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RedDragon
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#1
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What does Habeas Corpus mean in Latin and what is the legal definition of it?

What does Leonidas mean in Greek?

What's the difference between Monkshood and Wolfsbane?

What is Hansard?

Answer all four without looking it up in books or the internet.
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73337
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no
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The Black Chuck Norris
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what avo said.
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RedDragon
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There must be someone who can answer them.
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Teofilo
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Habeas corpus is the rule that anyone arrested has to be presented and approved by a judge to hold them (with a reason).

I think the def is you have the body or something.
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Dragonfly07
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Habeas corpus

'Habeas corpus' (IPA: /ˈheɪbiəs ˈkɔɹpəs/) (Latin: [We command] that you have the body)[1] is the name of a legal action, or writ, through which a person can seek relief from unlawful detention of themselves or another person. The writ of habeas corpus has historically been an important instrument for the safeguarding of individual freedom against arbitrary state action.

Also known as "The Great Writ," a writ of habeas corpus ad subjiciendum is a summons with the force of a court order addressed to the custodian (such as a prison official) demanding that a prisoner be brought before the court, together with proof of authority, allowing the court to determine whether that custodian has lawful authority to hold that person, or, if not, the person should be released from custody. The prisoner, or another person on their behalf (for example, where the prisoner is being held incommunicado), may petition the court or an individual judge for a writ of habeas corpus.

The right to petition for a writ of habeas corpus has long been celebrated as the most efficient safeguard of the liberty of the subject. Albert Venn Dicey wrote that the Habeas Corpus Acts "declare no principle and define no rights, but they are for practical purposes worth a hundred constitutional articles guaranteeing individual liberty." In most countries, however, the procedure of habeas corpus can be suspended in time of national emergency. In most civil law jurisdictions, comparable provisions exist, but they may not be called "habeas corpus."[2] The reach of habeas corpus is currently being tested in the United States. Oral arguments on a consolidated Guantanamo Bay detention camp detainee habeas corpus petition, Al Odah v. United States were heard by the Supreme Court of the United States on December 5, 2007, and recently by HR 1955 The Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act of 2006. On June 12, 2008, the Supreme Court ruling in Boumediene v. Bush recognized habeas corpus rights for the Guantanamo prisoners.



Leonidas

Leonidas (Greek: Λεωνίδας; "Lion's son", "Lion-like") was a king of Sparta, the 17th of the Agiad line, one of the sons of King Anaxandridas II of Sparta, who was believed to be a descendant of Heracles, possessing much of the strength and bravery that made his ancestor famous. While it has been established that King Leonidas of Sparta died at the Battle of Thermopylae in August, 480 B.C., very little is known about the year of his birth, or for that matter, his formative years. Paul Cartledge, the distinguished scholar and historian who has written countless volumes relative to the Spartans, has narrowed the date of the birth of King Leonidas to around 540 B.C. Therefore, if it is assumed that Leonidas was born anywhere in the years subsequent to 540 B.C., this would have placed him in the 50+ year old range. Leonidas was one of three: he had an older brother Dorieus and a younger brother Cleombrotus, who ruled as regent for a while on Leonidas' death before the regency was taken over by Pausanias, who was Cleombrotus' son. Leonidas succeeded his half-brother Cleomenes I, probably in 489 or 488 BC, and was married to Cleomenes' daughter, Gorgo. His name was raised to heroic status as a result of the events in the Battle of Thermopylae


the difference between Monkshood and Wolfsbane:

Monkshood and Wolfsbane, they are the same plant which also goes by the name of Aconite.


Hansard

Hansard - House of Lords Debates




This has all come from my brain. I did not look a single thing up.
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Airel
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ITT we google the questions and write them as if we knew them.
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RedDragon
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I'd figured, what did I say at the bottom of the post, no internet and no books I was hoping to test people's knowledge. I was hoping to set up a select society, you'd ruin my plans!!! :mad:

Yeeees Dragonfly I believe you :ninja:, Hansard is also the House of Commons Debates,not just House of Lords.
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Sandhu
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I knew what Wolfsbane was, that was it
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RedDragon
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#10
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(Original post by Sandhu)
I knew what Wolfsbane was, that was it
Yes I was hoping Harry Potter fans at least, would know what it was. Thanks to good old Snape.
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Sandhu
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Roffle, I remember that
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