Should i change my university course to get a better chance of a job in finance? Watch

Jake Smith8991
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I am currently studying at Warwick and I am doing International Management, I am doing well in the course and got a high first during my first year. But during the year I heard lots of people laughing about the course and how it was worthless, so now I am unsure whether to change my course to Economics or something else to try and increase my employability in the finance sector, please may you give some advice.
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Jake Smith8991)
I am currently studying at Warwick and I am doing International Management, I am doing well in the course and got a high first during my first year. But during the year I heard lots of people laughing about the course and how it was worthless, so now I am unsure whether to change my course to Economics or something else to try and increase my employability in the finance sector, please may you give some advice.
Don't be daft - you are at Warwick - you need to get placements. and a good degree and you will be fine. You need to be thinking about graduate trainee schemes and get appropriate work experience

You are doing well - just ignore those people. If you were at a cruddy university it would be different
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ahumanbeing_
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If you enjoy your course and you’re doing well, definitely stick with it. Business management is a good degree, the fact that you’re at Warwick is even better. Don’t listen to those who laugh at you. A business management degree is fine if you want to work in finance sectors as long as you get a 2.1
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DrBin
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Bruh, your degree is pretty damn good.
The people who laugh at your degree are elitist, because economics ranks higher than the business & management at Warwick, but its the difference between 3rd and 8th - wherein last year the 8th was previously at 3rd. Either way your degree is easily high enough to beat most candidates if we're basing it off of that metric.
Economics is one of the most congested degrees that exist. There's way too many of them. Now Warwick is a top of the line university - you will be considerably more employable than most of your economic degree holding opponents from different places if you don't live local when you go job hunting.
IM is cut in the shape of most business degrees at the start. My advice to you is what path you want to take in it. Do you want to learn more Accounting, typical business studies, management, economics, business stats and analytics; or do you want to focus on the international face of it. Either way it should sufficiently act as a suitable foundation for finding employment in any business and finance sector.


It helped me decide what I wanted to do when I considered not what I thought I wanted to do as a job; but what actually fulfilled me as a challenge and made me happy. I realised that I like a clear set goal that I can strive for - where the change I made is clearly visible and traceable. An example of this would be reducing a client's tax bill or reducing the amount spent on costs of materials in a manufacturing dept. The point is you've got to not also think about the job you want; but how the job needs to be approached and worked.

My personal advice - decide what makes you tick in regard to how you want to work, then decide what sort of areas in finance suit you then gun for them. Also I don't know how much free time you have - but most business related degrees only have 10-12 hours contact time. Why not just sneak into the economics lectures if possible? or ask the lecturer for the oncoming first years to let you sit in the back of year 1 economics? If you were interested in it you could also ask for the reading lists for the economics modules and read them at your leisure. Furthermore, you're doing international management - how are you in foreign languages? maybe work on one with duolingo or other more focused services? Big firms LOVE foreign language speakers.

When you get to job hunting, you'll notice that most graduate schemes mainly filter out by UCAS points, then the test scores, then the interviews. So actually doing extra curricular will make a much more significant impact on your job applications over which degree you did - unless you're applying for a job titled "Wanted, Graduate Economist" - and you may as well apply anyway, because the worst that happens is you get turned down.
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HeyThereHarry
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When I was applying to PwC this past year—and i believe it's the same across the big four—, they didn't ever ask what degree I did (languages). It's more about linking whatever experiences you've had to why you're a fit for the job. People who laugh at your subject are themselves misunderstanding the graduate job market IMO.
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BusMan21
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They don't care about what you study.

You're at Warwick - so take advantage of being at a Target uni and make sure you're applying to internships. Attend campus events/dinners/presentations/networking events etc.
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