Nengim
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I need help your advice. Which of the university and course do you think or know leads to a path as process engineer. The deep of teaching should be considered too.


1. University of Aberdeen (Advanced chemical engineering)
2. University of Cranfield (Process system engineering)
3. University of Surrey (Process system engineering)

Stating your reason for choice will be highly appreciated.
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Newcastle University Student Ambassador
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(Original post by Nengim)
I need help your advice. Which of the university and course do you think or know leads to a path as process engineer. The deep of teaching should be considered too.


1. University of Aberdeen (Advanced chemical engineering)
2. University of Cranfield (Process system engineering)
3. University of Surrey (Process system engineering)

Stating your reason for choice will be highly appreciated.
Hi Nengim, have you thought about Newcastle University? There are three courses that I think would best suit you:

1. Chemical Engineering with Process Control - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails
2. Chemical Engineering with Bioprocess Engineering - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails
3. BEng/MEng (Honours): Chemical Engineering - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails

I have included the link for each degree so that you can check out the modules that are taught.

I have just graduated from Newcastle University with a BEng in Civil Engineering and I can say that the content covered in lectures in very in depth, particularly in Year 3 (and Year 4 if you do an MEng), there is also a lot of practical work and lab work to supplement the theory learnt in lectures. With regard to your career prospect, as a Newcastle University alumni you will have access to a package of benefits and services, designed to help you make the most of life after University - whether you are seeking a graduate career, going on to further study or starting your own business, the careers service at the university offers a range of support to help you realise your potential.

If you have any more questions you can contact the School of Engineering at [email protected]

I hope this helps
- Jasmine
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Student-95
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(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi Nengim, have you thought about Newcastle University? There are three courses that I think would best suit you:

1. Chemical Engineering with Process Control - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails
2. Chemical Engineering with Bioprocess Engineering - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails
3. BEng/MEng (Honours): Chemical Engineering - https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails

I have included the link for each degree so that you can check out the modules that are taught.

I have just graduated from Newcastle University with a BEng in Civil Engineering and I can say that the content covered in lectures in very in depth, particularly in Year 3 (and Year 4 if you do an MEng), there is also a lot of practical work and lab work to supplement the theory learnt in lectures. With regard to your career prospect, as a Newcastle University alumni you will have access to a package of benefits and services, designed to help you make the most of life after University - whether you are seeking a graduate career, going on to further study or starting your own business, the careers service at the university offers a range of support to help you realise your potential.

If you have any more questions you can contact the School of Engineering at [email protected]

I hope this helps
- Jasmine
Considering they're asking about post grad courses, none of your links are suitable.
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University of Aberdeen
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(Original post by Nengim)
I need help your advice. Which of the university and course do you think or know leads to a path as process engineer. The deep of teaching should be considered too.


1. University of Aberdeen (Advanced chemical engineering)
2. University of Cranfield (Process system engineering)
3. University of Surrey (Process system engineering)

Stating your reason for choice will be highly appreciated.
Hello Nengim,

I noticed your thread. How are you today? If you want to work as a process engineer, I would consider which sector you want to work in. If you want options when you graduate look for the course modules within the programmes which offer you the most depth, breadth and potential to work in different industries. I have had a look at the Advanced Chemical Engineering programme you mention above. It looks like it gives you the flexibility to work across different industries, and some of these industries will need very good process engineers in the future, to clean up whilst we make and create in our future industries. Though Aberdeen is well known for its oil and gas industry, a lot of process design and chemical engineering knowledge from that industry has been applied to many other sectors due to the safety critical nature of operations and in depth learning.

Apart from looking at the course modules you might want to look at the Institute of Chemical Engineers website for information and there are innovation centres in both Scotland and England which you may also be interested in looking at. Academics work with these innovation centres to provide some really exciting research and development work for a range of industries, resulting in licensing, spin out companies, new products and new industries. It all looks very exciting! Good luck with your decision and I am sure you will do very well!
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Nengim
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(Original post by University of Aberdeen)
Hello Nengim,

I noticed your thread. How are you today? If you want to work as a process engineer, I would consider which sector you want to work in. If you want options when you graduate look for the course modules within the programmes which offer you the most depth, breadth and potential to work in different industries. I have had a look at the Advanced Chemical Engineering programme you mention above. It looks like it gives you the flexibility to work across different industries, and some of these industries will need very good process engineers in the future, to clean up whilst we make and create in our future industries. Though Aberdeen is well known for its oil and gas industry, a lot of process design and chemical engineering knowledge from that industry has been applied to many other sectors due to the safety critical nature of operations and in depth learning.

Apart from looking at the course modules you might want to look at the Institute of Chemical Engineers website for information and there are innovation centres in both Scotland and England which you may also be interested in looking at. Academics work with these innovation centres to provide some really exciting research and development work for a range of industries, resulting in licensing, spin out companies, new products and new industries. It all looks very exciting! Good luck with your decision and I am sure you will do very well!
Thank you for your genuine concern about my welfare. Thank you for your carefully thought answer..
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Cranfield University
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Hi, @Nengim

Good day, I’m a Cranfield Uni student room rep. Congrats on the offer!, Not to be biased, I feel Cranfield has a lot to offer. Not quoting the fact that the Unis mentioned above are great!. As I'm an alumnus on one of the Unis, I suggest that the only edge Cranfield has in this field is the strong ties with industries for two decades!, as Cranfield is a Postgraduate-Industry based university. Just to mentioned a few companies associated with are Alstom Power, BP, Chevron, Conoco Philips, Emerson Process Management, npower, RWE, Shell, Siemens, Total. And of course, this implies Cranfield industrial-scale research facilities and pilot-scale demonstration programmes in the process systems engineering area.
Graduates on completing this course have been directly employed in Companies including:Aramco (Saudi Arabia), Bayer Crop Science, British Petroleum (BP), National Iranian Oil Company, Petroleum Research Institute, Libya, Ecopetrol, Columbia, Emerson Process Management, Ford Motor Company, Hidrostal, China Petroleum Engineering & Construction Corporation, Switzerland, GlaxoSmithKline, Doosan Babcock, Oceaneering, Opal Telecom, Origami Energy, Petrofac Engineering, DIT Ireland, Thistle Seafoods, Sanofi-Synthelabo, Saipem, Process Systems Enterprise, M W Kellog, Solutia Ltd, Saipem, Process Systems Enterprise, ABB, China Petroleum Engineering & Construction Corporation, Ford Motor Company, GlaxoSmithKline, Thistle Seafoods, Origami Energy, etc.

I hope this helps, for more questions please don’t hesitate to ask; all the best in your next steps.
For more on this course, see here; https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/...ms-engineering
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Nengim
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Thank you
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Cranfield University
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Your always welcome.
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Nengim
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(Original post by Cranfield University)
Hi, @Nengim

Good day, I’m a Cranfield Uni student room rep. Congrats on the offer!, Not to be biased, I feel Cranfield has a lot to offer. Not quoting the fact that the Unis mentioned above are great!. As I'm an alumnus on one of the Unis, I suggest that the only edge Cranfield has in this field is the strong ties with industries for two decades!, as Cranfield is a Postgraduate-Industry based university. Just to mentioned a few companies associated with are Alstom Power, BP, Chevron, Conoco Philips, Emerson Process Management, npower, RWE, Shell, Siemens, Total. And of course, this implies Cranfield industrial-scale research facilities and pilot-scale demonstration programmes in the process systems engineering area.
Graduates on completing this course have been directly employed in Companies including:Aramco (Saudi Arabia), Bayer Crop Science, British Petroleum (BP), National Iranian Oil Company, Petroleum Research Institute, Libya, Ecopetrol, Columbia, Emerson Process Management, Ford Motor Company, Hidrostal, China Petroleum Engineering & Construction Corporation, Switzerland, GlaxoSmithKline, Doosan Babcock, Oceaneering, Opal Telecom, Origami Energy, Petrofac Engineering, DIT Ireland, Thistle Seafoods, Sanofi-Synthelabo, Saipem, Process Systems Enterprise, M W Kellog, Solutia Ltd, Saipem, Process Systems Enterprise, ABB, China Petroleum Engineering & Construction Corporation, Ford Motor Company, GlaxoSmithKline, Thistle Seafoods, Origami Energy, etc.

I hope this helps, for more questions please don’t hesitate to ask; all the best in your next steps.
For more on this course, see here; https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/...ms-engineering
Can a graduate of this program work as a process engineer?
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Cranfield University
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Yes sure, you can work as a process engineer or any related field engineer.
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