Zarella Murray
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Techniques for Fashion and Textiles are very known (appliqué, batik, embroidery, screen printing etc.), but I can't find any for Illustration and Graphics... I'm not sure if using different mediums count as different techniques or if there are techniques within each medium that examiners look for in Graphics and Illustration Projects. ~ Studying A-Level (Exam board: University of the Arts London)
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University of the Arts London Student Reps
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(Original post by Zarella Murray)
Techniques for Fashion and Textiles are very known (appliqué, batik, embroidery, screen printing etc.), but I can't find any for Illustration and Graphics... I'm not sure if using different mediums count as different techniques or if there are techniques within each medium that examiners look for in Graphics and Illustration Projects. ~ Studying A-Level (Exam board: University of the Arts London)
Hi there!

I would say UAL doesn't particularly look at techniques. Approaching it in a "checklist" or "tick the boxes" isn't a good idea. Although the examiners are judging to the quality of the work alongside its context, they're not looking for whether you've done a specific thing or not. Also, UAL is more ideas driven. So think about what it is you want to make, why and how.

However, in terms of techniques and how to approach things, be willing to explore both analogue and digital methods. Try to vary your practice rather than sticking to one. So do monoprints, make some illustrations by hand AND digitally on Illustrator, go wild! The more you explore, the better; it'll make you realise what kind of a "creative" person are you. One thing that UAL does definitely like is exploration and experimentation!

Here are some to start you of with:

- Adobe Creative Cloud (Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign are KEY - especially in Graphic Design)
- traditional print (risograph, monoprint, screenprint, letterpress printing etc)
- collage
- classic sketching with pen, pencil
- 3D composition (physical objects - leading into art direction)

Illustration and Graphic Design is soooooo broad and could cover anything/everything. So have fun exploring and figuring things out, regardless if it doesn't feel "graphics" or "illustration" enough. It's all about the images you're making. For example, a former flatmate currently does Illustration in Camberwell, but she uses a technique called tufting; she makes giant rugs with her illustrations. Never limit yourself! Think about you like doing and making.

Also, document your thought process behind these: what you like, what you don't like, what was successful, what wasn't so successful, what can you do to improve your work in your next attempts. This should help you find YOUR technique.

Any other questions, let me know! Happy to help!

All the Best,
Charlene
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Zarella Murray
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#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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(Original post by University of the Arts London Student Reps)
Hi there!

I would say UAL doesn't particularly look at techniques. Approaching it in a "checklist" or "tick the boxes" isn't a good idea. Although the examiners are judging to the quality of the work alongside its context, they're not looking for whether you've done a specific thing or not. Also, UAL is more ideas driven. So think about what it is you want to make, why and how.

However, in terms of techniques and how to approach things, be willing to explore both analogue and digital methods. Try to vary your practice rather than sticking to one. So do monoprints, make some illustrations by hand AND digitally on Illustrator, go wild! The more you explore, the better; it'll make you realise what kind of a "creative" person are you. One thing that UAL does definitely like is exploration and experimentation!

Here are some to start you of with:

- Adobe Creative Cloud (Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign are KEY - especially in Graphic Design)
- traditional print (risograph, monoprint, screenprint, letterpress printing etc)
- collage
- classic sketching with pen, pencil
- 3D composition (physical objects - leading into art direction)

Illustration and Graphic Design is soooooo broad and could cover anything/everything. So have fun exploring and figuring things out, regardless if it doesn't feel "graphics" or "illustration" enough. It's all about the images you're making. For example, a former flatmate currently does Illustration in Camberwell, but she uses a technique called tufting; she makes giant rugs with her illustrations. Never limit yourself! Think about you like doing and making.

Also, document your thought process behind these: what you like, what you don't like, what was successful, what wasn't so successful, what can you do to improve your work in your next attempts. This should help you find YOUR technique.

Any other questions, let me know! Happy to help!

All the Best,
Charlene
Student Rep.
Thank you so much! That was very helpful. (: I'll definitely go into creating my imagery with the intent to experiment rather than conform. I was really torn between whether to specialise in graphics/illustration or fashion/textiles as I enjoy working with the body and figures in general, but in a more Bart Hess & Lucy McRae approach, with a larger focus on photography and digital collage rather than wearable garments or costumes. Your message has given me more confidence in being freer with my approach... Unless you think my intentions sound like they would be better suited to a fashion/textiles context? If I spend most of my time creating textures to put on the body, rather than photographing the dressed body and editing it, would that not suit the graphics/illustration context so much?
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University of the Arts London Student Reps
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(Original post by Zarella Murray)
Thank you so much! That was very helpful. (: I'll definitely go into creating my imagery with the intent to experiment rather than conform. I was really torn between whether to specialise in graphics/illustration or fashion/textiles as I enjoy working with the body and figures in general, but in a more Bart Hess & Lucy McRae approach, with a larger focus on photography and digital collage rather than wearable garments or costumes. Your message has given me more confidence in being freer with my approach... Unless you think my intentions sound like they would be better suited to a fashion/textiles context? If I spend most of my time creating textures to put on the body, rather than photographing the dressed body and editing it, would that not suit the graphics/illustration context so much?
Hi Zarella,

Hope all is well! Glad those were helpful!

I mean, it all depends on your practice. On my graphic design course, people have come out with fashion outcomes for their projects. But then again, interests can change while you study so it depends on what your end goal is, career-wise?

What are your plans after A-Level? Would you consider studying a foundation? If you unsure between graphics/illustration or fashion/textiles, maybe this could be an option for you! It's a pre-degree course designed to allow you to find a specialism for the undergrad course. It'll also allow you to prepare studying on a University format, rather than A-Level. We currently have a few on hand under UAL. You can check them out here:
https://www.arts.ac.uk/subjects/3d-d...vel=Pre-degree]https://www.arts.ac.uk/subjects/3d-design-and-product-design/pre-degree-courses?collection=ual-courses-meta-prod&query=!nullquery&start_rank=1&sort=relevance&f.Subject-test|subject=3D%20design%20and%20product%20design&f.Course%20level|level=Pre-degree]

Hope that helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

All the Best,
Charlene
Student Rep.
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