Quitting a grad job after a week or two- best way to do it?

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bobbricks
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I'll be starting a grad job soon. In the meantime, I am still waiting to hear back from another employer (for a grad job) located elsewhere. This job would be my ideal one and for me, more interesting and exciting than the one I am about to start. The notice period is 2 weeks.

If I am lucky enough to get through, how would I go about quitting the first grad job? Especially since I'll be going through training/induction, and will likely have only worked there for a week or two. Do I just turn up to my boss and tell them I'm quitting, or send an email and not turn up, or something else?
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DuckDodgers
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Talk to them in-person and tell them you received an offer for a better job. You can't not turn up.
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williamho
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So you wants to quit your current job, hoping that he ideal job will be offer to you in the future ?

Is this counting your chicken before the egg hatch ?

how certain are you that the ideal job will be yours ?
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bobbricks
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(Original post by williamho)
So you wants to quit your current job, hoping that he ideal job will be offer to you in the future ?

Is this counting your chicken before the egg hatch ?

how certain are you that the ideal job will be yours ?
Hi, I have not started my first grad job yet but this ideal job said they'll get back to me in the next few weeks - they said it'll take them a few weeks to send out all the offer documents and stuff so it's quite a good chance I got it
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bobbricks
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(Original post by DuckDodgers)
Talk to them in-person and tell them you received an offer for a better job. You can't not turn up.
Would it be better to wait until all the training and induction has finished first, or just do it immediately once I receive the new offer?
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markova21
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I would go to the training/induction and bide your time. Then if and when the ideal job comes through, write a letter to whoever, explaining that you feel this is not going to be the right position for you, and that in thinking about the company's best interests, it is better for them that you leave now, so they can find someone more suitable for the position, as you realise this isn't you. But for goodness sake, wait until the other job is definitely in the bag first. Say nothing till then.
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DuckDodgers
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(Original post by bobbricks)
Would it be better to wait until all the training and induction has finished first, or just do it immediately once I receive the new offer?
It would be best to wait until the day you know you're starting your new job and everything is finalised.

Seriously, you don't owe that new company anything. There's no point in feeling bad about it because they will have burned through a good number of candidates in order to get you. They won't have felt bad about it whatsoever so why feel bad for them?

P.s. It feels like my *****y experiences in the job market have left me with an anarchic tinge.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by bobbricks)
Would it be better to wait until all the training and induction has finished first, or just do it immediately once I receive the new offer?
It would be better to ask the job that is still sorting the paperwork if you have a firm offer or not. Explain that you have a job lined up with a start dates of X, and while you would prefer their job, it does put you in a very awkward position with the first company, if they make an offer two weeks in. If they can make you an offer now, you won't start with the other company.
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DuckDodgers
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^ Yeah do this actually. A bit more professional.
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swelshie
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Also bear in mind you don't have the job until you have signed a contract- a verbal offer is not binding. "Anything can happen" until that point, funding can get pulled, they could match someone else to the role etc.
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Dunya
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Write a letter, fold it into a paper plane and get ready for take off
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by markova21)
I would go to the training/induction and bide your time. Then if and when the ideal job comes through, write a letter to whoever, explaining that you feel this is not going to be the right position for you, and that in thinking about the company's best interests, it is better for them that you leave now, so they can find someone more suitable for the position, as you realise this isn't you. But for goodness sake, wait until the other job is definitely in the bag first. Say nothing till then.
I agree
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