mollymustard
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#61
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#61
(Original post by Charliewantstogotouni!)
This is completely unrelated im sorry - but how do you change the colour of you name? Your grey colour looks really cool

I get the feeling a lot of it is pointing out the obvious though and explaining it.
but there is so much VOCAB to learn ARGH. and those flipping theorists. DULL.
Basically, to change your colour you have to subscribe to the student room. It costs £3.50 a month, or £10 for three months and you get a few other privledges too. Have a look under the home tab, theres a link to 'subscribe' and you can get some more info.

Urgh, I know the vocab is a total nightmare. As long as you know a few theories and things to drop in though, you should be fine!
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Charliewantstogotouni!
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#62
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(Original post by mollymustard)
Basically, to change your colour you have to subscribe to the student room. It costs £3.50 a month, or £10 for three months and you get a few other privledges too. Have a look under the home tab, theres a link to 'subscribe' and you can get some more info.

Urgh, I know the vocab is a total nightmare. As long as you know a few theories and things to drop in though, you should be fine!

Oh, ok cool - thanks

yeah - eurgh about it all. Im just trying to get it into my head really. Im more worried about music though - english is just easier to revise. I dont even need a brilliant mark on this paper so i dont know why im bothering so much.
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bruisepristine
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#63
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#63
(Original post by RosiePosiePuddingAndPie)

And the date that the dictionary was first published - I always want to use that in my Language Change responses, and I can never remember it! :p:
the first English dictionary was by Robert Cawdrey in 1604 but the one you're probably thinking of was Samuel Johnson's - largely acknowledged as the first fully comprehensive (and most influential for at least a hundred years) dictionary, which was 1755. You could just refer to the 'age of the lexicographer' as in 17th-18th centuries if you think that'd make more sense, or you can't remember specific dates/names.
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RosiePosiePuddingAndPie
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#64
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(Original post by bruisepristine)
the first English dictionary was by Robert Cawdrey in 1604 but the one you're probably thinking of was Samuel Johnson's - largely acknowledged as the first fully comprehensive (and most influential for at least a hundred years) dictionary, which was 1755. You could just refer to the 'age of the lexicographer' as in 17th-18th centuries if you think that'd make more sense, or you can't remember specific dates/names.
Yeah, Samuel Johnson's is the one I was thinking of. I think I might make '1755' the last thing I think of before I go into the exam, and then write it down as soon as I open the paper I don't know why I think it's so important, but I always want to use it :p:
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Archibald246
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#65
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#65
I'm going to try and spend the whole day doing this today... Is that enough? Ah well I guess it's going to have to be! I'm just going to look at theories and things. Also the dates of the war... My teacher is always saying 'this is just after the war....' and I have no idea when the wars were! Good luck to everyone too!
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QI Elf
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#66
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Can anyone tell me what impact the King James Bible had on language change and when was it published etc?

Thanks xxx
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Singh42
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#67
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#67
(Original post by QI Elf)
Can anyone tell me what impact the King James Bible had on language change and when was it published etc?

Thanks xxx
made religion more widespread. Bible used to be written in Latin and King James changed this to English in 1611.
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PippaLove
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#68
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#68
(Original post by RosiePosiePuddingAndPie)
There doesn't seem to be that much you can revise though, I find.
Are you kidding! I've done ALOT of revision...
Old english through to late modern english, development and features of each period, reasons for change, framework features to pick out...
and for acquisition...
I've learned loads of thories in the four areas... inateness, social interactive etc. What to expect of children of certain ages, again framework features to pick out...
and loads more. I've filled a folder with notes.
This isn't me showing off. It's just that in my eyes there is ALOT to learn
Perhaps I have a rubbish memory.
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Green Hat
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#69
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#69
I've been trying to revise English ENB6 for the past few days and there isn't much you can revise apart from a few bits of specialist vocab and some theorists. I just hope we dont get a horrible question. My teacher said that we've overdue a tough question which is annoying.
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Archibald246
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#70
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is it me or for language change is there generally on older source and a more recent one?
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RosiePosiePuddingAndPie
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#71
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(Original post by ManxKirsty)
is it me or for language change is there generally on older source and a more recent one?
I kind of assumed that was the point!
There's two questions, and usually for one there's an old and a new source, and you have to compare them, while for the other, it's just one old text to write about.
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Singh42
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#72
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#72
(Original post by RosiePosiePuddingAndPie)
I kind of assumed that was the point!
There's two questions, and usually for one there's an old and a new source, and you have to compare them, while for the other, it's just one old text to write about.
which one would u do? Compare or analyse just the 1?
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RosiePosiePuddingAndPie
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#73
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#73
(Original post by ADhatt)
which one would u do? Compare or analyse just the 1?
I'm not sure. I always said I'd analyse the one, because you can always mention 'modern society' and the English we speak today, even though you only have the old source. However, in one or two mock papers I've seen, I've preferred the comparison question, so I guess I'll just see what the sources are like in the exam
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hannah-mai
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#74
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#74
agh, I'm so terrified about this exam! my teacher for the language aquisition part has been useless. I'm frantically reading over notes but finding that I'm so nervous that nothing seems to be going in too much. What do people think are the most crucial things to consider in this exam? And if you've done a mock paper or two which has been marked by your teacher and scored highly, how did you structure your answer? Did you look at each of the language frameworks in paragraphs, for example?

Sorry for all the questions! The only thing I have to share which might help is a way of remembering when Johnson's dictionary was published: in class, we did a multiple choice quiz in which one of the questions was 'how is 1755 significant to language change', to which one of the answers was 'because it's 5 minutes before the Simpsons starts'! Obviously, the real answer is because that is the year that Dr Johnson's dictionary was published... but the Simpsons thing has proved a good way of remembering the date!
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Belle-x
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#75
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#75
How would you go about mentioning when the dictionary was published then...?

Argh, I'm so scared for this exam
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Archibald246
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#76
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#76
(Original post by RosiePosiePuddingAndPie)
I kind of assumed that was the point!
There's two questions, and usually for one there's an old and a new source, and you have to compare them, while for the other, it's just one old text to write about.
Lol what I mean is, of the older ones, one seems to be a very old one whereas the other old one is a more recent old one? If that makes sense!
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Archibald246
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#77
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(Original post by Belle-x)
How would you go about mentioning when the dictionary was published then...?

Argh, I'm so scared for this exam

Look at the date that the source is created in, and then when you are talking about the context say 'this is (before/after) the date the dictionary was created so language use and spelling is general is likely to be (less/more) standardised. Or something like that....
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RosiePosiePuddingAndPie
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#78
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(Original post by ManxKirsty)
Lol what I mean is, of the older ones, one seems to be a very old one whereas the other old one is a more recent old one? If that makes sense!
Ohhh I see what you mean! I hadn't noticed, but I'm not very observant :p:


And I love that Simpsons thing to remember the dictionary date, I'm so remembering that!
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Singh42
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#79
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When we mean "Standardized" , what these dictionaries, printing press, and other innovations taught us were forms of prescriptivism. A way of telling us what to do, and not how it is supposed to be done. In all fairness, who actually has the right to make the rules of English up? Its totally up to us, and because these dictionaries were so popular, as too with the printing press, its for this reason which was the root cause of "Standardization".
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wazza07
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#80
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I've been revising for this exam for a whole..........2 hours.
I find no matter how much theory you learn, you'll probably end up using like 2% of it. I'm not focusing to much on the theory as clearly it's a data based exam - as long as you have a basic understanding I think you can blag your way through this. It's just using the frameworks which annoys me.
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