supersonicganan
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
How do the examiners work out the overall Maths AS level grade? Do they add up the three perentages and divide by 300? Then 80% is an A, 70% is a B and so on
0
reply
Faiza.
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 11 years ago
#2
(Original post by supersonicganan)
How do the examiners work out the overall Maths AS level grade? Do they add up the three perentages and divide by 300? Then 80% is an A, 70% is a B and so on

Nope just add up all the numbers from the three modules [since they're all outta 100] and then work out the grade. So 240 would be an A. 210 would be a B and so forth.
0
reply
remiredo
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report 11 years ago
#3
but I thought that grade boundaries were defined by taking into account the difficulty of the exam... so that if the exam was really really difficult and A can be 70% or if it's easy an A can be 85% etc...
0
reply
Sanjetti
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 years ago
#4
(Original post by remiredo)
but I thought that grade boundaries were defined by taking into account the difficulty of the exam... so that if the exam was really really difficult and A can be 70% or if it's easy an A can be 85% etc...
You're right, but I would read this thread, its really enlightening:

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=404653
0
reply
Faiza.
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report 11 years ago
#5
(Original post by remiredo)
but I thought that grade boundaries were defined by taking into account the difficulty of the exam... so that if the exam was really really difficult and A can be 70% or if it's easy an A can be 85% etc...
Actually yeah true. But UMS boundaries never change. So in that case I dunno what happens
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 years ago
#6
(Original post by remiredo)
but I thought that grade boundaries were defined by taking into account the difficulty of the exam... so that if the exam was really really difficult and A can be 70% or if it's easy an A can be 85% etc...
they consider that before they give you a UNS mark i.e. you get 50/75, and its a hard exam, so instead of 67 UMS they give, say, 75.

UMS grade boundaries never change. that's the whole point in them.
0
reply
remiredo
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#7
Report 11 years ago
#7
(Original post by Sanjetti)
You're right, but I would read this thread, its really enlightening:

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=404653
wow all that seems complex :eek:
0
reply
MathematicalMind
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 11 years ago
#8
raw marks are scaled up or down depending on the difficulty of the exam. so say the exam is out of 75 raw marks and it was hard then an A (80/100 ums) might be 58/75 but if the exam was easy then it may be 62/75 etc.
0
reply
nuodai
Badges: 14
#9
Report 11 years ago
#9
1. Each module exam mark (out of 72, based on number of correct answers) -> UMS score (out of 100, based on exam score and exam difficulty)
2. UMS scores are added together (out of 300)
3. Overall grade given based on UMS score:
A - 240/300 - 80% and above
B - 210/300 - 70% and above
C - 180/300 - 60% and above
D - 150/300 - 50% and above
E - 120/300 - 40% and above
U - 119/300 - 39.67% and below
0
reply
LStudent
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#10
Report 8 years ago
#10
I'm slightly confused. So if I scores went something like:
20, 40, 60 does that mean I failed the As or passed it?
Can you fail a paper and still get graded a d for example?
0
reply
mjtriggs
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 8 years ago
#11
Based on the difficulty of the exam, they will scale your mark (out of 72) to a UMS marks out of 100.
The UMS Boundaries never change. It is always 80% for an A, 70% for a B etc.

On harder papers, the marks are scaled up by more. A 48 on a hard paper may get you a higher UMS mark than a 50 on an easier paper, for example. Does this explain it?
0
reply
LStudent
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#12
Report 8 years ago
#12
Well what I'm trying to ask is if you failed lets say c2, but you passed c1 and statistics with a 40/75 and a 60/75 mark would you have enough marks to get the full as-level qualification? Or is failing a paper mean you've failed the entire thing?
0
reply
mjtriggs
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 years ago
#13
Failing one paper doesn't mean you've failed the whole thing, but it'll certainly stop you achieving anything above a C/D - even if you got 100 UMS on the other two.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19
  • University for the Creative Arts
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19
  • University of Gloucestershire
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (56)
66.67%
No I haven't decided yet (18)
21.43%
Yes but I might change my mind (10)
11.9%

Watched Threads

View All