into the future. Focus on your upcoming GCSEs, not A-Levels or university. You have plenty of time to worry about that later.
Lastly, try to enjoy it. It’s your last year of secondary school and you won’t ever forget it.

Good luck and I hope this helps!
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IAMALLWAYSRIGHT
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Not the best idea to practise past papers this is due to the fact that the new GCSEs content is not the same as the previous GCSEs this means if you go to do a previous GCSE paper it will not help at all in fact it will confuse you furthermore.
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OR321
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You’ll probably hear this a million times but year 11 is honestly the fastest year of your life so make the most of it coz it will help you do the subjects you want to do in college otherwise you’ll be left resitting GCSEs in college which is a big waste of time. So basically just stay focused and make sure you understand everything.
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DallasGilmore
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How can you help me to push up my maths grade...i am working at a 3 but i feel i should be at a 6
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