What is the difference between programmers and programmer who lead their company/bus? Watch

Castro
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Most/some Computer Science degree's literally goes like:

Year 1:

-Mathematics/discrete Maths
-Programming
-Networking
-Databases

Year 2:

-Object Orientated Programming
-Algorithms and Data Structures
-Web Technologies
-IT Solutions (vendor certifications)
-Software Development

Year 3:

-Software Engineering
-AI
-Computer systems
-Intelligent Computing
-Computer architecture
-Project

So they are qualified, did projects.

However some programmers go on to set up their own business's/companies in video game development, software, technologies etc.

Do they practice a lot to get this good?
Do they think in structures?
Or do they think linking things together?
Is it basically logic and they'll translate it into programming code?

What is the difference between good and very good? How do they work, think?
Last edited by Castro; 2 months ago
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winterscoming
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You have to remember that success in business isn't really about any of those things you've mentioned; it's all about making money, building a brand, earning trust with clients/customers, building relationships with suppliers and business partners, and having the mindset to be able to know when something is a good or bad idea from a business or commercial point-of-view. So creating/running a business is a lot more about things like entrepreneurial skills, leadership, and managerial skills really.

Computer Science and programming are all about solving problems, but that doesn't particularly matter much in business; the discipline of being able to establish a business and build it into a success is very different to the discipline of being able to solve problems. In some ways, having an exceptional engineering and problem-solving mindset can even be a disadvantage if it means someone ends up being more preoccupied by creating and perfecting their product/service rather than selling it or making money or asking the question about whether their efforts will translate into revenue or profit.

The most important thing that someone needs to do to create a successful business is to know how to maximise profit and minimise time/cost, while also being able to sell their product and get people to buy-in to their ideas. Unless they start out with significant financial backing (e.g. an investor-backed startup) then money will probably be extremely tight in the first few years, so there's usually no room to spend time building well-engineered solutions -- they'll need to know how to deliver a minimum-viable-product in the fastest time possible and nothing more until they can justify further time/expenditure.

Most of the time, success in a technology business has nothing whatsoever to do with creating amazing, robust, technically-excellent solutions. It's about finding the cheapest, quickest solution to a problem which is "good enough" and doesn't turn into an expensive maintenance headache. Even if the solution is technically dumb, inelegant or hacky; Any mediocre programmer can create solutions like that with no problem. If someone like that is able to think up a brilliant idea, put in an excellent sales pitch to potential investors/clients, and persuade enough of the right people to "buy in" to their idea, then that's often where they can make the breakthrough even if the technology they've created isn't very good.
Last edited by winterscoming; 2 months ago
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Castro
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(Original post by winterscoming)
You have to remember that success in business isn't really about any of those things you've mentioned; it's all about making money, building a brand, earning trust with clients/customers, building relationships with suppliers and business partners, and having the mindset to be able to know when something is a good or bad idea from a business or commercial point-of-view. So creating/running a business is a lot more about things like entrepreneurial skills, leadership, and managerial skills really.

Computer Science and programming are all about solving problems, but that doesn't particularly matter much in business; the discipline of being able to establish a business and build it into a success is very different to the discipline of being able to solve problems. In some ways, having an exceptional engineering and problem-solving mindset can even be a disadvantage if it means someone ends up being more preoccupied by creating and perfecting their product/service rather than selling it or making money or asking the question about whether their efforts will translate into revenue or profit.

The most important thing that someone needs to do to create a successful business is to know how to maximise profit and minimise time/cost, while also being able to sell their product and get people to buy-in to their ideas. Unless they start out with significant financial backing (e.g. an investor-backed startup) then money will probably be extremely tight in the first few years, so there's usually no room to spend time building well-engineered solutions -- they'll need to know how to deliver a minimum-viable-product in the fastest time possible and nothing more until they can justify further time/expenditure.

Most of the time, success in a technology business has nothing whatsoever to do with creating amazing, robust, technically-excellent solutions. It's about finding the cheapest, quickest solution to a problem which is "good enough" and doesn't turn into an expensive maintenance headache. Even if the solution is technically dumb, inelegant or hacky; Any mediocre programmer can create solutions like that with no problem. If someone like that is able to think up a brilliant idea, put in an excellent sales pitch to potential investors/clients, and persuade enough of the right people to "buy in" to their idea, then that's often where they can make the breakthrough even if the technology they've created isn't very good.
Thank you very much for this detailed, excellent post.

I've seen your other excellent replies to other people's questions, thank you for helping others .
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