JMcGarry00
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Is having a masters in clinical neuropsychology and a PhD in clinical psychology a good combination? what can I do with them? and what other types of psychology can you do as a degree and what can they lead to? Thanks
2
reply
La dracu
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by JMcGarry00)
Is having a masters in clinical neuropsychology and a PhD in clinical psychology a good combination? what can I do with them? and what other types of psychology can you do as a degree and what can they lead to? Thanks
Name:  Psychology-Specialties-Infographic.jpg
Views: 490
Size:  226.5 KB
0
reply
FinalMasquerade
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
Hi JMcGarry00,

Are you referring to doing the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology? This is different from doing a PhD, as this is more of a vocational course, in which you are hired as a 'trainee clinical psychologist' for the NHS, whilst you embark on a 3 year course. The course involves 6 placements over the three years, along with teaching. You will also complete a doctoral thesis, as well as placement based projects.

The course fees are paid by the NHS, and you are also paid a band 6 salary. However, this may be revised in the upcoming years. Once you have qualified, you can then work as a qualified clinical psychologist within the NHS. It is a varying role with many avenues.

Check out the Leeds Clearing House (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/index.html) for further information.
0
reply
JMcGarry00
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
Yeah, I saw that programme at the university of Hull. However, can't I just do a PhD in clinical psychology without the NHS course? Like, what if I don't get accepted
0
reply
FinalMasquerade
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by JMcGarry00)
Yeah, I saw that programme at the university of Hull. However, can't I just do a PhD in clinical psychology without the NHS course? Like, what if I don't get accepted
You can, but a PhD would be heavily research focused. So career wise, you will end up being more suited to research based careers. Though, not for definite.

I believe Hull and York have a special undergraduate course designed to put you directly into a clinical psychology doctorate course (complete with funding and NHS employment status and salary). So that may be worth considering.
0
reply
JMcGarry00
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
Yeah. I am interested in clinical neuropsychology though. How would I become a clinical neuropsychologist? I'm assuming a PHD?
0
reply
FinalMasquerade
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by JMcGarry00)
Yeah. I am interested in clinical neuropsychology though. How would I become a clinical neuropsychologist? I'm assuming a PHD?
I am less clued up on that domain, but it appears to be that you will need a BPS accredited undergraduate psychology course, and then go on to a specific postgraduate course related to neuropsychology. You can do this through a clinical psychology doctorate, or educational psychology (which seems to now also have doctorate courses, but I am unsure of funding and salary). Finally, there is a separate BPS qualification to pass, which you are eligible for after some experience.

https://careers.bps.org.uk/area/neuro
https://www.bps.org.uk/psychologists...europsychology
0
reply
Lord Asriel
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by JMcGarry00)
Yeah. I am interested in clinical neuropsychology though. How would I become a clinical neuropsychologist? I'm assuming a PHD?
To be a clinical neuropsychologist ( that is to work clinically and be recognised by the Division of Neuropsychology in the UK), you will need to first complete your Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy). At that stage you will have to (ideally) get a Band 7 job in Neuro when you qualify and then complete the further Clinical Neuropsychology training (PGDip or MSc).

You can read about it more on the official BPS website: https://careers.bps.org.uk/area/neuro

A Ph.D will not be relelvant unless you only want to conduct research in this area. A DClinPsy is very different, as it is a practitioner training course (like medicine or nursing).
0
reply
JMcGarry00
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#9
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#9
Would a clinical neuropsychology degree only go as far as a masters? And, after getting a DClinPsy, would I get a band 7 job and training simultaneously or would it be one after another? How long does each step take?
0
reply
Lord Asriel
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by JMcGarry00)
Would a clinical neuropsychology degree only go as far as a masters? And, after getting a DClinPsy, would I get a band 7 job and training simultaneously or would it be one after another? How long does each step take?
Unfortunately, the whole area is quite a ill understood pathway, so I think it is worth elaborating upon.

1) The way the clin neuro MSc course was originaly designed as a post-DClinPsy qualification to "top up" knowledge to what you need for a long term career in clinical neuro and be eligble to get the Division of Neuropsychology specialist register. This is a masters level course, in terms of content and length, but really is a post-doctoral qualification.

However, some universities (e.g. Bristol) have a parallel academic course neuro course MSc that non-DClinPsy folk can get onto, but this will in itself not qualify you for anything (but is interesting as a field of study in itself and cover the same material). If it is helpful, think of it a bit like a university offering a medical degree as well as a biomedical science degree, with overlapping staff teams and taught material -one will fully qualify you as a medical doctor, the latter will just give you a generic science degree.

2) After you do your DClinPsy, qualified typically take a Band 7 Neurojob and some of these will encourage you to do the MSc/PGdip clinical neuropsychology course (depending on the service, they may even fund this) and provide the necessary supervision. This is alongside your job and if you look at some of the prospectuses they would expect you to be working to gain your clinical hours and relevant experience, case reports etc.

E.g. from the Bristol MSc Clin Neuro course website:
"Conforms to the British Psychological Society (BPS) accreditation standards for training in clinical neuropsychology and provides the knowledge component of the competency requirements.... The MSc intends to deliver teaching that provides both the adult knowledge and practice competencies required for entry on to the Specialist Register of Clinical Neuropsychologists.

....Alongside teaching of the Knowledge competencies, this MSc provides support as you develop your practical experience and competencies in clinical neuropsychology. Your clinical practice must be undertaken within your paid employment and you must secure appropriate supervision for your work when enrolled on the course. However, we offer additional support towards developing your case portfolio, discussion of case formats and patient cases, and help in managing supervisions."
3) How long does this take? Varies hugely. Typically you would look at:

3 years undergrad
??? Years relevant experience in variety of clinical and research settings (at least 2 years) then applying for DClinPsy
3 years DClinPsy

1 year full time -2 year part time doing the MSc ClinNeuro

Average age of getting onto a DclinPsy in 2017 was 27, so if you were average this would take you to 30 then if you jumped straight into a Band 7 Neuro and MSc Place that would make you about 32 when it was all done.
0
reply
JMcGarry00
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#11
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#11
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks a lot for your help
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by JMcGarry00)
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks a lot for your help
You have been given some top notch replies that you wouldn't get at school. However if you keep starting new threads in parallel it looks like you have a short attention span and don't listen to a thing anyone says and it may transpire that people may become reluctant to post replies .

Even grads I volunteer with have no idea what a neuropsychologist is and have no idea what QiCN is.
Last edited by marinade; 2 years ago
0
reply
bones-mccoy
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by La dracu)
Name:  Psychology-Specialties-Infographic.jpg
Views: 490
Size:  226.5 KB
I wouldn't take much notice of this image, OP (apologies to whoever posted it).

This looks to be US info so there are some difference over here in the UK. Most undergraduate degrees are three years, not 4, and most Masters degrees are just a year rather than two - assuming you're doing them full time. Psychiatrists are doctors so you'd need to do either the full undergraduate medicine degree or GEM. And then if you do want to work as a practising Psychologist you will most likely need a postgraduate qualification in the specific area you want to go into, generally Masters degrees are essential rather than optional.
1
reply
JMcGarry00
Badges: 10
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#14
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#14
Yeah, I thought that image wasn't right. Thanks
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Physics Paper 1 exam go?

Great! Feeling positive (144)
29.03%
It went fairly well (235)
47.38%
It didn't go too well (74)
14.92%
TERRIBLE! (43)
8.67%

Watched Threads

View All