A-level computer science coursework Watch

jasonGreen147
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I have just started Y13 and am currently doing the OCR A-level computer science coursework, I’m just wondering if I and another student are allowed to work on certain parts of our code together as we have some of the same functions?

And if we can will I be penalised for making a “web app” if I’m only using python tkinter and notepad so it would only work in theory ?
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Gyalist
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Yeah u can
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jasonGreen147
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Appreciate it, thanks
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Gyalist
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Just don’t make it look the same visually
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winterscoming
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(Original post by jasonGreen147)
I have just started Y13 and am currently doing the OCR A-level computer science coursework, I’m just wondering if I and another student are allowed to work on certain parts of our code together as we have some of the same functions?

And if we can will I be penalised for making a “web app” if I’m only using python tkinter and notepad so it would only work in theory ?


If you're going to work with someone else on the same code, then it could help to both install git and create a private repository on GitHub. You can push/pull changes to the same bits of code, track its change history, create "branch" copies of the source code files, (and then later 're-merge' those branch copies too.. careful of conflicts though). https://guides.github.com/activities/hello-world/

Git is the most popular tool used for a lot of real projects (free, open-source projects and for-profit/commercial projects) where multiple people are all working and changing the same code; it's got some nice features for helping multiple people add changes to the same code, and much less hassle than trying to email or copy files around, take backups, etc.


On Notepad: It sounds like you're giving yourself an unnecessary headache and could slow yourself down a lot by trying to do everything in a plain-text editor like Notepad; you're missing out on all the useful features of a proper IDE which will assist you in writing the code and finding errors (especially a language like Python which is hyper-sensitive to spaces and indentation). It's totally doable of course, just a really slow, inefficient (and probably frustrating) way to write code; like having a hand tied behind your back. .

I'd recommend using JetBrains PyCharm (Community Edition is completely free) instead. Aside from autoformatting, syntax highlighting, autocomplete, error-highlighting, mouse-over popup help, etc, One of the most important features that you'll get with PyCharm is the debugger with "breakpoints" (red dots), which could save you hours/days in troubleshooting your program when things aren't working the way you expect. (You can pause and step through the code of a 'live' program while it's running; watch the step-by-step flow of the program, inspect variables and watch their values change, etc.)
https://www.jetbrains.com/help/pycha...plication.html
https://www.jetbrains.com/help/pycha...thon-code.html


Also, you mentioned TKInter for web apps -- did you mean a GUI/Desktop app? (TKinter doesn't have any functions or classes which can be used for a web app, so I can't think how that'd work, maybe I'm missing something).

If you did mean a web app (i.e. an app which can run on a web server, and serve html/web-content to a web browser), then it could be worth spending a couple of days taking a look at Flask - this has loads of useful functions and classes for web apps (it takes care of a lot of boring/messy/fiddly HTTP and HTML stuff for you): https://blog.miguelgrinberg.com/post...-i-hello-world

People tend to use all kinds of libraries and other tools for the A-Level coursework. Most important thing is that enough of the code you write is yours, and is sufficiently complex . For example, an "OO" structure/patterns, algorithms, data structures, complex database/SQL code, networking code, encryption, data processing, error handling/checking, and just having enough significant hand-written code and features/functionality in the app you write to be advanced enough for the A-Level project; there are tonnes of ways you can achieve that with a web app - e.g. adding a user auth login, user profiles, generated tables/graphs, file upload, send emails, etc.
Last edited by winterscoming; 3 days ago
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jasonGreen147
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Thanks this helped alot 😁
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