giggler
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#101
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#101
(Original post by suek)
But... why?!?!

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/100189.php
WOW thats an interesting read do you have anymore?
To answer your question..privately funded, superpower so can spend more on r&d than any other nation. I know the EU will also be pushing the boundaries, its just that it wont be as far or as much as in the US
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Touche
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#102
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#102
Elles is too kind She has outlined the paths available nicely.
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giggler
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#103
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#103
(Original post by suek)
Why do you compare UK GPs to neurosurgery? Even to me, it's obvious the latter will be more intense.
My mistake, do you know how many hours per week it takes to train a neurosurgeon in the UK? In the US its 7 years (the highest) 70 - 100hrs+ per week
http://residents.neurosurgery.mgh.harvard.edu/
Silly question - do UK neurosurgeons have those glasses?
(Original post by Touche)
Surgical Loupes... no, we're not that advanced :s
Halarious
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crazyhelicopter
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#104
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#104
(Original post by giggler)
How will it make you a better doctor? Well the intense workload, means you will acquire more knowledge and skills in a shorter period than you would in the UK system. Meaning you will have no choice but too learn faster and concentrate more (adaption), as you will be treating patients. You will be an attending in the US before you would be a consultant here, but with more experience and arguably more confidence.
How can taking less time to do things lead to more experience?

He tells me that hes involved with advanced virus modification.
So are a number of biomedical scientists that I know, you don't need to be a doctor to do this (at least in the UK)

My point was medical technology is more advanced in the US.
Can you give an example of any necessary technology that is available in the US and not here?

Also more MRI scanners in a hospital cant make a person a better doctor. It can however make a doctor better and faster at diagnosing. you agree?
No, an MRI scan for every patient picks up a load of unrelated things. A good doctor gets their diagnosis quickly from a good history and examination, then confirms the diagnosis by testing
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Touche
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#105
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#105
Surgical Loupes... no, we're not that advanced :s
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giggler
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#106
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#106
(Original post by Elles)
So with a biomedical science degree, options to work in America as a doctor:

- Do an American medical degree
(If your undergrad will suffice as a 'pre-med' equivalent & schools will accept international students & you can sort visa-y things for study & then presumably also to work.)
Figured I wouldnt be able to afford it $40 per year X 5 years = $200,000 plus food accomidation
(Original post by Elles)
- Do a fast track medicine degree in the UK (4 years) with the USMLE (Part I you can do after preclinical & in the UK, Part II after finals & i think has to be done in American Centre = do your elective in America, get experience of what it might be like there & sit the exam).
If you can get onto a course & then same visa-y issues.
If that possible to do electives? I thought it was all or nothing - thanks
(Original post by Elles)
- Do a standard medicine degree in the UK (5years) with the USMLE, as above.
As above.
This is what I think this more likely, except ill be applying for the 4 year with my biomed degree

(Original post by Elles)
Lots of research to do!
Another option I found out about was
http://www.rossu.edu/
www.aucmed.edu/
Both are reasonable affordable and accredited in all 50 US states.
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suek
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#107
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#107
Well there is the small fact of course that the first CT scanner was developed by a British scientist too.
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suek
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#108
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#108
(Original post by giggler)
Figured I wouldnt be able to afford it $40 per year X 5 years = $200,000 plus food accomidation
If that possible to do electives? I thought it was all or nothing - thanks

This is what I think this more likely, except ill be applying for the 4 year with my biomed degree


Another option I found out about was
http://www.rossu.edu/
www.aucmed.edu/
Both are reasonable affordable and accredited in all 50 US states.
I checked the Ross one - averages $14k a semester, so almost £70k overall. How is that reasonably affordable, compared to the UK at £3k a year for four years, and iirc the NHS support the fifth?
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ChemistBoy
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#109
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#109
(Original post by suek)
Well there is the small fact of course that the first CT scanner was developed by a British scientist too.
MRI was also co-invented by a British scientist too.
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giggler
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#110
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#110
(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
How can taking less time to do things lead to more experience?
You take less time but you may work more e.g some training in the uk might be 60 hrs or less per week while in the US its 80hr or more
(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
So are a number of biomedical scientists that I know, you don't need to be a doctor to do this (at least in the UK)
I see do you think thats its at the same level and abundance as in the US?
(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
Can you give an example of any necessary technology that is available in the US and not here?
Not off the top of my head, but im sure I could find one.
(Original post by crazyhelicopter)
No, an MRI scan for every patient picks up a load of unrelated things. A good doctor gets their diagnosis quickly from a good history and examination, then confirms the diagnosis by testing
If you read previous posts you will see i have cleared up what i meant by that.
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suek
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#111
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#111
(Original post by giggler)
Not off the top of my head, but im sure I could find one.
So there's something, some treatment or diagnostic tool, that is ONLY available in America, and even patients from the UK have to travel over there to get it do they?
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giggler
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#112
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#112
(Original post by suek)
I checked the Ross one - averages $14k a semester, so almost £70k overall. How is that reasonably affordable, compared to the UK at £3k a year for four years, and iirc the NHS support the fifth?
I did say im probably gonna to do a UK GEP. But your right. It seems ridiculous and partly why im here to broaden my options.
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Elles
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#113
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#113
(Original post by giggler)
If that possible to do electives? I thought it was all or nothing - thanks
It's usually an 'Elective' singular - AFAIK all UK medical schools have an elective period & the norm is to go abroad - ours is 10/11 weeks after finals in our 6th year. I know one person spending the whole thing in America & doing the clinical part of the USMLE & a few more visiting America for part.

If you wanted more time there quite a few universities American universities seem to do summer research programmes, so that might be an option during preclinical years & you could spend time doing work experience out there.
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giggler
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#114
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#114
(Original post by suek)
So there's something, some treatment or diagnostic tool, that is ONLY available in America, and even patients from the UK have to travel over there to get it do they?
No, they originate in the states sort of cutting edge technology, and get pass along. Just like im sure some treatment start in the UK and get passed along to the states. however percentage wise the former is greater.
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giggler
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#115
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#115
(Original post by Elles)
It's usually an 'Elective' singular - AFAIK all UK medical schools have an elective period & the norm is to go abroad - ours is 10/11 weeks after finals in our 6th year. I know one person spending the whole thing in America & doing the clinical part of the USMLE & a few more visiting America for part.

If you wanted more time there quite a few universities American universities seem to do summer research programmes, so that might be an option during preclinical years & you could spend time doing work experience out there.
V. useful info could you please PM some of the research programmes. I would be interested. I think that sounds like the best course ive verified most of what you said you've been very helpful thanks.
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suek
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#116
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#116
(Original post by giggler)
No, they originate in the states sort of cutting edge technology, and get pass along. Just like im sure some treatment start in the UK and get passed along to the states. however percentage wise the former is greater.
This is nothing more than guesswork though, based on the fact that there are more people and healthcare is completely private over there. I wouldn't base your entire career on this guesswork.
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giggler
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#117
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#117
(Original post by suek)
This is nothing more than guesswork though, based on the fact that there are more people and healthcare is completely private over there. I wouldn't base your entire career on this guesswork.
True, Would you bet against it. If I had the time I would comb over some US sites to find some prof.
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suek
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#118
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#118
(Original post by giggler)
True, Would you bet against it. If I had the time I would comb over some US sites to find some prof.
Make the time, it's your career, not mine
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Egypt
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#119
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#119
(Original post by giggler)
No, they originate in the states sort of cutting edge technology, and get pass along. Just like im sure some treatment start in the UK and get passed along to the states. however percentage wise the former is greater.
How much of this technology do you think you will be using as a student or junior doctor? By the time you are a senior surgeon/physician either side of the Atlantic you are likely to have access to very similar resources (remember that private hospitals do exist in the UK where you can scan everyone you want! )
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ChemistBoy
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#120
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#120
(Original post by giggler)
No, they originate in the states sort of cutting edge technology, and get pass along. Just like im sure some treatment start in the UK and get passed along to the states. however percentage wise the former is greater.
Yep, really fair comparison. Comparing the entire of the US with the UK in gross research output in medical science. Can't you see why that is wrong?
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