TheOneWho
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#21
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#21
Sadly they can't afford it...

Anyway, for that kind of research I wouldn't have thought a medicine degree is what would be needed. A degree in medicinal chemistry or biochemistry or something like that would probably be better.
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suek
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#22
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#22
You can still get that 'challenge' you want in the States. You don't have to do the degree there. Do the 5 years of med school in the UK, then do the conversion course and move over there?

That's got to be the cheapest way for you to do it.

Besides, any study you do in the UK clinically will be based on UK hospitals (obviously!), and the UK system, UK hours and all (The Northumbria/St George's partnership still has a lot in the UK). The only way you'll truly get the American experience from Day 1 is to study over there from day 1 which financially is obviously a concern, so you'll just have to settle I think
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giggler
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#23
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#23
(Original post by TheOneWho)
Sadly they can't afford it...

Anyway, for that kind of research I wouldn't have thought a medicine degree is what would be needed. A degree in medicinal chemistry or biochemistry or something like that would probably be better.
I was just generalizing the advantage medical education has in the states. My cousin has a MD and is a pathologist. He tells me that hes involved with advanced virus modification. For instance treating a cancer patient and targeting the cancer with a virus. While on his rounds as a 4th year resident.

(Original post by suek)
You can still get that 'challenge' you want in the States. You don't have to do the degree there. Do the 5 years of med school in the UK, then do the conversion course and move over there?

That's got to be the cheapest way for you to do it.

Besides, any study you do in the UK clinically will be based on UK hospitals (obviously!), and the UK system, UK hours and all (The Northumbria/St George's partnership still has a lot in the UK). The only way you'll truly get the American experience from Day 1 is to study over there from day 1 which financially is obviously a concern, so you'll just have to settle I think
Thats what it looks like. But I suppose it was worth a try thanks all.
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Renal
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#24
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#24
(Original post by giggler)
Also its not just to get where I want to quicker, lets face it the US are advanced beyond belief especially when it comes to medical technology.
(e.g the average UK hospital has one MRI, when I went to Atlanta, Georgia the average Admissions ward in a hospital had two MRI's) I am really sure an American residency will be REAL learning experience and make me better at whatever I decide to specialize in.
Having lots of MRI machines doesn't make better doctors, it makes doctors better at ordering tests in lieu of diagnosis.
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Renal
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#25
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#25
(Original post by giggler)
Most probably , however call at St Georges is every 4 days. I don't think GP's workload is that high but I cant say. But do you not think it would be better for a prospective doctor to go to the US. Where on 80hr weeks are the norm. Surgical residency's have been known to exceed the 100hr mark (rarely though). More experience and greater technology - which in this profession can save many lives.
Depends on the speciality and the banding. Many of my colleagues work 70hr weeks, some 48hr.

More experience in the US and greater reliance on technology? Source?
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Renal
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#26
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(Original post by TheOneWho)
Not studying medicine I don't know much about it, but common sense tells me that medicine being the degree that it is won't come cheap anywhere. So you are going to have to decide if you can afford to pay tens of thousands in tuition fees, and if you can you might as well go to the States if you can get in, or you can go to a university in the UK and it'll be cheaper but will take you a few more years.
Doing it in the UK will be a hundred times cheaper and take less time.
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Renal
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#27
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#27
(Original post by giggler)
The US doctor could work in the US or UK as an attending or consultant with great experience and would overly qualified.
Being trained outside the EU they wouldn't find it easy...
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Renal
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Skipper)
As far as I know...in the UK an "MD" is a postgraduate research qualification. You'll have to do the MBBS here and then do the conversion course in USA. Look on the bright side though, cheaper and arguably easier to get a place at med school here.
What is this conversion course, AIUI, all you need is to the USMLE which you can do at medical school and in your first couple of years as a junior. With that you can then apply for American jobs.

I'd be really interested to know why the OP is such an idiot.
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The Mute
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#29
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#29
Already been trying to work this out...

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=605895
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lemily
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#30
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#30
Also to do an MD course in the states you already need first degree where you have specialised in chemistry as a major or other related field. I know if you apply as a foreign student to most US med schools, they only take about 1-3 students a year as they are so competitive and I think you have to have a first degree from a UK uni - A-levels aren't going to cut it I don't think. So you can do a 5 year med in the UK plus a conversion course then go to the States, or do a 3 year BSc in the UK, apply for the US med school, complete that in loads of debt and have wasted roughly the same amount of time. an MD is generally a post-grad qualification. Do you already have a degree? I also thoroughly agree with Renal in that having more MRI machines and technology does not make you a better doctor at all.
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Renal
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#31
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#31
There is no conversion course, it's just an exam.
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Egypt
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#32
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#32
(Original post by giggler)
So there no alternative that you know of is what your saying? I just think with adaquete research there's an option.

Does you know anythink about offshore american med schools like
http://www.rossu.edu/medical-school/
http://www.aucmed.edu/
? If so I would love to hear any experiences you know, first or second hand.


Also its not just to get where I want to quicker, lets face it the US are advanced beyond belief especially when it comes to medical technology.
(e.g the average UK hospital has one MRI, when I went to Atlanta, Georgia the average Admissions ward in a hospital had two MRI's) I am really sure an American residency will be REAL learning experience and make me better at whatever I decide to specialize in.
The only people I have come accross who have studied here did because they couldn't get in to med schools anywhere else but had loads of money. My experience of them clinically wwas that they were not as good as UK med undergrads as they chose what modules they did. For example, no obs+gynae because they didn't really like it, but a 3 month psych rotation! Sounds like a really great doctor!
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Egypt
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#33
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#33
(Original post by giggler)
So there no alternative that you know of is what your saying? I just think with adaquete research there's an option.

Does you know anythink about offshore american med schools like
http://www.rossu.edu/medical-school/
http://www.aucmed.edu/
? If so I would love to hear any experiences you know, first or second hand.

Also its not just to get where I want to quicker, lets face it the US are advanced beyond belief especially when it comes to medical technology.
(e.g the average UK hospital has one MRI, when I went to Atlanta, Georgia the average Admissions ward in a hospital had two MRI's) I am really sure an American residency will be REAL learning experience and make me better at whatever I decide to specialize in.


Have you considered the fact that everyone gets scanned because the punters pay for it, not because its clinically necessary?!
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Renal
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Egypt)
[/B]

Have you considered the fact that everyone gets scanned because the punters pay for it, not because its clinically necessary?!
When I was in A&E with a gobby punter demanding an x-ray I'd be really tempted to get them an extra bit of irradiation, kind of like carcinogenic spit in your food at a restaurant.
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Egypt
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#35
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#35
(Original post by Renal)
When I was in A&E with a gobby punter demanding an x-ray I'd be really tempted to get them an extra bit of irradiation, kind of like carcinogenic spit in your food at a restaurant.
:sly: Full body CT sir? of course......
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giggler
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Renal)
Having lots of MRI machines doesn't make better doctors, it makes doctors better at ordering tests in lieu of diagnosis.
My point was medical technology is more advanced in the US.
(Original post by Renal)
Depends on the speciality and the banding. Many of my colleagues work 70hr weeks, some 48hr.

More experience in the US and greater reliance on technology? Source?
Please could you give more info on your "colleagues" that work 48hr weeks? I'd say there is more experience in the US, due to the work schedule i.i surgery 100hrs+ per week. Are you saying that the US and UK have equal medical technology?
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Renal
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#37
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#37
(Original post by giggler)
My point was medical technology is more advanced in the US.
(Original post by giggler)
(e.g the average UK hospital has one MRI, when I went to Atlanta, Georgia the average Admissions ward in a hospital had two MRI's) I am really sure an American residency will be REAL learning experience and make me better at whatever I decide to specialize in.
:rolleyes:
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Renal
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#38
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#38
(Original post by giggler)
Please could you give more info on your "colleagues" that work 48hr weeks?
Sure, off the top of my head I can think of three; one doing psych F1 as a supernumerary, one doing F1 A&E as a supernumerary and one doing F1 GP, again, as a supernumerary.

I'd say there is more experience in the US, due to the work schedule i.i surgery 100hrs+ per week.
Who is operating 100hrs a week? Your cousin/uncle?

Are you saying that the US and UK have equal medical technology?
Yes, the technology available in the US is available in the UK - it's just that we have less and therefore use it more sensibly.
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The Mute
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#39
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#39
Just for the record, no self respecting hospital over in the US would take you anyway.

Why, may I ask, should a PRIVATE hospital take a UK graduate from a university with absolutely no reputation, and clearly no accredation with their licensing boards over someone from their own country? Although reputation means **** all here, in the states it's a completely different matter.

With your grades of AAB, why did you not apply for medicine in the first place? Why did you chose to do your degree at Kingston university when you had the grades to get into say, UCL or Imperial College?
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giggler
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#40
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#40
(Original post by Renal)
:rolleyes:
Do you think that medical equipments will help doctors provide care? If so do you think better quality equipment's will increase that care?
(Original post by Renal)
What is this conversion course, AIUI, all you need is to the USMLE which you can do at medical school and in your first couple of years as a junior. With that you can then apply for American jobs.
Really? didnt know that. Information like this is why I set up this thread
(Original post by Renal)
I'd be really interested to know why the OP is such an idiot.
Ill tell you when you grow up
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