is maths hard at a level? or is chemistry harder? Watch

moonbeam08
Badges: 0
#61
Report 11 years ago
#61
(Original post by eulerwaswrong)
no way jose

Chemistry isnt logical - there is no pattern to it.

For example in chains and rings - you need to know something like 32 different types of reactions - and catalysts and conditions off by heart - then apply these to questions.

Whereas in maths you need to remember a couple of things - all of which make logical sense - then apply these to the same old questions that come up year after year

I so agree with this!!
0
reply
kapital
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#62
Report 11 years ago
#62
id recommend maths, especially if its on AQA
easy to revise etc etc

i think i only scraped an A at GSCE so dont go by that, i also got told maths was impossible and a lot of people failed... but that came from my mate who was good at languages
(i got an E in spanish AS...)
0
reply
Tombola
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#63
Report 11 years ago
#63
There's a certain element of pattern in chemistry. Only problem is it's so vast that it's difficult to see where the pattern is. We then end up having to revise certain things by heart.
0
reply
Danielle1990
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#64
Report 11 years ago
#64
CHEMISTRY IS MUUUCH HARDER
Maths all the waaaay! :P
0
reply
Lulu*et*Moi
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#65
Report 11 years ago
#65
I did both, and I'd say Chemistry even though I HATED maths. I hated Chem at first too, but I love it now!

Whatever you feel you're best at. Maths requires a lot of practise.
0
reply
silent ninja
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#66
Report 11 years ago
#66
(Original post by eulerwaswrong)
no way jose

Chemistry isnt logical - there is no pattern to it.

For example in chains and rings - you need to know something like 32 different types of reactions - and catalysts and conditions off by heart - then apply these to questions.

Whereas in maths you need to remember a couple of things - all of which make logical sense - then apply these to the same old questions that come up year after year
You don;t have to memorise 32 reactions, there is a pattern. If you write out the reactants, you can usually figure out what's gonna happen based on the behaviour of groups under certain conditions. Yes this does involve bringing a lot of knowledge together, but that's how it should be.
Memorising reactions is the wrong way of approaching this-- learn the theory first, understand what's going on, then try to understand why you use certain reagents and conditions. You'll then be able to apply it to any similar reactions, even if you've never seen them before.
0
reply
ArjunT
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#67
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#67
does it depend more on how much you actually like the subject and how good you are at it? I find maths ok and after i remember a formula i do quite well and i think with a tutor i may be able to do well. Chemistry i have to keep working at it and at times i find it good however i find some stuff hard to understand like indicators and titration
0
reply
moonbeam08
Badges: 0
#68
Report 11 years ago
#68
(Original post by silent ninja)
You don;t have to memorise 32 reactions, there is a pattern. If you write out the reactants, you can usually figure out what's gonna happen based on the behaviour of groups under certain conditions.
Memorising reactions is the wrong way of approaching this-- learn the theory first, understand what's going on, then try to understand why you use certain reagents and conditions.

There are loads of reaction pathways you need to know!! i wouldn't be surprised if it was over 30! I found there was a massive amount to learn in chemistry even compared to biology!
0
reply
eulerwaswrong
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#69
Report 11 years ago
#69
(Original post by silent ninja)
You don;t have to memorise 32 reactions, there is a pattern. If you write out the reactants, you can usually figure out what's gonna happen based on the behaviour of groups under certain conditions. Yes this does involve bringing a lot of knowledge together, but that's how it should be.
Memorising reactions is the wrong way of approaching this-- learn the theory first, understand what's going on, then try to understand why you use certain reagents and conditions. You'll then be able to apply it to any similar reaction, even if you've never seen it before.
im talking types of reactions - not individual reactions.

like for example alcohols - theres like 8 alone for alcohols.

are you trying to tell me there is a pattern between them all
0
reply
moonbeam08
Badges: 0
#70
Report 11 years ago
#70
(Original post by ArjunT)
does it depend more on how much you actually like the subject and how good you are at it? I find maths ok and after i remember a formula i do quite well and i think with a tutor i may be able to do well. Chemistry i have to keep working at it and at times i find it good however i find some stuff hard to understand like indicators and titration
For me i felt picking chemistry was the worst mistake of my life so far...hate to be dramatic about it!I gave up subjects i was good at like History and English etc and picked Chemistry as i needed it! Believe me if i could choose again...i wouldn't choose it. It is important to pick something you enjoy and in terms of chemistry....you really need to be good at it!
0
reply
moonbeam08
Badges: 0
#71
Report 11 years ago
#71
(Original post by eulerwaswrong)
im talking types of reactions - not individual reactions.

like for example alcohols - theres like 8 alone for alcohols.

are you trying to tell me there is a pattern between them all
i agree!!!! reagents,conditions,products = disgusting!!
0
reply
Indecisive.
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#72
Report 11 years ago
#72
Im not sure there is an answer to this question it really comes down to the attitude, ability and preference of the individual!!! Im doing Maths and Chemistry at A2 now and i find them equally challenging yet I'm doing better at Chemistry atm. However I did AS further maths and there is no doubt that that helped my understanding alot.
0
reply
eulerwaswrong
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#73
Report 11 years ago
#73
(Original post by moonbeam08)
i agree!!!! reagents,conditions,products = disgusting!!
yup - theres no pattern or order to it either - chemistry just takes the piss to be honest
0
reply
Hedgehunter
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#74
Report 11 years ago
#74
(Original post by moonbeam08)
For me i felt picking chemistry was the worst mistake of my life so far...hate to be dramatic about it!I gave up subjects i was good at like History and English etc and picked Chemistry as i needed it! Believe me if i could choose again...i wouldn't choose it. It is important to pick something you enjoy and in terms of chemistry....you really need to be good at it!
I'm sure motivation and enjoyment would be enough?...just learn all the stuff I mean, thats all there is to it.
0
reply
silent ninja
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#75
Report 11 years ago
#75
(Original post by eulerwaswrong)
im talking types of reactions - not individual reactions.

like for example alcohols - theres like 8 alone for alcohols.

are you trying to tell me there is a pattern between them all
There is an element of learning facts, that's just how it is with sciences, but you are implying that you have to sit there memorising reactions. The whole idea of organic chem is to study the behaviour of groups. If you approach it that way, it's much easier.
0
reply
Oxy
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#76
Report 11 years ago
#76
(Original post by jseldis)
Maths is harder at A2.
Chemistry is a huge jump from GCSE to AS, but the gap between AS and A2 is no-where near as bad.

The gap for maths is HUGE, for both. It's very difficult, i'd say.

Maybe try both for AS? Then drop the one you're **** at?
No Maths is not a huge jump....from GCSE to AS its basically the same thing u get taught at Higher GCSE Level maths e.g. cosine rule etc and its not hard at all with the exception of integration and differentiation and radians and a few other bits. i would deffinetly say chemistry is much harder....maths can be self taught and it only takes practice.

Chemistry at GCSE compared to A-level is a whole new kettle of fish, the jump from GCSE to AS is huge just as from AS it A2 is comparable

I got B's in Maths GCSE and Double Science Im now getting an A for AS chemistry and A for AS Maths, i did do some work at home to get my theory up. Chemistry was the hardest but because its my favourite subject i have no trouble learning extra bits n pieces....If u dont have enthusiasm for Chemistry then i wouldnt take it...maths just takes practice questions which is what i did and found the AS exams easy. But if you are prepared to work for both then there no is no reason why u shouldnt take both of them. But its hard work
0
reply
moonbeam08
Badges: 0
#77
Report 11 years ago
#77
It's really not!!! if you want a decent grade in your A-levels and you aint good at chemistry then i would strongly advise you not to pick it! Yes i know i am speaking for myself personallt but i wouldn't pick it unless i needed it or it was my best subject!
0
reply
54321
Badges: 0
#78
Report 11 years ago
#78
If you're getting Bs in them at GCSE, prepare to fail in whichever one you takle.
jerk off is wrong u can easily get A's if ur willing 2 work hard
espically maths its about doing questions
0
reply
moonbeam08
Badges: 0
#79
Report 11 years ago
#79
I can kinda see sense in what he is saying though about getting B's at the minute..........i got an A in chemistry at GCSE and i struggled alot throughout my 2years of doing it for A-level....and i did work hard in them 2years!
0
reply
eulerwaswrong
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#80
Report 11 years ago
#80
(Original post by silent ninja)
There is an element of learning facts, that's just how it is with sciences, but you are implying that you have to sit there memorising reactions. The whole idea of organic chem is to study the behaviour of groups. If you approach it that way, it's much easier.
yes of course - but my point is maths is easier - by far.

For **** sake - id did C4 in 6 days - probably got a mid A in it - perhaps slightly less. Chemistry i will be chuffed with anything above a C this year.

I spend all my time revising for Chem - hardly any for maths and further maths - yet i still end up with much higher marks in maths.

There is far more to learn and understand in chemistry - also it is far harder to get very very high marks due to the nature of the questions
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • The University of Law
    The Bar Series: Applications and Interviews - London Bloomsbury campus Postgraduate
    Thu, 17 Oct '19
  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19
  • Coventry University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 19 Oct '19

Why wouldn't you turn to teachers if you were being bullied?

They might tell my parents (10)
6.71%
They might tell the bully (16)
10.74%
I don't think they'd understand (27)
18.12%
It might lead to more bullying (55)
36.91%
There's nothing they could do (41)
27.52%

Watched Threads

View All