is A level maths/ further maths just a matter of memorising random equations Watch

Azimbrook1
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ok, i kinda enjoy maths, however, i hate just memorising equations when i dont know where they come from or why they are the way they are (eg. Fv= pv (1+r)^n or the quadratic equation from gcse). is it going to be like that at a level maths/ FM? or is that what maths is like in general, just memorising equations and using them. is there a better way to see equations rather than some nonsense you have to memorise ( btw, ive only done my gcses)
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
ok, i kinda enjoy maths, however, i hate just memorising equations when i dont know where they come from or why they are the way they are (eg. Fv= pv (1+r)^n or the quadratic equation from gcse). is it going to be like that at a level maths/ FM? or is that what maths is like in general, just memorising equations and using them. is there a better way to see equations rather than some nonsense you have to memorise ( btw, ive only done my gcses)
Not at all like that. Unlike gcse, for A level you get a booklet with absolutely every formula you'll need. You don't need to remember any formulas at all
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Jamie_1712
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Not at all like that. Unlike gcse, for A level you get a booklet with absolutely every formula you'll need. You don't need to remember any formulas at all
That’s is completely incorrect. You do need to memorise the majority of formulas. There are only a few on the inside front page of the test paper, but not many.

With the massive amount of questions you have to do at a level before you become good/confident at a topic, you will have memorised relevant formulas. That will be the least of your concern.
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Not at all like that. Unlike gcse, for A level you get a booklet with absolutely every formula you'll need. You don't need to remember any formulas at all
Knowing where the equations come from is important, however. The formula booklet will give you all the equations and identities- there are often questions asking you to derive/prove them.
You're encouraged to learn where they all come from. I'd imagine from your post you'll enjoy how maths works at A level instead of gcse
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by Jamie_1712)
That’s is completely incorrect. You do need to memorise the majority of formulas. There are only a few on the inside front page of the test paper, but not many.

With the massive amount of questions you have to do at a level before you become good/confident at a topic, you will have memorised relevant formulas. That will be the least of your concern.
What on earth are you talking about? This summer I've just done AQA A level maths and Edexcel further maths, and got a large formula booklet with everything for both
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the bear
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
What on earth are you talking about? This summer I've just done AQA A level maths and Edexcel further maths, and got a large formula booklet with everything for both
they are probably getting confused with the GCSE paper
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Azimbrook1
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Not at all like that. Unlike gcse, for A level you get a booklet with absolutely every formula you'll need. You don't need to remember any formulas at all
alright, we dont need to MEMORISE random formulas, but arent you guys taught random formulas without knowing where they come form ( except the proof question)
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by Jamie_1712)
That’s is completely incorrect. You do need to memorise the majority of formulas. There are only a few on the inside front page of the test paper, but not many.

With the massive amount of questions you have to do at a level before you become good/confident at a topic, you will have memorised relevant formulas. That will be the least of your concern.
Don't talk utter rubbish and put people off their A levels.

This is the formula booklet I got in my A levels THIS YEAR, and it is the formula booklet that people will get in subsequent years. The other exam boards have equivalents.

https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...mulae_Book.pdf
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
alright, we dont need to MEMORISE random formulas, but arent you guys taught random formulas without knowing where they come form ( except the proof question)
Yes, but my teacher made a point of showing us where they came from. You don't need to know where some of them are from, but teachers will usually teach it anyway
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chakshita
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Okay soo, I just completed a level Edexcel maths and yes there are a lot of formulas. Yes, you do get a formula book with the majority of the formulas in it BUT there will be some formulas that you do need to memorise. Maths requires practice and the more you do a type of question, the more familiar you get with using the formula relevant to the question. For stats and mechanics, you do need to memorise a fair bit in my opinion.

(please make sure you WANT to do maths before picking it as an a level as it is very hard and requires a lot of time and practise. Don't just pick it because "everyone does it" or any other reason)
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_gcx
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
ok, i kinda enjoy maths, however, i hate just memorising equations when i dont know where they come from or why they are the way they are (eg. Fv= pv (1+r)^n or the quadratic equation from gcse). is it going to be like that at a level maths/ FM? or is that what maths is like in general, just memorising equations and using them. is there a better way to see equations rather than some nonsense you have to memorise ( btw, ive only done my gcses)
Maths is taught in a bad way in schools, it's really not about memorising formulas/equations. It causes a problem at undergrad level because maths at university is a lot different in style. The proofs of all the identities I can think of are well within the reach of an A-level student with just A-level knowledge, with the exception of some limit stuff. Many of the proofs are actually given in the textbook and you can be expected to prove them.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
alright, we dont need to MEMORISE random formulas, but arent you guys taught random formulas without knowing where they come form ( except the proof question)
With the new spec they've added in a lot more proof. You may be asked to prove the summation formulae of series, there's differentiation from first principles, they may test you on proof of the trigonometric addition formulae (though I think they give you a diagram).
Really there's not much plugging in values into formulae - what matters is how you use them and the steps you take.
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_gcx
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(Original post by chak****a)
Okay soo, I just completed a level Edexcel maths and yes there are a lot of formulas. Yes, you do get a formula book with the majority of the formulas in it BUT there will be some formulas that you do need to memorise. Maths requires practice and the more you do a type of question, the more familiar you get with using the formula relevant to the question. For stats and mechanics, you do need to memorise a fair bit in my opinion.

(please make sure you WANT to do maths before picking it as an a level as it is very hard and requires a lot of time and practise. Don't just pick it because "everyone does it" or any other reason)
would assume as the OP is also considering further maths that this won't be an issue.
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thekidwhogames
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I've completed Maths and now Further Maths and I have to say that they're great A levels. A good combination of memorization/practice will do you good. It's good to understand the derivations (you can derive nearly every formula) which certainly helped me. But practicing will help you get good at those questions. It's not STEP so it's not meant to differentiate the top mathematicians but it's rewarding in the sense that practice and sufficient understand will help you. They're inversely proportional - the better your understanding, the less practice you'll have to do as the concepts/questions become intuitive.
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by chak****a)
Okay soo, I just completed a level Edexcel maths and yes there are a lot of formulas. Yes, you do get a formula book with the majority of the formulas in it BUT there will be some formulas that you do need to memorise. Maths requires practice and the more you do a type of question, the more familiar you get with using the formula relevant to the question. For stats and mechanics, you do need to memorise a fair bit in my opinion.

(please make sure you WANT to do maths before picking it as an a level as it is very hard and requires a lot of time and practise. Don't just pick it because "everyone does it" or any other reason)
For single maths, there's not really any formulas to remember. Methods, yes. Rote formulas, no.

If you're memorising formulas then you're missing the point of the exam. Sure, you can remember many formulas for various chain rule applications. But its much better to learn the method of the chain rule.

Learning formulas is counter productive- it means people struggle when a question requires thought. Learn a method that can be adapted, not a formula that's applicable to one type of question only
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Azimbrook1
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(Original post by _gcx)
would assume as the OP is also considering further maths that this won't be an issue.
yes i am considering fm, by Why wont that be an issue, are you taught where equations come from in further maths
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
yes i am considering fm, by Why wont that be an issue, are you taught where equations come from in further maths
Again, the specification doesn't specifically require you to know where some of them come from. But most teachers will teach you it anyway
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Again, the specification doesn't specifically require you to know where some of them come from. But most teachers will teach you it anyway
An example being the formula for integrating under polar curves.
They give you the formula and will not ask you to prove it, but my teacher showed us intuitively where it came from (and most others would do too)
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Azimbrook1
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Again, the specification doesn't specifically require you to know where some of them come from. But most teachers will teach you it anyway
its just that my gcse teacher didnt teach us that, so im scared my a level teacher wont (you did say 'most' but not all)
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by Azimbrook1)
its just that my gcse teacher didnt teach us that, so im scared my a level teacher wont (you did say 'most' but not all)
My teacher was really enthusiastic guy with a maths PhD from Oxford (he was overqualified imo lol). He went the extra mile for us; some teachers may do the same, and some may not.

What sort of sixth form are you going to?
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