Silvertongue
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#41
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Oh ok thank goodness!! I was getting so freaked out. Certain chapters were really straightforward and easy to understand but others, mainly the application of the law to certain cases just completely baffled me. I was planning on re-reading loads of times anyway so thanks!

Also, how well do they expect people to know the books they've read in general? Do they pretty much give you free reign to talk about whichever parts interested you or do they grill you to test that you've actually read it and understood it?
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jacketpotato
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#42
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I believe its only Oxbridge who interview you. You'd be unlikely to be grilled on the books; though you would get asked what interested you about them if you just name-dropped them in your PS. You would however probably get grilled on specific issues you raised in your statement. This is another major benefit of talking about a particular legal issue or something you were particularly interested by in the books for potential Oxbridgonians: it provides a really impressive talking point at interview that you can prepare well for.
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sleekchic
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#43
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I've just found this on itunes although I'm guessing a lot of people probably know about it already and I think it'll be helpful for would be applicants as well as present law students.

It's a set of podcasts with different legal issues/areas and they are:

Law Express
The Law Reports

If anyone knows of anymore then do say.
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jacketpotato
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#44
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Alastair Hudson's website (google it) has excellent podcasts on Trusts and Company law.
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helz_91
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#45
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Thank you!
This has been a very useful thread indeed
xxx
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chigz32
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#46
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Is it worth reading legal books in summer?
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sleekchic
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#47
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(Original post by chigz32)
Is it worth reading legal books in summer?
Well I'd imagine it depends on you. I'm most likely starting in September and I'm reading some "Introduction to" books for some modules.

Have you been giving a reading list or something?
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chigz32
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#48
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(Original post by sleekchic)
Well I'd imagine it depends on you. I'm most likely starting in September and I'm reading some "Introduction to" books for some modules.

Have you been giving a reading list or something?
Yeahh im reading some Intro books, not got a reading list. I'm just thinking if its usefull, cuz im not making notes, just reading :P
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jacketpotato
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#49
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They won't be directly useful in terms of knowledge; but they are useful in introducing you to the way law works and legal thinking. I recommend the Clarendon "Introduction to..." series (orange covers) as they give you a birds-eye overview of a topic, helping you to see the big picture - something easily lost at uni until it gets too close to the exams. There is an "Introduction to Constitutional law" which is a good bet.
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Ape Gone Insane
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#50
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Anybody here ever got a First Class honor in Law? How hard is it?

I mean, can it be achieved through sheer hard work or do you have to have the "x factor" or that special flair. I'm talking about Law here as I know other subjects are either special flair or sometimes hard work.
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jacketpotato
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#51
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I missed out on a first by 2 marks in one subject :rant:

The most important thing is exam technique. If you don't have really super technique, forget it. They don't really teach technique, so most people's technique really sucks. Note the technique you need for problems/essays is different to at school, check the FAQ for advice. Good revision technique and a wee bit of hard work in exam time are needed also.
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Ape Gone Insane
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#52
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
I missed out on a first by 2 marks in one subject :rant:

The most important thing is exam technique. If you don't have really super technique, forget it. They don't really teach technique, so most people's technique really sucks. Note the technique you need for problems/essays is different to at school, check the FAQ for advice. Good revision technique and a wee bit of hard work in exam time are needed also.
Damn.

Anyways my essay writing isn't of a consistent high standard. Since you don't get taught it, is there any good books to help improve exam technique.....
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Dom1989
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#53
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Hello yeah same questions as above really - does anyone recommend books on how to answer problem or essay questions using the correct technique?
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jacketpotato
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#54
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I'm not aware of any books which are particularly good. Someone on these forums recommended a Q&A book for contract which gives you a bunch of sample model answers. A good idea certainly, but the Q&A books I've seen have been a bit naff. My advice would be to draw it out of your tutors in tutorials (i.e. ask "how would we approach a question on X"). Another good tip is to look at past papers and read examiners reports from the very start of the course. My guide to exam technique is in the FAQ in my sig.

At school, you are made to practice writing exam papers and so on many times before doing the exam. At uni, most people just read the stuff and don't bother to practice it. I'd advise making your final 2days revision for each subject (so 10days of this for 5subjects) practice/consolidation days where you practice planning and writing answers to exam questions. Practice makes perfect... and it also reveals gaps in your knowledge and gives you a chance to look stuff up before going into the exam room.
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emmings
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#55
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
I'd advise making your final 2days revision for each subject (so 10days of this for 5subjects) practice/consolidation days where you practice planning and writing answers to exam questions. Practice makes perfect... and it also reveals gaps in your knowledge and gives you a chance to look stuff up before going into the exam room.
Agreed. I got a first and exam technique is definitely a major factor. Whenever I read friends' essays the difference wasn't so much in knowledge but getting it down on the paper in a coherent, logical way that reads nicely.

I always devoted at least 2-3 days to doing past papers, as JP suggests. Initially I'd use my notes as much as I liked, and gradually move towards not using them at all.

My other advice would be to actually do essays throughout the year. At most universities (Oxbridge aside) essays will be set periodically throughout the year; I was at KCL where it was supposed to be 8 per term (2 for each module). But it's not like school and tutors won't hound you if you don't hand it in, they really won't care at all. The essays are for your benefit, to get that vital feedback on your technique. So make sure you do them.
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Hustler-1337
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#56
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Hi Guys,

I'm thinking of doing a law degree, and need to confirm that it's right for me. Please can someone advise me on the best book(s) avaiable for me to read which gives me an idea of what content I will study in a Law degree. Basically, I need a book which will show me the general jist of what law degree style is, and how deep it goes if you get what I mean. Also, need some books or something whic h shows how a law degree essay looks like and stuff.

I see that jacketpotato has recommended some, but which one is best for introduction to the newbie?

(Original post by jacketpotato)
9) What books can I read to give me a flavour of the law and something to talk about at interview?
Some examples include:
'Understanding Law' by Adams and Brownsword
'Letters to a Law Student' by McBride
'Learning the Law' by Williams
'Learning Legal Rules' by Holland
'The Law Machine' by Berlins and Dyer
'What About Law?' by Barnard, O'Sullivan and Virgo
'The Politics of the Judiciary' by Griffith
Please could someone help.Thanks.
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chigz32
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#57
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This thread shall be my Bible for the next 3 years.
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sleekchic
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#58
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(Original post by hmiah)
Hi Guys,

I'm thinking of doing a law degree, and need to confirm that it's right for me. Please can someone advise me on the best book(s) avaiable for me to read which gives me an idea of what content I will study in a Law degree. Basically, I need a book which will show me the general jist of what law degree style is, and how deep it goes if you get what I mean. Also, need some books or something whic h shows how a law degree essay looks like and stuff.

I see that jacketpotato has recommended some, but which one is best for introduction to the newbie?

Please could someone help.Thanks.
This is a bit late but I would recommed these two:

'Understanding Law' by Adams and Brownsword
'What About Law?' by Barnard, O'Sullivan and Virgo

Although I don't see how books which show you what a law essay looks like will help you decide but maybe that's just me.
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Rosyred809
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#59
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excellent..advice
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eVeNtInE
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#60
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Great thread, cheers.

Was wondering if it's bad that I'm finding 'Understanding Law' heavy and hard to understand to begin with?
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