Miss.Naughty
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#81
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#81
(Original post by serious_man18)
can someone explain do we only compare and contrast the attitudes and values between the texts or can we also compare the linguistic and literary features between them? how much 'comparing' should we do. i cant write one whole section in the end about comparing i tend to integrate it throughout. ?
You compare EVERYTHING that is relevant.

So yes attitudes and values, but not only this lagnuage devices, stylistic features etc etc.
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serious_man18
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#82
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(Original post by Miss.Naughty)
Yeah, i have a double lesson on Tuesday, so i'm hoping i will feel more confident after it!
I have a past paper in which a past student did, also have past homeworks i have done. So i will look at these and revise terminology i think.

:|
can you post the past paper if its an exemplar...pleasee?
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serious_man18
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#83
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#83
(Original post by Miss.Naughty)
You compare EVERYTHING that is relevant.

So yes attitudes and values, but not only this lagnuage devices, stylistic features etc etc.
ah i see
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a_237
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#84
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#84
Anyone recommend how long the compare and contrasting of the two texts should be in page length. i realise it's probably just as much as you want to talk about but any suggesstions so i don't spend to little or too long?!
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Miss.Naughty
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#85
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(Original post by serious_man18)
can you post the past paper if its an exemplar...pleasee?
i haven't got a scanner or whatever, so i can't - i'm sorry, however i did post previously the stucture which they did for it.
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motherfunky
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#86
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#86
I would spend about 30 mins reading and annotating.. maybe 15 mins planning.. then 1hr 15 mins writing maybe a bit longer if it takes less time to read and plan.. the length depends how fast you write!
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wifofito
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#87
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I found this in a year-old thread about Genre Studies. It was by fooish*87:

transcripts and broadcasting: prosodics and spoken lang features important (e.g. non fluency features, pace etc.)

poetry/creative descriptions: more metaphorical features (e.g. similes alliteration...)

broadsheet newspapers: well educated aud so complex lang (e.g. sentence length and polysyllabic lexis) very formal register, discursive and persuasive lang

Tabloids/magazines: informal lang, colloquial language simpler grammar, shorter paras(they are trying to communicate on the aud's level)

speeches: persuasive lang, spoken lang features and prosodics (things like alliteration, rhetorical questions, direct address, sets of three, parallel structures are v common)

letters: obviously the format (openings and closings) is very conventional
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serious_man18
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#88
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(Original post by AshJames)
Yeah, remember that the subject is English (duh) you don't need to dumb your analysis down by writing 'this shows the attitudes and values' you can do it much more implicitly which will show a much more sophisticated style. The examiner will know when you've met that requirement through your expression.

As for your query SFG, I wouldn't worry. Focus more on the language used and what effect it gives, rather than making vague comments about there being a semantic field because there's 3 mentions of different fruits or whatever.
what do you mean by 3 mentions of different fruits?
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serious_man18
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#89
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#89
(Original post by Miss.Naughty)
Firstly - CHILL! and positivity for this exam please!
I'm hec of a nervous too, but it's not going to get us anywhere.

Right, today should be considered as last minute revison, so what's everyone doing?
I'm planning to revise conventons for an hour in a bit. Then look at past papers later and see what i've done in class.

I think the exam is in the afternoon tomorow so we have the morning to revise? I'm guessing we are all in the same boat here.
can you help me out with 'conventions' can u post anything plz. im doing this intensive course and we havent done enough to prepare for this exam. are u talking baout the conventions of diaries, journalistic writing, reportage etc? plz i need help
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serious_man18
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#90
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(Original post by motherfunky)
this site is quite useful btw http://www.litnotes.co.uk/textanalysis.htm
that was great thnxs! but i belive you will not have time to write about everything from each text especially with close inspection on the words, sentence structures etc. you're supposed to pick out the most significant things that appeal to you as a reader and alanylse them. pehaps something from the beggining, middle and end of each text....
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Miss.Naughty
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#91
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#91
Hope this helps some people

Tabloid Newspapers
-Colloquial Language
-Idioms
-Informal Journalistic Approach
-Mostly Simple Syntax
-Exaggerated Lexis
-Bias
-Imbedded Narrative
-'Hook In' Headlines
-Implied connotated meanings
-Lexical Fields
-Topic 'Tangent' Shifts
-Semantics/Pragmatics
-Emotive Language
-Adverbials
-Proper Nouns
-Pronouns
-Short Paragraph Structure
-Chronological Order

Broadsheet Papers
-Formal Register
-Factual
-Descriptive [Adjectives,verbs etc]
-Sophisticated lexis
-Complex Syntax
-Polysyllabic lexis
-Quotes from EXPERTS to back up points
-Politically based? left wing? right wing?
-unbiased?
-Pronouns
-Adverbials
etc


Travel Writing
-Imagery {metaphors + similies}
-Social/Cultrual/Historical references
-Personification
-Onomatopoeia
-Descriptive
-Hyperbolic?
-1st person singular
-Lexical fields depending on topic.
-Varied syntax for emphaisis
-Purpose driven
-Anecdotes
-Colloquialisms
-Abstract nouns
-Listing
-Detailed
-Alliteration
-Assonance
-Cliches?
-Humour? (like Bill Bryson?)
-OVERLAPS conventions of diaries/journals.

Diaries
-1st Person Singular
-Colloquial in places
-Asyndetic/Syndetic listing
-Informal approach mostly
-Chronological Order
-Ellipsis
-Contractions
-Purpose Driven
-Deixis
-Proper Nouns
-Adverbials
-Dynamic Verbs
-Phonological effects
-Observative
-note taking form
-Reflective?

Letter Writing
-Varied syntax
-Modifiers
-Descriptive
-Opening/Ending sequence
-Pre determined audience
-Formal approach depending on audience/reader
-Usually in response to something - an event.
-Adverbials
-Colloquialisms and idioms
-Proper nouns, addresing reader.

Autobiographies
-Real sense of character emerging
-1st person singular
-Confidential tone
-Anecdotes
-Quotes
-Chronological order
-Self-reflective
-Nostalgic approach?
-Own internal world
-Varied syntax
-Lexical fields mirror interests
-clear voice
-direct speech

Speeches
-Pattern of 3 (Rhetoric features)
-Anaphora
-Rhetorical questions
-Personal Pronouns 'you'
-1st person possessive 'our
-Litotes
-Pre determined audience
-Inverted syntax - paraphrase.
-Alliteration
-Imagery
-Hyperbloic
-Repetition
-Persuasive features?
-emotive language
-Imagery
-Imperatives
-Modal Aux.
-Bathos
-Chiamus
-Pathos
-Paradox/Oxymorons/Anthesis
-Varied Syntax for empahsis.

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wifofito
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#92
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#92
What is "polysyllabic lexis" and "litotes"? Thanks for these :P
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serious_man18
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#93
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#93
(Original post by Miss.Naughty)
no i wouldnt start comparing in the intro, your intro should just say what your aim is, and you could say what genres that texts are if you want to and when they were written. But don't go into detail thats what your essay is for!
no, what i meant was that yes you identify the historical.time-period differences in the into but u dont go in detail untill your actually analysing it later in the essay. i saw a model answer do that. no i dont have access to it lol
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Triggerishappy
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#94
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#94
OK, here are some conventions:

TRAVEL WRITING
Autobiographical(ish)
1st person
Historical/Geographical detail
To inform/entertain
Opinionated
Anecdotal

BIOGRAPHY
Fact/figures on the subject
3rd person

AUTOBIOGRAPHY
1st person narrative
Chronological
Detailed knowledge
Almost diary-like

DIARY
Chrionological
Dated?
Drataield events, people and places etc.
Reflective, personal
A
UDIENCE: private/public (why?), fictitious?

JOURNAL
Chronological
Written later from notes - i.e. full sentences, use of literary techniques etc.
Public audience
Often includes jargon
Opinions?
Lots of detail
To inform/analyse

LETTER
To inform/entertain/describe etc.
Usually written to one person
Formality?

SPEECH
Planned/prepared
Persuasive
Strongly emotive
Exclamations, hyperbolic, litotes etc.
Use of summary
Patterning
Repetition
Listing (asyndetic/syndetic)
Rhetorical questions
Literary technique very evident (metaphor/simile in particular)
Phonological technique also evident (alliteration, assonance etc.)

REPORTAGE
Either written by eye-witness [PRIMARY INFORMATION]
Or based on eye-witness account [SECONDARY INFORMATION]
Quick, subjective, incomplete - sense of truthfulness
Vivid imagery

Hope that helps!
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Triggerishappy
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#95
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Damn, someone got there first!

Litotes is understatement
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wifofito
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#96
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#96
(Original post by Triggerishappy)
REPORTAGE
Either written by eye-witness [PRIMARY INFORMATION]
Or based on eye-witness account [SECONDARY INFORMATION]
Quick, subjective, incomplete - sense of truthfulness
Vivid imagery

Hope that helps!
I have something to add to that. It was taken from a similar thread from a few years back, don't give me credit!


Reportage

-Chronological order
-Emotive language
-Personal? Bias?
-Rhetorical Questions.
-Imbedded narrative
-Exclamatory sentences
-Hyperbolic lexis
-Imagery (Metaphors and Similies)
-Active Verbs
-1st person singular - attachment
-mentioning of 3rd persson - narrative voice.
-Indirect reported speech
-Complex sentences
-Pronouns - authenticity
-Diectic references 'There' etc
-Mixed registers
-Adverbial
-Semantic Connotations.

Someone needs to take all the bits and pieces and make a nice organised set for us to learn off by heart
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Miss.Naughty
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#97
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#97
(Original post by wifofito)
What is "polysyllabic lexis" and "litotes"? Thanks for these :P

Polysyllabic lexis is the oppostite of monosyllabic lexis (obvious i know) its means two syllables plus in words such as 'The Governers Meeting At Parliment Yesterday' as opposed to 'It was held at the ball' (mono).

Litotes is the opposite of hyperbolic lexis. So instead of being melodramatic in speech it remains real and impressionate.

Hope this helps
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Miss.Naughty
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#98
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#98
(Original post by wifofito)
I have something to add to that. It was taken from a similar thread from a few years back, don't give me credit!


Reportage

-Chronological order
-Emotive language
-Personal? Bias?
-Rhetorical Questions.
-Imbedded narrative
-Exclamatory sentences
-Hyperbolic lexis
-Imagery (Metaphors and Similies)
-Active Verbs
-1st person singular - attachment
-mentioning of 3rd persson - narrative voice.
-Indirect reported speech
-Complex sentences
-Pronouns - authenticity
-Diectic references 'There' etc
-Mixed registers
-Adverbial
-Semantic Connotations.
Acutally, i posted it about an hour ago
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AshJames
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#99
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#99
This is an analysis I scored 44/50 which was an A... I'm typing this all up guys, so I hope it will be of some use!

------------------------

Text A is an auto-biographical diary entry by Scott, a polar expeditionist, exploring the hardships of his journey. Immediately, we become aware of Scott's fateful situation in his bid to reach the South Pole alive. This is exemplified through the condensed elliptical style: 'Blizzard bad as ever' the omission of the pronoun or verb shows his desperate bid to include as much information as possible as he knows his death is imminent. Although Scott realises that death is close, the tone of his journal remains positive, optimistic and very much patriotic. Scott's prophetic sounding words 'we shall mark...' very much shows this. His use of the collective pronoun 'we' and dynamic verb march conveys how Scott and his fellow expeditionists will remain as one, and consequently end their journey as one. They are still very much proud of their epic achievement.

Scott mixes factual information such as 'W.S.W. and S.W' to educate those who will find his journal and use it for scientific purposes in the future, as well as using emotional language as a vehicle to write about the hard conditions of his last few days. Scott writes about the 'continuous gale' he experienced. Note the connotatively strong noun used 'gale' which foregrounds the harsh reality of his journey - it creates a clear, vivid image for the reader. Additionally, it evokes an emotional response from the reader, as it depicts his journey in a very realistic manner, and of course this is even more so apparent, as we know they did not reach their destination.

Throughout the journal, and despite the hard tribulations Scott had to face, he conveys his positive attitude. He is not trying to gain sympathy, nor is he showing any signs of regret. His words 'We shall stick it out to the end' very much sums up how Scott is not giving up without a fight. It shows his determination and positive attitude, despite the juxtaposition of his words and the reality that they are getting 'weaker' and that the 'end cannot be far.' Scott shows how he is somewhat disappointed that he cannot finish his excursion 'It seems a pity' it again evokes an emotional response from the reader. The final lines of the journal: 'For God's sake look after our people' show how above everything else, Scott cares about his friends and family, and so seeks comfort in God to protect them - very much this strong sense of poignancy for the reader.

As you can see, I've really placed an emphasis on the att's and values, which is obviously important with a text like a journal. I have wrote about TEXT A all on its own.



Text B, Charlotte Smith's Sonnet, similarly to Text A is used as a cathartic vehicle to express and reflect upon her turbulent emotions. Like Scott writing about the hardships and tribulations he faced, the narrator in Smith's Sonnet writes about the troubles of not being able to sleep, and consequently feeling lonely and isolated. The sonnet opens with a vivid description of the outside, which as a reader we can draw a direct parallel with the narrator's emotions. We learn of the 'night-flood' which can be linked to the final line of the sonnet where the narrator: 'only wake to weep!' Smith uses an abundance of personification to link the narrator with the outside weather conditions. We learn of the 'restless waves' which links to the problem of the narrator not being able to sleep. The personification of the waves foregrounds the narrators' emotions and makes it much more poignant and personal for the reader. The first person voice allows us to gain an insight into the very troubles the narrator is having to face.

Smith uses a semantic field of loneliness and isolation to further show the emotions of the narrator. Adjectives such as 'desolate' 'untroubled' and 'sullen' all paint a picture of a young girl feeling very much on her own, and in a reclusive world. We learn of the 'corrosive tides' which also can be linked to the narrator. Just like the waves corroding the rock, the mention state of the narrator is breaking down through lack of sleep and loneliness. The different emotions the narrator is going through can be linked to Scott in Text A, who very much expresses his personal emotions throughout: 'I do not think we can hope for any better things now.'

Smith ends her sonnet further describing the young girl's emotional state: 'Alone I wander' this could be interpreted literally, or metaphorically she could be wandering mentally, likewise her emotions could be seen as wandering. Smith changes the syntax starting with the adjective, which essentially acts to foreground the isolated nature of the female character. Smith concludes her sonnet writing about the 'calm untroubled rest' which the narrator desperately wants; however, she learns that his does not exist, as her emotional state is making her wake up with a 'sigh-swoln breast' from crying.

That is Text B done! Again att's and values are weaved throughout the analysis - very important!


Text C is different from both previous texts in that it is a spoken piece. It is a weather broadcast, which has been planned and scripted prior to airing on television. The opening address of the piece is friendly and inviting: 'Good evening to you' the use of the second person pronoun 'you' signifies that the broadcaster is speaking to everyone, but on a personal level and so creating an immediate relation with the viewers at home. The informal register of the broadcaster becomes apparently almost immediately, with the phatic tone: 'I can't promise you dry weather...' features of informal speech such as the contraction 'can't' exemplify how the broadcaster is trying to create a bond with the viewer, using colloquial language that everyone can identify with. From the vague language and expressions shows how the broadcaster is reluctant to make definite assertions, as of course, what is often predicted is often wrong. This can be seen through the adverbs the broadcaster chooses such as in 'slightly drier' - this of course implies doubt. Additionally modal verbs are used to hedge such as in: tomorrow could give us...' to avoid giving definite assertions about the weather. However technical jardan and informative lexis is used to create a somewhat convincing report on the weather: 'low pressure' and 'flood problems' for example.

The creation of an informal relationship with the viewer and broadcaster is apparent throughout. For example, elisions are used such as 'gonna' in 'that's gonna belt across' also note the colloquial expression used 'belt' the verb creates a vivid image for the watcher at home, whilst also creating subtle humour. It may been seen as being usual that features such as elisions are seen in the broadcast; however, it is colloquial language that everyone can comprehend and relate to. Note that there will be several other channels broadcasting the news, so by creating a solid relationship, the watcher will create a liking for a particular channel/broadcaster and so will return another day/later for any updates. Similarly, to text B where personification is used: 'restless waves' the broadcaster personifies frost. The broadcaster uses humour and a slight sense of hyperbole through presupposing that the audience know who Jack Frost is (An English folklore character as well as a famous children's film snowman that comes alive) 'Our old friend frost' Again, note the idea of the collective pronoun used 'our' to very much create unity with the watchers.

The broadcaster concludes the broadcast with very straight-to-the-point direct information about the weather: '...affected by many flood warning' and 'strong winds' to create an element of conviction. The final closure of the broadcaster: 'that's all from me bye for now' presupposes that as an audience, we will watch him again to find out the weather, and so reinforcing the idea of creating a voyeuristic relationship.


Hope this helps! I apologise for any typos - my scanners broken so I had to type it all up. I'm sure everyone is capable of doing the above, it's just a matter of understanding their purposes and the content really. *rests fingers*
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Miss.Naughty
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#100
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#100
(Original post by AshJames)

Hope this helps! *rests fingers*
Thanks for that. No wonder you got an A, it brilliantly written
We did that paper a few weeks back.
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