Do you prefer to say HIGH SCHOOL or SECONDARY SCHOOL? Watch

MathsMania
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What do you guys call year 7 to 11?
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SlightlySummer
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Secondary, which is more common in England
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RazzzBerries
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The name of my school is "___________ high school", so I've always called it "high school". :dontknow:

I've called it secondary school when I have to explain to family members in foreign countries or older relatives who go by the US system.

Sometimes I'll say "secondary" though. It's a mix really.
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AngryRedhead
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I say high school; I know we’re not American, but I think it sounds better
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Strelzo
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High school

Although it would make more sense to call it secondary school, considering in Scotland our years are S1 - S6 (which stand for Secondary 1 - Secondary 6). The problem with this is that it doesn't have a ring to it as primary school does. Like Primary 1 sounds normal, Secondary 1 sounds stupid.

Edit: just realised that the thread stated "What do you guys call year 7 to year 11", so this doesn't apply to me lol.
Last edited by Strelzo; 1 week ago
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Wooord
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Secondary school
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quasa
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considering secondary education, by the definition I was taught comprises of GCSEs AND A levels, I would say it depends on whether your high school offers A levels, Btecs etc (if yes, then 2ndary, if no, then high school)
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Deggs_14
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Secondary school, as high school is American and besmirches the already dying British culture infiltrated by egregious Americanisms already like « movie »
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Notoriety
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To those who say "high school" is American, I refer you to this post (from identical thread from 10 months ago):

(Original post by Notoriety)
I thought it was secondary school for a long time, till I went off with a lass who studied at a very old all-girls school called Something High School. I looked it up and "high school" has continually been used in British English for some time, usually to mean a school which had no "primary" students attached. But for me, I still don't think this is correct. It only seems to be female schools which authentically have it in their names.

So I went on Wiki and listed all the latish 19th century schools which have "High School" in the name.

Spoiler:
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Loughborough HS founded in 1850, Mount St Mary's HS founded in 1853, Notre Dame Catholic HS in 1855, Notre Dame HS Southwark 1855, Notting Hill and Ealing HS in 1873, Plymouth High School for Girls founded in 1874, Manchester HS for Girls in 1874, Croydon HS in 1874, Norwich High School for Girls founded in 1875, Nottingham Girls' HS in 1875, Oxford High School founded in 1875, Brighton and Hove HS in 1876, South Hampstead HS in 1876, Edgbaston HS for Girls in 1876, Clifton High School founded in 1877, Stamford HS in 1877, Sheffield HS in 1878, Ipswich High School in 1878, Wakefield Girls' HS in 1878, Northampton HS in 1878, King's HS in 1879, Truro HS for Girls in 1880, Blackheath HS in 1880, Wimbledon HS in 1880, Colchester High School in 1882, Portsmouth HS in 1882, Teesside HS in 1883, Sunderland HS in 1883, KEHS 1883, Witton Park HS in 1883, Bromley HS in 1883, Durham HS for Girls in 1884, Surbiton HS in 1884, Birkenhead HS in 1884, High School for Girls in Gloucester in 1884, Sutton HS in 1884, Shrewsbury HS in 1885, St Philomena's HS for Girls in 1893, Putney HS in 1893, St Hilda's HS 1894, Skipton Girls' HS in 1886, Streatham and Clapham HS in 1887, Sydenham HS in 1887, Guildford High School in 1888, Wallington HS for Girls in 1888, St Albans HS for Girls in 1889, Whalley HS in 1891, Derby HS in 1892, Queen Mary's HS in 1893, Mayville High School in 1897, Brentwood Ursuline HS in 1900, Wycombe HS in 1901, Chester City HS for Girls in 1902 (became Queens Park HS), Ursuline HS in 1902, Kesteven and Sleaford HS founded in 1902, Rugby HS in 1903, Our Lady's Convent HS in 1904, Palmers Green HS in 1905, the closed Rotherham Girls' HS in 1906, Leicester HS for Girls in 1906, Bevereley HS in 1908, Selby HS in 1908.

Southend High School in 1895 was for boys, but it is not clear how longer it has continuously operated. St Andrews' HS for Boys opened in 1889 but was actually mixed. St Cuthbert's HS founded in 1881. Darwen Vale in 1894, but it is not clear if it was mixed from the beginning. St Augustine's HS in 1884 was solely for males.
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by Notoriety)
To those who say "high school" is American, I refer you to this post (from identical thread from 10 months ago):
a characteristic of Americanisms are godawful things which the British thankfully left behind generations ago, like soccer, -ize and fall
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Chronoscope
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I use high school generally. But if I'm on Reddit I'll use secondary school mainly bc Reddit is mostly an American site and high school /s secondary school and get mixled on there.
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Dunya
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#12
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HIGh sChoOL. Secondary school of course.
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Bill Nye
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secondary school - high school just sounds too american lmao
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Notoriety
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(Original post by A Rolling Stone)
a characteristic of Americanisms are godawful things which the British thankfully left behind generations ago, like soccer, -ize and fall
2 smart 4 moi
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ElNiñoo
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Secondary
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iodo345
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(Original post by MathsMania)
What do you guys call year 7 to 11?
The worst time of my life
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centraltrains
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Secondary school. A lot of schools name themselves "<name> high school", and if it is done like that I am led to believe those pupils end up calling it high school more so than the rest of population.
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aadelinamason
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(Original post by MathsMania)
What do you guys call year 7 to 11?
secondary.
as we are british
not aMerIcaN
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aadelinamason
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(Original post by A Rolling Stone)
a characteristic of Americanisms are godawful things which the British thankfully left behind generations ago, like soccer, -ize and fall
not to mention they kinda can't spell. I mean 'color'? C'mon dude!
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naem071
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High school. All the now academies in my area were formerly called 'X High School', and this is going back to their foundings in the 1950s/1960s. To call it secondary school is unheard of here.
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