giggler
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#1
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Does anyone know any proper UK universities that offer something a MD degree which allow clinical and residency in the states .

The UK's bachelor in medicine and surgery means I would have to do transition years in the states so I really need a MD any ideas?
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TheOneWho
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Why not try to do one in the States if that is where you are wanting to work?
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giggler
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(Original post by TheOneWho)
Why not try to do one in the States if that is where you are wanting to work?
$40,00 per year X 5 years = $200,000
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Skipper
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As far as I know...in the UK an "MD" is a postgraduate research qualification. You'll have to do the MBBS here and then do the conversion course in USA. Look on the bright side though, cheaper and arguably easier to get a place at med school here.
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TheOneWho
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Do a medicine degree in the UK and work here, then? You could probably move to the States later in life if you really wanted to.
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pvpchina
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very true. Its better to get a degree in europe considering that you will ace the american test afterwards.
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giggler
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(Original post by Skipper)
As far as I know...in the UK an "MD" is a postgraduate research qualification. You'll have to do the MBBS here and then do the conversion course in USA. Look on the bright side though, cheaper and arguably easier to get a place at med school here.
Well I found http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/ug-prospe...ing-to-md.html but apparently the unis crap. There also http://northumbria.ac.uk/?view=Cours...l&code=DUFBMS4
But apparently its still in testing phase.

I am sure there some out there.
(Original post by TheOneWho)
Do a medicine degree in the UK and work here, then? You could probably move to the States later in life if you really wanted to.
The UK its mainly 9am-5pm (if that!) over 10 - 15 yrs to qualify as a specialist. In the states its typically 04:50 - 20:00 over 3 - 7 years depending on you residency (specialty choice). So as you can see across the pond is much more intense, this scares away some but I'm attracted to the challenge.

How will it make you a better doctor? Well the intense workload, means you will acquire more knowledge and skills in a shorter period than you would in the UK system. Meaning you will have no choice but too learn faster and concentrate more (adaption), as you will be treating patients. You will be an attending in the US before you would be a consultant here, but with more experience and arguably more confidence.

Secondly the British government's reshuffle of the NHS means there is no guarantee of doctors becoming consultants due to "bottle-necks" Meaning most UK doctors are stuck at staff grade level.
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TheOneWho
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Then you have to make a decision, compromise. Take the longer, but cheaper route of the UK or go to America and pay thousands but get to where you want to quicker.
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Skipper
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(Original post by giggler)
The UK its mainly 9am-5pm (if that!)
I'm afraid it's not.
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giggler
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(Original post by Skipper)
I'm afraid it's not.
Really? My friends a F1 doctor at St. Georges hospital and he tells me that thats what his average days like - not inc call. Sometimes a bit over sometimes a but under!

BTW you sig is cruel.
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giggler
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(Original post by TheOneWho)
Then you have to make a decision, compromise. Take the longer, but cheaper route of the UK or go to America and pay thousands but get to where you want to quicker.
So there no alternative that you know of is what your saying? I just think with adaquete research there's an option.

Does you know anythink about offshore american med schools like
http://www.rossu.edu/medical-school/
http://www.aucmed.edu/
? If so I would love to hear any experiences you know, first or second hand.

Also its not just to get where I want to quicker, lets face it the US are advanced beyond belief especially when it comes to medical technology.
(e.g the average UK hospital has one MRI, when I went to Atlanta, Georgia the average Admissions ward in a hospital had two MRI's) I am really sure an American residency will be REAL learning experience and make me better at whatever I decide to specialize in.
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Skipper
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(Original post by giggler)
Really? My friends a F1 doctor at St. Georges hospital and he tells me that thats what his average days like - not inc call. Sometimes a bit over sometimes a but under!

BTW you sig is cruel.
I'm guessing with "on call" he's probabaly a lot busier. Maybe I'm totally wide of the mark but on my work experience the GP I was with was working atleast 8-6 Monday to Friday in his surgery plus 2/3 hours of paperwork when he got home. He then also did 2 nights of Cuedoc (Emergency GP service) every fortnight from 7pm to 2 or 3am I think. Pretty heavy workload and he was a senior partner. Depends on what specialty you go into.
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TheOneWho
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Not studying medicine I don't know much about it, but common sense tells me that medicine being the degree that it is won't come cheap anywhere. So you are going to have to decide if you can afford to pay tens of thousands in tuition fees, and if you can you might as well go to the States if you can get in, or you can go to a university in the UK and it'll be cheaper but will take you a few more years.
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x_emme_x
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Have you tried St.George's University in somewhere nice and fair away (can't remember where about's sorry) as they say you can practise in the states and the UK but at a cost of about $16000 a year!
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giggler
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(Original post by Skipper)
I'm guessing with "on call" he's probabaly a lot busier. Maybe I'm totally wide of the mark but on my work experience the GP I was with was working at least 8-6 Monday to Friday in his surgery plus 2/3 hours of paperwork when he got home. He then also did 2 nights of Cuedoc (Emergency GP service) every fortnight from 7pm to 2 or 3am I think. Pretty heavy workload and he was a senior partner. Depends on what specialty you go into.
Most probably , however call at St Georges is every 4 days. I don't think GP's workload is that high but I cant say. But do you not think it would be better for a prospective doctor to go to the US. Where on 80hr weeks are the norm. Surgical residency's have been known to exceed the 100hr mark (rarely though). More experience and greater technology - which in this profession can save many lives.
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giggler
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(Original post by x_emme_x)
Have you tried St.George's University in somewhere nice and fair away (can't remember where about's sorry) as they say you can practise in the states and the UK but at a cost of about $16000 a year!
Yh I seen St Georges (in Grenada), Ross, AUC and SABA all four of shore US medical schools do rotations in the states and are REALLY affordable for me. Also all 4 are licensed in all 50 US states.

what do you know about st georges? have you or anyone you know applied? If so what was it like? this questions are open to all.
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Skipper
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(Original post by giggler)
Most probably , however call at St Georges is every 4 days. I don't think GP's workload is that high but I cant say. But do you not think it would be better for a prospective doctor to go to the US. Where on 80hr weeks are the norm. Surgical residency's have been known to exceed the 100hr mark (rarely though). More experience and greater technology - which in this profession can save many lives.
It purely depends on your otlook of life. I wouldn't say that the training and practice here was substandard in comparison to the US. Cynics would say the only reason to go to the US would be for the money.
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giggler
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(Original post by Skipper)
It purely depends on your otlook of life. I wouldn't say that the training and practice here was substandard in comparison to the US. Cynics would say the only reason to go to the US would be for the money.
I wouldnt say medical training is sub standard here compared to the US. Its just Different. However say two med students graduated and did 5 yrs training, one in the US and the other in the UK. The US doctor could work in the US or UK as an attending or consultant with great experience and would overly qualified. The UK doctor would be an adequate staff grade doctor in the UK and would not survive in the US, so yes it does depend in you outlook and what you want out of life.

"Cynics" that say that are either ignorant of the above facts or anti American probably ignorant. The states has some of the best medical technologies and facilities available. A doctor should want to make a difference, I can think of no place a doctor can make a bigger difference than the states. In clinical trials , research etc. That is not to say someone cant make a difference elsewhere. - just my two pence worth
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TheOneWho
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Surely someone can make more of a difference being a doctor in some sub-Saharan African country than in the States?
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giggler
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(Original post by TheOneWho)
Surely someone can make more of a difference being a doctor in some sub-Saharan African country than in the States?
Its relative, they might be able to save some African ppl, but in the states global disease can be researched and cured. For example HIV treatment originated in the US and can be used in every continent.

Also treating patients requires money.
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