Brexit Watch

ni98m
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#1
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Can someone explain in simple terms the benefits and drawbacks of brexit?
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Strelzo
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I'll sum it up in 2 words:

Brexit = No.

But in reality though, Kallisto has a solid answer, that was me just being witty.
Last edited by Strelzo; 2 weeks ago
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Kallisto
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Just to speak for the people who are against and for Brexit.

Benefits: being indedendent on the EU in terms of political decisions.

Drawback: international trades raise in prices because of the custom duties when leaving the EU.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Strelzo)
I'll sum it up in 2 words:

Brexit = No.

But in reality though, Kallisto has a solid answer, that was me just being witty.
There are more points to list, but those are the main points.

I am on your side too: a clear no to Brexit.
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Strelzo
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(Original post by Kallisto)
There are more points to list, but those are the main points.

I am on your side too: a clear no to Brexit.
Yeah, your answer was solid though. Those where the main points I would have stated, funnily enough.

I think if Brexit happened, everything would just go to crap; we're fine where we are at the moment.
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Rakas21
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#6
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(Original post by ni98m)
Can someone explain in simple terms the benefits and drawbacks of brexit?
No longer forced to provide market distorting subsidies (CAP)
No longer forced to impose tariffs on non-EU imports
No longer forced to allow foreigners to fish in UK waters (CFP - As an island nation, this is outrageous)
No longer forced to make net contributions to the EU budget (funding foreign projects)
No longer forced to accept EU state aid rules (these stop us discriminating in favour of domestic business)
No longer forced to accept the supremacy of a foreign court (most important - fundamental sovereignty)
No longer forced to accept the minority of low skilled immigrants
No longer forced to levy VAT

Those are the benefits.

In terms of the drawback there is really just one large one which is that as the UK leaves the single market and diverges it is likely that EU firms will opt against future UK investment. While this does not mean that firms will flee overnight, it does mean lost future investment as Mercedes builds their new model in France rather than the UK. This means potentially slower economic growth in the long run. In addition, participation in EU programmes would be more problematic and not guaranteed.

That scenario assumed a deal. In a No Deal scenario there may be short term disruption to the supply chain at ports ect.. where forms are unprepared. In addition the economic hit may be larger if tariffs are imposed.

..

Unlike the posters above, I have confidence in my nation and it’s ability to weather any short term disruption. Brexit offers the UK a chance to reshape its economy and renew its influence in the world.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Strelzo)
Yeah, your answer was solid though. Those where the main points I would have stated, funnily enough.

I think if Brexit happened, everything would just go to crap; we're fine where we are at the moment.
Yeah, but there is another point which makes me worry: would the entry to Britain for foreigners, be it as tourists or foreign students from abroad, not be complicated when Britain is not in EU anylonger?
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Kallisto)
Yeah, but there is another point which makes me worry: would the entry to Britain for foreigners, be it as tourists or foreign students from abroad, not be complicated when Britain is not in EU anylonger?
No, that is entirely the remit of the UK.

The UK and EU (even in no deal) have already agreed 90 day visa free access for tourists which is exactly the same arrangement we have with the USA.

For students there is an ERASMUS agreement in place.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Rakas21)
No, that is entirely the remit of the UK.

The UK and EU (even in no deal) have already agreed 90 day visa free access for tourists which is exactly the same arrangement we have with the USA.

For students there is an ERASMUS agreement in place.
Okay, that is fine.

Does ERASMUS is still valid for students then? as far as I know this just goes for countries in the EU. That is why my question.
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Last edited by Kallisto; 2 weeks ago
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Kallisto)
Okay, that is fine.

Does ERASMUS is still valid for students then? as far as I know this just goes for countries in the EU. That is why my question.
Yes, they agreed for the 2019-2020 academic year. There’s no reason to think they won’t for future years.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Yes, they agreed for the 2019-2020 academic year. There’s no reason to think they won’t for future years.
I don't think you can assume that. Erasmus costs the EU money. There would need to be an agreement about the costs of outbound and inbound students.

It is vulnerable to the same sort of problems as befell Interrail this week (which wasn't Brexit related-changes to the scheme undermined a rival product being sold by the British train operators).

You could easily see a government minister questioning why the British taxpayer should subsidise a middle class arts student on a jolly in Florence for a year when the kid reading mechanical engineering at the ex-Poly in his constituency is forking out £9250 a year.

Rightly or wrongly, and you can make a case either way. being in the EU takes decisions like that away from the prejudices of national politicians.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
I don't think you can assume that. Erasmus costs the EU money. There would need to be an agreement about the costs of outbound and inbound students.

It is vulnerable to the same sort of problems as befell Interrail this week (which wasn't Brexit related-changes to the scheme undermined a rival product being sold by the British train operators).

You could easily see a government minister questioning why the British taxpayer should subsidise a middle class arts student on a jolly in Florence for a year when the kid reading mechanical engineering at the ex-Poly in his constituency is forking out £9250 a year.

Rightly or wrongly, and you can make a case either way. being in the EU takes decisions like that away from the prejudices of national politicians.
Well personally I would be fine with that, the British state should not be encouraging its citizens to go abroad for most purposes.

That said while you are correct, If the Will was not there it would have probably already been dropped.
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DraconisAudiat
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(Original post by Rakas21)
No longer forced to accept the supremacy of a foreign court (most important - fundamental sovereignty)
Which laws are you most looking forward to revoking when we leave the EU?
Which laws have been imposed on the UK by the EU when the UK fought against it?
I've asked a lot of people this and no one has an answer.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by DraconisAudiat)
Which laws are you most looking forward to revoking when we leave the EU?
Which laws have been imposed on the UK by the EU when the UK fought against it?
I've asked a lot of people this and no one has an answer.
Generally speaking the majority of laws are not at issue (i have more issue with the ECHR's right to a family life) however that is not really the point. We have the right to complete self governance and laws which originate elsewhere (or rather directives) are foreign.

Though genetically engineered crops are one area i imagine we will diverge.
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DraconisAudiat
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Should Scotland have self governance as well?
What about Kernow, can Cornwall declare itself sovereign?
What about Saxony, should Essex and Sussex unite and wage war with Hertfordshire for the disputed lands of Middlesex?
Should every county split off into its own sovereign nation and pass its own laws?

Obviously that's ridiculous but lets go the other way, when we've left the EU which laws is it you want to pass?
Could we, for example, allow cannibalism of ginger people? Or allow slavery under the terms of Exodus 21?
No, we can't. Because if we passed those laws we'd be kicked out of the UN and no one would trade with us.

My point is, leaving the EU doesn't give us free reign to pass any law we wish and the ghost principle of 'retaining sovereignty' becomes absurd if you follow the thread for more than a second.

So I'll ask the inverse this time, if you can't name any laws the EU has forced on us, what laws has remaining in the EU prevented the UK from passing?
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