IrrationalNumber
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#41
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Have you checked you can actually do the 3.5 A-levels?
I don't think anyone could walk into S4 S3 S2 after only a weeks work collectively and still get As in them. Even the people getting SS on STEP2/3 probably can't do that.
Definitely possible with S2 and S3 but I think all 3 in a week might be a bit much. Which modules have you done already?
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JoMo1
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#42
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C1-4, M1,2, S1, D1, FP1, NM.

Got marks for C1,2, M1, FP1, S1.

I'm reasonably sure I can get 3.5 on the basis that my maths teacher is encouraging it and he's an MEI chief examiner.

I don't expect to get As in S2-4 after a couple of weeks work, just enough marks to get As overall. Chances are I'll put in a reasonable amount of work and they'll be like any other module, but I like to have a safety net in these situations.
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julija
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#43
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(Original post by SouthernFreerider)
not really. in others units you know when you have the right answer. in D1 you never know if you've written it down properly.
now that's the post which I was waiting for, I hate the questions when you don't know how to write an answer properly.
now which module should I take instead of D1.. :rolleyes:
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musically_minded
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#44
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(Original post by julija)
now that's the post which I was waiting for, I hate the questions when you don't know how to write an answer properly.
now which module should I take instead of D1.. :rolleyes:
I don't see how it is any different from method marks and answers in other modules. There is always a correct answer, and a set way to get there. The method marks have more significance in D1 and D2 than the answer, as you are showing that you can apply an algorithm. I'd say you should have more of an idea of what to write as most of the time you just follow an algorithm and show each stage of working.
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SouthernFreerider
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#45
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(Original post by musically_minded)
I don't see how it is any different from method marks and answers in other modules. There is always a correct answer, and a set way to get there. The method marks have more significance in D1 and D2 than the answer, as you are showing that you can apply an algorithm. I'd say you should have more of an idea of what to write as most of the time you just follow an algorithm and show each stage of working.
its really not. the way of showing how you differentiated for example, is totally different to the way you have to write down the algorithm. you know it is.
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DoMakeSayThink
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#46
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(Original post by julija)
Now I'm confused about D modules as opinions are slightly different :rolleyes:
D1 takes tedium to new extremes. Don't do it if you're more interested in maths than grades.
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DoMakeSayThink
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#47
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(Original post by julija)
now that's the post which I was waiting for, I hate the questions when you don't know how to write an answer properly.
now which module should I take instead of D1.. :rolleyes:
In my D1 exam, there was a pathfinding question about Las Vegas, and the answer spelled CASINO. It was so strange to see something approaching a sense of humor from the exam boards.
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RJA
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#48
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In a D2 exam I had a question about a secret agent who'd escaped from one "Evil Doctor Fiendish" and had to find his way out through a network...;no;
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Dystopia
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#49
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(Original post by IrrationalNumber)
I don't think anyone could walk into S4 S3 S2 after only a weeks work collectively and still get As in them. Even the people getting SS on STEP2/3 probably can't do that.
Why do you say that?

If you are reasonably intelligent and have a sound understanding of the earlier work, it really doesn't take that long to learn an A-Level module.
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musically_minded
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(Original post by SouthernFreerider)
its really not. the way of showing how you differentiated for example, is totally different to the way you have to write down the algorithm. you know it is.
I think you're missing the point. I didn't say anything about writing down the algorithm, I said about applying the algorithm to a given situation. In my entire experience of maths you learn how to do something, then spot where to use it and apply it. It's just with D1 and D2, the algorithms you use tell you specifically what to do. As long as you write enough down so someone can follow it, no problems. You could turn differentiation into an algorithm, all it is is a process. You can skip stages of working for differentiation because it's implied that you can do it when you get the right answer. Much of the time you can work out the answer to a D1 or D2 question by observation, so you must show your use of the algorithm, the method marks have more significance. If you know the algorithms, you know what you have to write down. You just write more stages down than you would for differentiation for example.
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IrrationalNumber
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#51
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(Original post by Dystopia)
Why do you say that?

If you are reasonably intelligent and have a sound understanding of the earlier work, it really doesn't take that long to learn an A-Level module.
To do that, you'd need to do one about every 2 days. Given how the S4 exam I've just done had the question:
'Prove that for small x(x>0) x/(e^x -1) ~ 1, for large x x/(e^x -1) ~0 and that x/(e^x -1)<1 for all x>0', I think it was quite hard.
I think your views on a 'reasonably intelligent' person are a little off. If you asked anyone in my maths class to learn how to find things like moment generating functions, maximum likelihood estimators and do the above question in 2 days... well I think they'd probably fail. Some of them scored 299/300 in AS maths. So they're hardly stupid.
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SouthernFreerider
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#52
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(Original post by musically_minded)
I think you're missing the point. I didn't say anything about writing down the algorithm, I said about applying the algorithm to a given situation. In my entire experience of maths you learn how to do something, then spot where to use it and apply it. It's just with D1 and D2, the algorithms you use tell you specifically what to do. As long as you write enough down so someone can follow it, no problems. You could turn differentiation into an algorithm, all it is is a process. You can skip stages of working for differentiation because it's implied that you can do it when you get the right answer. Much of the time you can work out the answer to a D1 or D2 question by observation, so you must show your use of the algorithm, the method marks have more significance. If you know the algorithms, you know what you have to write down. You just write more stages down than you would for differentiation for example.
the thing is, you may follow the algorithm correctly, but if its not written down in exactly the right way you dont get the points. i only ever lost marks for not writing it down the right way. its not hard to know when to use what. half the time it tells you.
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julija
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#53
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#53
so guys, the last question, D1 or DE??
Pros and cons??
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DavyS
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#54
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(Original post by julija)
so guys, the last question, D1 or DE??
Pros and cons??
D1
Past Paper
+ Gives you a basic understanding of a few totally new areas of mathematics: graph theory and topology.
+ If you have a large brain and can learn a lot, quickly, should be easy marks.
+ Provides a good founding for a lot of Computer Programming.
+ Introduces operational research, which may universities provide modules in for those studying mathematics or economics
- Many find it tedious, rote learning
- Many find it difficult to get full marks, because of the pedantry of the mark scheme.
- The first few chapters, at least in my module, are some of the most patronising of any A-Level (Example - you have to use an algorithm to find whether 'Mrs. Patel' is in a list of six names)


DE
Past Paper
+ A lot more pure mathematics
+ Introduces differential equations, which seems like it should be very useful in economics
+ Complements C4 integration, and Further Pure Differential equations well (I'm not sure if this is relevant to MEI though, sorry)
- Some of the finer concepts of differential equations can be very tricky.
- Involves a lot of integration, which many find the hardest part of a maths A-Level
- Not supported on other boards, so finding resources may be trickier.

..

That is all I can think of for now. At the moment, I would say take a flick through the past papers, and the A-Level textbooks and see which ones you think you'd prefer.

Many say they hate D1, but, just to provide an alternate opinion, I enjoyed it and found it really useful; but I programme a lot of computers so knowing Djikstra's algorithm helped me. I can't imagine it being useful in anything else though; but I found it fun, if some of the topics a little bit repetetive and systematic.
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julija
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#55
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thanks a lot for your help, DavyS
I think I'll stick with DE, however D1 seams quite easy which would benefit more :rolleyes:
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IrrationalNumber
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#56
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Provided your competant with C4, DE is 3 easy methods. D1 feels like 20... and unfortunately it takes far longer to carry out the D1 methods. If I had the choice between the two, I'd pick DE.
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Viper9201
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#57
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D1 and D2 are probably the easiest maths modules I've done (C1-C4, M1, M2, FP1, FP2, S1, S2, D1, D2). BUt from above post it might be dependant on teaching, not sure. Its pretty simple concepts in maths terms, but may require some lateral thinking in some places. S1 is very easy, especially if you have a semi decent graphical calculator, S2 is probably not much more difficult but my teaching was sub standard this year so am having to teach myself.
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