Gordon Brown: Good or Bad PM? Watch

mfm89
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#41
Report 11 years ago
#41
He would have been good about 10 years ago.
0
reply
Seven_Three
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#42
Report 11 years ago
#42
Tbh Gordon Brown reminds me of Mr.Bean.
0
reply
Axiom
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#43
Report 11 years ago
#43
(Original post by Arminius)
In what way? Its got newer trains but its much more expensive than BR was. The poor performance of BR is more to do with the politicians than failures of nationalisation per se imo.

nobody complains about the national motorway network, all done by the state, owned by the state. I believe the infrastructure should be owned by the state.
A number of reasons. Newer trains (and more of them,) more investment full stop, an increase in safety, punctuality and in passenger numbers. Yes, it is pretty expensive, but it's necessary on account of the decades of underinvestment in the railway network. There's no doubt that rail privatization could have been handled better, but that was more to do with the Major government rather than any innate flaws of privatization.

Looking at BR from a relatively objective viewpoint, it seems to have been an awful company in most factors. People might complain about the level of subsidy our network currently requires, but many of BR's decisions didn't exactly make economic sense either; replacing almost-new steam locomotives with diesels that didn't work, or building lots of non-standard railbus designs when a single, well-thought design might have saved many branch lines from the Beeching Axe.
0
reply
tetters
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#44
Report 11 years ago
#44
his heart is in the right place but he just isnt up to the job, better as Chancellor
0
reply
Otley
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#45
Report 11 years ago
#45
(Original post by Axiom)
A number of reasons. Newer trains (and more of them,) more investment full stop, an increase in safety, punctuality and in passenger numbers. Yes, it is pretty expensive, but it's necessary on account of the decades of underinvestment in the railway network. There's no doubt that rail privatization could have been handled better, but that was more to do with the Major government rather than any innate flaws of privatization.

Looking at BR from a relatively objective viewpoint, it seems to have been an awful company in most factors. People might complain about the level of subsidy our network currently requires, but many of BR's decisions didn't exactly make economic sense either; replacing almost-new steam locomotives with diesels that didn't work, or building lots of non-standard railbus designs when a single, well-thought design might have saved many branch lines from the Beeching Axe.
If you speak to many railway workers you will find that they completely disagree. Anyway, the official investigation into Hatfield found that privatisation was part of the problem. The general consensus is that safety both in terms of passengers (ie track maintainance) and health & safety for railways workers have declined.
0
reply
Cognito
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#46
Report 11 years ago
#46
Strong leader, clear thinker. Suffers at the hands of the press because any fourth term party is going to come under sustained criticism. Brown's greatest weakness is sometimes being overeliant on general trends in popular thought, he should focus more on his values, rather than those lorded over by the Murdoch press.
History will judge him as a victim of circumstance, not an incompetent PM.
0
reply
TheTourist
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#47
Report 11 years ago
#47
I think people tend to forget the work he done as Chancellor, He clearly knows his stuff, but I think the current global economic situation has made it seem like everything is his fault.. fuel prices etc, but really if the Tories were in power it wouldnt be MUCH different, ok maybe cameron is better to look at, but the guy hsas no experience whatsoever in the nitty gritty of Politics, hes a PR man & it shows to be honest..
0
reply
mendelssohn
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#48
Report 11 years ago
#48
(Original post by TheTourist)
I think people tend to forget the work he done as Chancellor
you mean riding the global wave of economic growth, and taking credit for it. Now things go wrong, its not his fault apparently...
0
reply
TheTourist
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#49
Report 11 years ago
#49
what do you want Brown to do exactly? i just don't get the fickleness man
0
reply
Cognito
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#50
Report 11 years ago
#50
(Original post by mendelssohn)
you mean riding the global wave of economic growth, and taking credit for it. Now things go wrong, its not his fault apparently...
This argument is oversimplistic. Every chancellor is hostage to the fortunes of the global economy to a large extent but can also implement there own policies by which we can judge them. Brown was a strong chancellor in times of growth and has (as de facto chancellor since last summer) kept Britain clear of the worst ramifications of the 'credit crunch' and soaring oil and food prices. Unemployment and inflation are still very low, it takes a sound economic brain to achieve that in times of global turbulance.
0
reply
mendelssohn
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#51
Report 11 years ago
#51
(Original post by TheTourist)
i just don't get the fickleness man
what does this even mean?

Gordon Brown was perfectly willing to take full credit for the success of the economy when in fact we were just riding the wave of a global economic boom, and he had nothing to do with the success. Now we are having trouble, he has distanced himself, absolving himself from responsibility.

He cant have it both ways. He is also a coward, as evidenced by many political moves, including blocking Dannat.
0
reply
mendelssohn
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#52
Report 11 years ago
#52
(Original post by Cognito)
Brown was a strong chancellor in times of growth and has (as de facto chancellor since last summer) kept Britain clear of the worst ramifications of the 'credit crunch' and soaring oil and food prices.
How exactly has he kept us clear? with solid examples?

Unemployment and inflation are still very low, it takes a sound economic brain to achieve that in times of global turbulance.
Inflation low? are you mad? maybe according to Brown's heavily massaged official figures. stagflation is knocking on the door.
0
reply
TheTourist
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#53
Report 11 years ago
#53
(Original post by mendelssohn)
what does this even mean?

Gordon Brown was perfectly willing to take full credit for the success of the economy when in fact we were just riding the wave of a global economic boom, and he had nothing to do with the success. Now we are having trouble, he has distanced himself, absolving himself from responsibility.

He cant have it both ways. He is also a coward, as evidenced by many political moves, including blocking Dannat.

Of course he's going to take credit for the economic boom of the 1990s he would be stupid not to! so what you just ride the global economic wave & let circumstsances beyond you're control dictate whether or not your competent? There's something called economic management involved
0
reply
Otley
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#54
Report 11 years ago
#54
I think it's unfair to blame Brown for the global problems. Global worming isn't his fault. Oil reserves aren't his fault. But h took credit for an economic boom that was not really his making, and he wasn't cautious enough when it came to borrowing. But that's monetarism for you.
0
reply
mendelssohn
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#55
Report 11 years ago
#55
(Original post by Otley)
I think it's unfair to blame Brown for the global problems. Global worming isn't his fault. Oil reserves aren't his fault. But h took credit for an economic boom that was not really his making, and he wasn't cautious enough when it came to borrowing. But that's monetarism for you.
Im not saying that we should blame brown for economic problems now. What I am saying is that equally, he doesn't get to take credit for the successes of the past few years, because they were down to global economic conditions in exactly the same way.
0
reply
Otley
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#56
Report 11 years ago
#56
(Original post by mendelssohn)
Im not saying that we should blame brown for economic problems now. What I am saying is that equally, he doesn't get to take credit for the successes of the past few years, because they were down to global economic conditions in exactly the same way.
Oh I agree. I've been of the opinion for a long time that borrowing was a major flaw in the economy, and that in the longer term energy was going to be a major crisis. I think ultimately things are going to get a lot worse. They might pick up over the next few years after the lending market picks up and oil prices drop (they have to!!), but in the long run oil is going to be a major problem.
0
reply
Mr Barry Bonds
Badges: 0
#57
Report 11 years ago
#57
"Bad" really doesn't do him justice.
0
reply
jonskibeat
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#58
Report 10 years ago
#58
Thought it might be fun to revisit this thread, see how things have come along..

(Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
(Original post by Touche)
"no more boom and bust"
He has succeeded. The Tories when in managed 15% inflation on numerous occasions, along with the ERM disaster.
Yeah...how's that working out now, coming up to 10 months later?

(Original post by helraizer)
Gordon Brown doesn't seem to have any presence about him. Kernel Sanders has more.
Weebl to the cause!
http://www.weebls-stuff.com/toons/Gordon/

Can I interest any of you good people of "the left" in a book?
Why the Real Estate Boom Will Not Bust - And How You Can Profit from It: How to Build Wealth in Today's Expanding Real Estate Market
0
reply
Hopping Mad Kangaroo
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#59
Report 10 years ago
#59
(Original post by digitaltoast)
Thought it might be fun to revisit this thread, see how things have come along..

Yeah...how's that working out now, coming up to 10 months later?
Doing rather well, inflation is far away from the double figures...
0
reply
jonskibeat
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#60
Report 10 years ago
#60
(Original post by Hopping Mad Kangaroo)
Doing rather well, inflation is far away from the double figures...
I decided to have a good look around.
The only mention of 15% in the 80s is for interest rates. For example:
http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/press_92_08.htm
First, here's that key figure
In the 1990s, interest rates hit 15 per cent;
There's more on that page...
In the 1970s inflation hit almost 25 per cent,
That'll be Labour...
In the 1980s, over 3 million on the dole,
They're working towards that target: http://www.hrmguide.co.uk/jobmarket/unemployment.htm
The unemployment rate rose to 6.5% - up 0.5% over the quarter and 1.3% on last year. The number of people employed is down by 75,000 on the last year.

Either way, it's not doing them much good:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...the-price.html
The Marketing Sciences survey for The Sunday Telegraph puts Labour's support at just 26 per cent, with the Tories 17 points ahead on 43 per cent and heading for a Commons majority of 120.
Labour's support has slumped alarmingly in the wake of the scandal which saw the Prime Minister's former key adviser, Damian McBride, resign after it emerged he had sent emails from 10 Downing Street suggesting smears against leading Conservatives.

Other findings in the new poll suggest Mr Brown's government is now seen by voters as more likely to resort to "spin" and dirty tricks than Mr Blair's, despite the Prime Minister's pledge to clean up politics when he came to power in July 2007.
Mr McBride's concern over Mr Brown's fate appears to be well placed, with the Liberal Democrats, on 21 per cent, just five points behind Labour in today's poll. To add to Labour's woes, 17 per cent of those who voted for the party in the 2005 general election now say they support the Conservatives, a high proportion of direct "switchers".
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Why wouldn't you turn to teachers if you were being bullied?

They might tell my parents (23)
6.74%
They might tell the bully (33)
9.68%
I don't think they'd understand (52)
15.25%
It might lead to more bullying (131)
38.42%
There's nothing they could do (102)
29.91%

Watched Threads

View All