Hands free mobile phones to be banned for drivers? Watch

Andrew97
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-49320473

The commons select committee have said it poses the same risk as being the legal limit for alcohol behind the wheel.

What do we think of this? Good idea, or draconian?
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the beer
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Same risk as something thats legal? hmm, might as well ditch the hands free kits then, how's it compare to GPS, radio or children?
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Napp
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Probably overstating the risk somewhat unless they think all chatting in a car is akin to being pissed...
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Andrew97)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-49320473

The commons select committee have said it poses the same risk as being the legal limit for alcohol behind the wheel.

What do we think of this? Good idea, or draconian?
I see this is as risky as driving at the legal blood alcohol limit. Is it as risky as driving at the speed limit or driving with the legal limit of tyre tread?

In other words, this seems to be something that carries an acceptable risk.
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ThomH97
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While I don't think people need to be using their phones while driving (that includes the guy who drives 'hundreds of miles each day' but doesn't like the idea of taking breaks), the reasoning given is very weak. There is no study mentioned to back up the single anonymous 'expert' who said there is 'essentially the same' amount of distraction as being at the legal blood alcohol limit, and to claim that drivers visualise things they are hearing also applies to passenger conversations and the radio. They've also not separated out hands-free and hands-on phone usage in the 773 crashes they mention. Hypothetically, if 772 of those crashes were with hands-on phones, and the only hands-free crash is the anecdotal one involving Seth Husband (RIP), then that would be pretty strong evidence for hands-free phones being safer, depending on the overall number of drivers using hands-free and hands-on phones. As before, this is very weak evidence to argue for a ban with, and that they haven't separated hands-free from hands-on where it would be very easy to do suggests they are trying to hide something in the data. Bad statistics.

This is at the same time that we have adverts designed to distract your attention from driving, placed everywhere at the side of the road. Get rid of those if you're serious, nobody should be reading an advert, deciding whether they'd like the product and then memorising the phone number/website address while driving.
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scorpion95
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I think it is a bit of a joke to be honest and it is totally un-policeable. It isn't any more distracting than having a passenger in the car or kids which you will generally glance at while talking etc. The sat nav or radio with changing thinks on that. How can anyone tell you are using hands free when new cars come with the feature in, you could be talking or singing along to the radio or even talking to yourself. How are the police supposed to judge and how many times do they have to pull people over to catch someone using hands free phone.
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