Russell Group admitting students with CDD Watch

harrysbar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#21
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#21
(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
48 points is like DD, right?

In all honesty, I'm not sure a student achieving those grades (unless there are serious extenuating circumstances involved) would be best carrying on to an undergraduate degree. I'd be really interested to know how many of those students actually go on to complete a full undergraduate degree.

There are loads of great options for people out there- I'd be advising a student in that situation to have a look at apprenticeships and other, similar routes which can lead to great careers!
Yup DD or EEE or Btec National PPP
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#22
Report 1 week ago
#22
(Original post by harrysbar)
Yup DD or EEE or Btec National PPP
Yeah, at that level I think it's definitely worth looking into alternatives to uni. I know a couple of people who've built careers in finance purely through taking industry exams- which might be a good route for people with those kinds of grades.

Uni isn't for everyone (especially at 18) and 4 years of uni can lead to a lot of debt and wasted money, unfortunately.
0
reply
The RAR
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#23
Report 1 week ago
#23
Me: "I got CDD but my offer was A*AA for a Dentistry course, can you please still let me in?"
UCL: "Let us check first..hmmm....seems like we are short handed, sure we can let you in"
Me : "Really?"
UCL : "Yeah congratulations, you got yourself a place at UCL"
Me : "Thank you so much"
UCL: "No problem, we are glad to have your money on board"
Me : "What my.... money?"
UCL: "Opps sorry, I meant you on board :colone:"
5
reply
Oxford Mum
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#24
Report 1 week ago
#24
(Original post by harrysbar)
Some of the leading Russell Group unis such as Leeds, Sheffield, Southampton and Queen Mary's are offering foundation courses in Clearing for people with grades as low as CDD.

The courses are charged at the full £9,250 tuition fees, whereas a cheaper alternative for students (and taxpayers) would have been for them to retake their A levels before reapplying to uni the following year, or to do an Access course instead.

The number of degrees with Foundation years has grown enormously in the last 5 years and are obviously appealing for students desperate to get into a top uni. But are they always a good idea?

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...rades-low-cdd/
I have just been speaking to someone whose nephew did a foundation year at a top RG uni (think it was something like aeronautics or aerodynamics). He passed foundation year and has happily joined the degree proper.
0
reply
Chinemerem1
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#25
Report 1 week ago
#25
Feeling really dumb, I thought CDD was a disorder from the title
0
reply
She-Ra
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#26
Report 1 week ago
#26
(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I have just been speaking to someone whose nephew did a foundation year at a top RG uni (think it was something like aeronautics or aerodynamics). He passed foundation year and has happily joined the degree proper.
I can see how some STEM subjects can be well supported by a foundation year in some cases.

I don’t agree that it’s necessary to do one in a more exploratory subject like sociology or politics and these are being offered far more widely now.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#27
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#27
(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I have just been speaking to someone whose nephew did a foundation year at a top RG uni (think it was something like aeronautics or aerodynamics). He passed foundation year and has happily joined the degree proper.
They are a good option for some people - glad it worked out in his case
(Original post by She-Ra)
I can see how some STEM subjects can be well supported by a foundation year in some cases.

I don’t agree that it’s necessary to do one in a more exploratory subject like sociology or politics and these are being offered far more widely now.
Agree that they seem to make more sense with STEM subjects, especially where applicants have chosen the wrong A level subjects (or equivalent) and offer a way of solving that problem
0
reply
ThatJosh
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#28
Report 1 week ago
#28
(Original post by 999tigger)
In most cases I suggest avoiding foundation and suggest resits or access as an alternative. Slightly more tempting if its RG, but I would be concerned why I got CDD in the first place, the extra cost, but more importantly the impact on my limited student loan entitlement.
What do you mean "limited"? Surely they still give you the full loan for 4 years, no?
0
reply
Aaryra
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#29
Report 1 week ago
#29
I personally just don’t see the appeal of foundation courses. Why not just retake a levels? It’s so much cheaper and foundation courses don’t offer much of an advantage.
0
reply
Oxford Mum
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#30
Report 1 week ago
#30
When I spoke to my friend last night, she insisted that he definitely was receiving funding for the full four years. And to answer another question, if he passed the foundation year he was guaranteed a place on the three year course

These are, of course, important questions that you need to ask the unis themselves before you apply.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#31
Report 1 week ago
#31
(Original post by ThatJosh)
What do you mean "limited"? Surely they still give you the full loan for 4 years, no?
We see a lot of students on tsr who want to transfer after the foundation year to another university. Student finance consider that switch to be using the gift year of funding so those students are then stuck with the new university and won’t be funded for a restart or repeat if things don’t work out on the new course.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#32
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#32
(Original post by Aaryra)
I personally just don’t see the appeal of foundation courses. Why not just retake a levels? It’s so much cheaper and foundation courses don’t offer much of an advantage.
It's definitely cheaper to retake A levels and doesn't tie students down to any one uni if they decide after a few months or the first year that they have made a mistake with their choice of uni, since they haven't used any of their student finance allocation.

As muttley pointed out, however, it could be more difficult to retake Science A levels privately due to the practical element of the course
Last edited by harrysbar; 1 week ago
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#33
Report 1 week ago
#33
(Original post by ThatJosh)
What do you mean "limited"? Surely they still give you the full loan for 4 years, no?
You get degree funding for degree length +1.

If things go wrong, you fail , you fall ill, you get depressed, you want to switch course, then you need to do so before you go into the second year of funding i.e after foundation year and before the degree proper or you could end up with funding issues.
In contrast Access to he courses are funded from a different source and can be written off.
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#34
Report 1 week ago
#34
(Original post by harrysbar)
It's definitely cheaper to retake A levels and doesn't tie students down to any one uni if they decide after a few months or the first year that they have made a mistake with their choice of uni, since they haven't used any of their student finance allocation.

As muttley pointed out, however, it could be more difficult to retake Science A levels privately due to the practical element of the course
Other subjects have coursework elements so it is not just science.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#35
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#35
Some information for anyone reading this thread considering foundation versus retaking A levels independently - another option would be to ask your school whether they could support you if you wanted to do resits there

https://brightknowledge.org/educatio...-independently
0
reply
She-Ra
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#36
Report 1 week ago
#36
(Original post by harrysbar)
Some information for anyone reading this thread considering foundation versus retaking A levels independently - another option would be to ask your school whether they could support you if you wanted to do resits there

https://brightknowledge.org/educatio...-independently
This is really helpful, thank you for sharing
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#37
Report 1 week ago
#37
(Original post by harrysbar)
Some of the leading Russell Group unis such as Leeds, Sheffield, Southampton and Queen Mary's are offering foundation courses in Clearing for people with grades as low as CDD.

The courses are charged at the full £9,250 tuition fees, whereas a cheaper alternative for students (and taxpayers) would have been for them to retake their A levels before reapplying to uni the following year, or to do an Access course instead.

The number of degrees with Foundation years has grown enormously in the last 5 years and are obviously appealing for students desperate to get into a top uni. But are they always a good idea?

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...rades-low-cdd/
Wow.

Certainly would not expect this from Leeds, Sheffield or Southampton. These foundation programs are certainly becoming 'the easy route' into a top Uni, short term I dont think its that big of a deal if numbers are limited but if this continues I dont see how the Universities reputation doesnt get hit.

No doubt these students are not as talented (on average than those achieving ABB).

Personally I would be disappointed if I found out my Uni was doing this, I think the Unis are just doing this for additional revenue as they have seen the cash cow that foundation/access schemes have provided.

Although this isn't entirely new I have known people get into Unis such as Loughborough, Leicester & Cardiff with similar grades.

I think Unis should have both a departmental/course minimum entry standard but maybe a whole Uni one as well.
Last edited by mnot; 1 week ago
2
reply
mnot
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#38
Report 1 week ago
#38
Just curious do people think DoE should put in measures to prevent unqualified candidates being accepted into Uni, just so the Uni can make an extra 9K?

Would it make sense for the student finance rules to change so in order to qualify for finance you must gain say BBB, and you are partially eligible if you achieve CCC (or equivalent).
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#39
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#39
They seem like they are going to be a massive thing in Clearing this year. Just noticed on the Swansea website they are saying that they have a "guaranteed offers" scheme which means that everyone who applies is guaranteed to get an offer for either the course they applied for, a similar course or a foundation course. The only exceptions are for things like Medicine/Healthcare/social work
Last edited by harrysbar; 1 week ago
0
reply
emmamaymurphy
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#40
Report 1 week ago
#40
I can’t seem to find this on their website? Could you send the link please? Many thanks
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,886

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Dundee
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Mon, 26 Aug '19
  • University of Aberdeen
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Tue, 27 Aug '19
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate (MA) Open Day Postgraduate
    Sat, 31 Aug '19

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (216)
12.39%
Excited (161)
9.23%
Worried (308)
17.66%
Terrified (385)
22.08%
Meh (180)
10.32%
Confused (37)
2.12%
Putting on a brave face (242)
13.88%
Impatient (215)
12.33%

Watched Threads

View All