Wildstar
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Advice me pls
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ecolier
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(Original post by Wildstar)
Advice me pls
Do Medicine first. You may change your mind during med school.

After medical school it's 2 years Foundation Programme, then 7 years Ophthalmology specialty training
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Wildstar
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(Original post by ecolier)
Do Medicine first. You may change your mind during med school.

After medical school it's 2 years Foundation Programme, then 7 years Ophthalmology specialty training
Oh so it's not a surgical speciality?
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Democracy
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(Original post by Wildstar)
Oh so it's not a surgical speciality?
The majority of ophthalmologists practise surgical ophthalmology. You do not need to complete general surgery training or general surgery exams in order to do this.

There are also a minority who are medical ophthalmologists.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Wildstar)
Oh so it's not a surgical speciality?
No, it's not part of the surgical specialties so you don't need to do Core Surgical Training.

It is competitive, the ratio was 3.74 to 1 last year for entry at ST1.

Read https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/wp-content...er-Feb2017.pdf

Outline of Specialist Training
Following the two foundation years, doctors apply for specialist training; in ophthalmology this normally lasts seven years, is competence based and leads to a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT). The essential, or core, requirements are described by a series of nested learning outcomes. These are derived from a description of what consultant ophthalmologists, as health care professionals in the UK, are able to do and how they approach their practice. During the first two years the trainee should acquire the general clinical skills of an ophthalmologist, and have a basic knowledge of the conditions covered by the specialty. As well as general and specialist clinics and ophthalmic casualty work the trainee will attend two theatre sessions per week. During these sessions he/she should master the commonly performed procedures, and assist at more complex operations. Surgical simulation using virtual reality simulators and model eyes is an integral part of the curriculum and this enables trainees to master the basic steps of a surgical procedure before performing live surgery. Trainees may want to become involved in clinical research projects

The FRCO Exam
In order to obtain a CCT it is necessary to complete the postgraduate FRCOphth examinations before the end of training.

FRCOphth consists of three parts:
Part 1 FRCOphth
No previous experience in ophthalmology is necessary to sit the Part 1 FRCOphth. Part 1 FRCOphth can be sat after completion of the F1 year and before entering OST. The examination is based on the learning outcomes from the curriculum for the first two years of training. This includes basic sciences, theoretical optics, pathology and clinical investigation.

The examination consists of two papers:-

A 3 hour 120, single best answer from 4 Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ) paper
A 2 hour Constructed Response Questions (CRQ) paper

The Part 1 exam must be passed by the end of the second year of training (OST2).

The Refraction Certificate
This is a practical OSCE examination and tests clinical refraction – retinoscopy and the prescription of glasses. The Refraction Certificate must be passed by the end of the third year of training (OST3).

Part 2 FRCOphth
The Part 2 FRCOphth has a written component and a clinical component. The examination is based on the learning outcomes from the whole OST curriculum.

Written Component
A 180, single best answer from 4, MCQ paper. The MCQ paper is sat in two halves of 90 MCQs over two hours each. The written component must be passed in order to proceed to the oral component.

Oral Component
The first part of the oral component is a Structured Viva consisting of five 10 minute stations assessing patient management and investigation, evidence based medicine and research, health promotion, ethics and professional judgement.The second part is a clinical OSCE examination consisting of six stations assessing clinical and communication skills.The Part 2 FRCOphth must be passed before the end of the final year of training (OST7).

Final accreditation is achieved when all the competencies set down in the OST curriculum are completed and FRCOphth has been awarded.
Last edited by ecolier; 1 year ago
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Wildstar
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(Original post by Democracy)
The majority of ophthalmologists practise surgical ophthalmology. You do not need to complete general surgery training or general surgery exams in order to do this.

There are also a minority who are medical ophthalmologists.
(Original post by ecolier)
No, it's not part of the surgical specialties so you don't need to do Core Surgical Training.

It is competitive, the ratio was 3.74 to 1 last year.

Read https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/wp-content...er-Feb2017.pdf

Outline of Specialist Training
Following the two foundation years, doctors apply for specialist training; in ophthalmology this normally lasts seven years, is competence based and leads to a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT). The essential, or core, requirements are described by a series of nested learning outcomes. These are derived from a description of what consultant ophthalmologists, as health care professionals in the UK, are able to do and how they approach their practice. During the first two years the trainee should acquire the general clinical skills of an ophthalmologist, and have a basic knowledge of the conditions covered by the specialty. As well as general and specialist clinics and ophthalmic casualty work the trainee will attend two theatre sessions per week. During these sessions he/she should master the commonly performed procedures, and assist at more complex operations. Surgical simulation using virtual reality simulators and model eyes is an integral part of the curriculum and this enables trainees to master the basic steps of a surgical procedure before performing live surgery. Trainees may want to become involved in clinical research projects
Sounds quite interesting!!! Thanks.
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