Swollen face from tooth abscess Watch

MSmith90
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Anonymous)
Do you think it’ll be okay overnight?
No one here can say for sure if it will be OK if left overnight without performing a clinical examination in person.

There is a risk that it could get worse overnight.

There is also a chance the nature of it will remain the same overnight.

If you are concerned then go to A&E or contact an out of hours dentist; although it may cost you a lot to travel by car as you previously said, this is a small price to pay for your health and wellbeing.
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Anonymous #1
#22
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#22
Thank you to everyone who replied, I went and got the surgery done; hopefully this goes some way to resolving the issue.
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DrTSR
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#23
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You have an abscess. You need to have antibiotics as it seems there is systemic involvement. Also have the tooth extracted or root canal treated(if possible) as the source of the infection is within the tooth.

I would advise you to book an emergency appointment with any local dentist or contact 111 and they will book you in to a dental practice or hospital dentist.

Sorry for delay in response I am on holiday.
Feel free to PM me or quote if you have any questions
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DrTSR
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I forgot to mention the abscess needs to be drained. though having read ur post now i can see you have already been treated. hope you feel better soon!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by DrTSR)
I forgot to mention the abscess needs to be drained. though having read ur post now i can see you have already been treated. hope you feel better soon!
Hi DrTSR, thank you for responding!

I went for the surgery as you noticed, will I still require antibiotics or should it just drain away now and the infection go?

PS: hope you’re enjoying your holiday!
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DrTSR
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Depends on if there is any systemic involvement. I would sometimes prescribe antibiotics if the swelling was large and extends to the submandibular region as the airway could be effected, if i felt drainage was not adequate.

But if drainage was adequate and the clinician who saw you was happy to discharge you then I'm sure you're in safe hands.

If you feel your swelling is getting bigger or you feel your breathing is affected then contact your dentist for an emergency or call 111 again so they can find you a dentist.
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Napp
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(Original post by Anonymous)
What should I do? Is this serious enough to warrant an emergency dental appointment?
Contrary to what others are saying this does not constitute a medical emergency so there is little point in dialing the emergency services.
Depending on exactly what has caused said abscess it may well be better to simply eat some painkillers and wait to see a normal dentist. Emergency ones have a habit of simply yanking teeth out in such instances.
Last time such a thing happened to me (wisdom tooth infection) I found it better to simply eat some codeine and make a triage appointment at the GP the next morning - or dentist depending on whom is easier/quicker.
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DrTSR
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@Napp As a dentist, I have to partly disagree. Regardless of what has caused the swelling, depending on the size, location and nature of the swelling, it could very easily warrant a medical emergency, and it is not for the patient to diagnose themselves. Many times I have sent immediate referrals to hospital from my surgery due to life threatening dental abscesses.

I would not advise waiting to book a routine appointment for any swelling at all for that matter. These swelling can very rapidly get bigger and end up blocking your airway.

No dentist should be yanking any teeth out without giving all the options and letting the patient decide. The proper treatment if the tooth can be saved is drainage and root canal treatment, otherwise drainage and extraction if the patient is happy for the tooth to be extracted.

Over the counter painkillers will seldom help relieve pain in cases of dental abscesses, so there is very little use in taking them, though they can help once the abscess has been drained.

Wisdom tooth pain is completely different to a tooth abscess. With wisdom tooth pain (pericorinitis) it is the gum that gets infectes rather than the tooth and this usually treated with jist a deep clean around the gum of the wisdom tooth and good oral hygiene, rarely are antibiotics required.
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Anonymous #1
#29
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#29
(Original post by DrTSR)
@Napp As a dentist, I have to partly disagree. Regardless of what has caused the swelling, depending on the size, location and nature of the swelling, it could very easily warrant a medical emergency, and it is not for the patient to diagnose themselves. Many times I have sent immediate referrals to hospital from my surgery due to life threatening dental abscesses.

I would not advise waiting to book a routine appointment for any swelling at all for that matter. These swelling can very rapidly get bigger and end up blocking your airway.

No dentist should be yanking any teeth out without giving all the options and letting the patient decide. The proper treatment if the tooth can be saved is drainage and root canal treatment, otherwise drainage and extraction if the patient is happy for the tooth to be extracted.

Over the counter painkillers will seldom help relieve pain in cases of dental abscesses, so there is very little use in taking them, though they can help once the abscess has been drained.

Wisdom tooth pain is completely different to a tooth abscess. With wisdom tooth pain (pericorinitis) it is the gum that gets infectes rather than the tooth and this usually treated with jist a deep clean around the gum of the wisdom tooth and good oral hygiene, rarely are antibiotics required.
I’m sorry to keep pestering you but how long should the swelling take to go away? My face is still quite swollen
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DrTSR
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#30
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can take several days. just keep an eye on it to make sure its not getting bigger.
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Anonymous #1
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#31
(Original post by Napp)
Contrary to what others are saying this does not constitute a medical emergency so there is little point in dialing the emergency services.
Depending on exactly what has caused said abscess it may well be better to simply eat some painkillers and wait to see a normal dentist. Emergency ones have a habit of simply yanking teeth out in such instances.
Last time such a thing happened to me (wisdom tooth infection) I found it better to simply eat some codeine and make a triage appointment at the GP the next morning - or dentist depending on whom is easier/quicker.
Yikes! Sounds like you had a bad dentist. I went in any case before you posted and they did a quick drain and root canal procedure
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