Should I study medicine Watch

Anonymous #1
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I think I will find the course interesting, the job is well paid and stable, and part time opportunities are quite good. But I worry about the responsibility of the job mainly, and the fact you often have to relocate and work nights. I don't mind doing this in my 20s but I don't know how I would manage if I had children to look after. I could imagine myself having to change careers to work around family life.

Should I just choose an easier path for myself from the start? If you have any examples for what I should study then please let me know. My A levels are Biology, Chemistry, Maths.

What other degrees and careers are good options for me plz?
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think I will find the course interesting, the job is well paid and stable, and part time opportunities are quite good. But I worry about the responsibility of the job mainly, and the fact you often have to relocate and work nights. I don't mind doing this in my 20s but I don't know how I would manage if I had children to look after. I could imagine myself having to change careers to work around family life.

Should I just choose an easier path for myself from the start? If you have any examples for what I should study then please let me know. My A levels are Biology, Chemistry, Maths.

What other degrees and careers are good options for me plz?
Hey,
I’m in the same position as you. I have an offer to do medicine next year but I’m wondering if it’s the right course for me because of the sheer commitment it requires. Personally if you’re more interested in the patient interaction then the science then I would recommend pursuing medicine if not then just choose a scientific degree like biochemistry and you can become a healthcare assistant in the NHS.

Hope it helps
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Laycity
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think I will find the course interesting, the job is well paid and stable, and part time opportunities are quite good. But I worry about the responsibility of the job mainly, and the fact you often have to relocate and work nights. I don't mind doing this in my 20s but I don't know how I would manage if I had children to look after. I could imagine myself having to change careers to work around family life.

Should I just choose an easier path for myself from the start? If you have any examples for what I should study then please let me know. My A levels are Biology, Chemistry, Maths.

What other degrees and careers are good options for me plz?
Have you done any health or care related work experience? This will give you a flavour of what's involved and help decide whether it's for you or not.
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Anonymous #3
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Medicine if you love it to its absolute core. Dentistry if you want a surgical and more organised life, as you're self-employed. Both are extremely well paid is money shouldn't be taken into account. Both are also in very high demand so you'll get a job instantly.

Consider Dent (~2nd Yr Dent student 😜)
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey,
I’m in the same position as you. I have an offer to do medicine next year but I’m wondering if it’s the right course for me because of the sheer commitment it requires. Personally if you’re more interested in the patient interaction then the science then I would recommend pursuing medicine if not then just choose a scientific degree like biochemistry and you can become a healthcare assistant in the NHS.

Hope it helps
Thank you. I should be starting in September too. If you weren't anon I'd send u a DM.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Laycity)
Have you done any health or care related work experience? This will give you a flavour of what's involved and help decide whether it's for you or not.
Yes i've done a fair bit. I liked it and found it interesting but got mixed messages from the doctors. some seemed to love their jobs and others didn't. I find what they do very interesting, I got to see some surgery and stuff like that. but what is most important to me is if they like their jobs. I also worry I wouldn't know what to do with a patient. Sometimes I'll hear someone going to the doctor with a scratch on their eye, or an addiction to something and i feel like if I was the doctor I'd have no idea what to do in that situation and people are relying on you. I'd have no idea where to start with it.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Medicine if you love it to its absolute core. Dentistry if you want a surgical and more organised life, as you're self-employed. Both are extremely well paid is money shouldn't be taken into account. Both are also in very high demand so you'll get a job instantly.

Consider Dent (~2nd Yr Dent student 😜)
Dentistry does always sound nice tbf. But I couldn't deal with the manual dexterity of it.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think I will find the course interesting, the job is well paid and stable, and part time opportunities are quite good. But I worry about the responsibility of the job mainly, and the fact you often have to relocate and work nights. I don't mind doing this in my 20s but I don't know how I would manage if I had children to look after. I could imagine myself having to change careers to work around family life.
Do you realise that as a consultant you don't need to move round unless you wanted to?

Even as a registrar you'd only move around a relatively small area once a year.

Some specialty you don't have to do nights.

Should I just choose an easier path for myself from the start? If you have any examples for what I should study then please let me know. My A levels are Biology, Chemistry, Maths.

What other degrees and careers are good options for me plz?
Have a look at Physicians Associate too.
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thisisatrek
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(Original post by ecolier)
Do you realise that as a consultant you don't need to move round unless you wanted to?

Even as a registrar you'd only move around a relatively small area once a year.

Some specialty you don't have to do nights.


Have a look at Physicians Associate too.
As much as this is true, you have to also consider the fact that you shouldn’t necessarily be going into a career which you won’t enjoy from the get go, by that I mean it takes 10+ years to become a consultant so if you only want the job of a consultant then you’ll likely just lose motivation throughout the journey.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by thisisatrek)
As much as this is true, you have to also consider the fact that you shouldn’t necessarily be going into a career which you won’t enjoy from the get go, by that I mean it takes 10+ years to become a consultant so if you only want the job of a consultant then you’ll likely just lose motivation throughout the journey.
I'm finding it hard to know whether i will enjoy it. It will be 5 year before i'm a doctor, i'll be 25 and hopefully more mature and my interests may have changed or I may be even more passionate about medicine. That is why I am struggling to know whether to let go of this offer I have and go for an easier career in finance/ business or stick to medicine, which I would probably find more interesting in the short term but may be so exhausting and unsustainable in the long term.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ecolier)
Do you realise that as a consultant you don't need to move round unless you wanted to?

Even as a registrar you'd only move around a relatively small area once a year.

Some specialty you don't have to do nights.


Have a look at Physicians Associate too.
Thanks. I do understand you can potentially have a relatively relaxed life as a doctor. It depends what path you choose. At my GP work experience the GP said they are hiring a new GP who will only be working 1.5 days a week but will be on 40K (I don't know whether this is accurate or not or whether she got her figures wrong). It's also easier to go part time as a doctor compared to if you're working in the city and on a high salary. They don't really want a manager of a company who can only work 2 days a week. So maybe it will may off in the long run, I just don't know.
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ecolier
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(Original post by thisisatrek)
As much as this is true, you have to also consider the fact that you shouldn’t necessarily be going into a career which you won’t enjoy from the get go,
Absolutely. It is a good start to ask on this forum. The beauty of medicine is that there is usually a specialty for everyone - from office based, to surgery, to outdoor, to home visits, to sports medicine etc. etc.

by that I mean it takes 10+ years to become a consultant so if you only want the job of a consultant then you’ll likely just lose motivation throughout the journey.
Again, yes. But then training to become a consultant is a step-wise thing, there are many steps in the middle so you don't enter medical school and end up as a paediatric cardiologist after 15 years. You go in, after 5 years you become a general foundation doctor, then you apply to a core training programme (or take a gap year or two to decide what you want to do!), then you apply to a specialty training programme again.

At all stages you can leave the training programme and retrain in another specialty.

(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks. I do understand you can potentially have a relatively relaxed life as a doctor. It depends what path you choose. At my GP work experience the GP said they are hiring a new GP who will only be working 1.5 days a week but will be on 40K (I don't know whether this is accurate or not or whether she got her figures wrong). It's also easier to go part time as a doctor compared to if you're working in the city and on a high salary. They don't really want a manager of a company who can only work 2 days a week. So maybe it will may off in the long run, I just don't know.
Remember, if you want a high salary (purely) then Medicine is not for you...

As I said, please also consider Physician Associates.
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Ivan_Andru
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Hey pal, I’m doing biomedicine now at UCL because I couldn’t decide if medicine was the right fit for me. I’m so happy I did, there are so many opportunities coming out of biomed—it is insane! The curriculum is fairly similar to medicine and in 3 years you can have a specialization in neuroscience, biomedical sciences, pharmacology, etc...

If you want to study medicine but are not 100% sure, choose biomedicine, there are a lot of open doors after you finish your degree. For example, you can study graduate entry medicine at Oxbridge, Imperial, etc... Or you can apply to other countries like the U.S where medicine is ONLY graduate.

Hope this helps you decide!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ecolier)
Absolutely. It is a good start to ask on this forum. The beauty of medicine is that there is usually a specialty for everyone - from office based, to surgery, to outdoor, to home visits, to sports medicine etc. etc.


Again, yes. But then training to become a consultant is a step-wise thing, there are many steps in the middle so you don't enter medical school and end up as a paediatric cardiologist after 15 years. You go in, after 5 years you become a general foundation doctor, then you apply to a core training programme (or take a gap year or two to decide what you want to do!), then you apply to a specialty training programme again.

At all stages you can leave the training programme and retrain in another specialty.



Remember, if you want a high salary (purely) then Medicine is not for you...

As I said, please also consider Physician Associates.
Thank you, I'll look into physician associates.
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Dentistry does always sound nice tbf. But I couldn't deal with the manual dexterity of it.
The manual dexterity is practiced rigorously. It's a 5 year course because by the end you're a fully functional dentist who is capable of working alone with all the responsibilities.
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Anonymous #3
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May I ask what you got for your GCSE?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
May I ask what you got for your GCSE?
all A*s and then A*A*A at A level.
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Swansea University Enquiries
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think I will find the course interesting, the job is well paid and stable, and part time opportunities are quite good. But I worry about the responsibility of the job mainly, and the fact you often have to relocate and work nights. I don't mind doing this in my 20s but I don't know how I would manage if I had children to look after. I could imagine myself having to change careers to work around family life.

Should I just choose an easier path for myself from the start? If you have any examples for what I should study then please let me know. My A levels are Biology, Chemistry, Maths.

What other degrees and careers are good options for me plz?
Hi there, I'm a final year medical student at Swansea. This is such an important question and one that everyone who's applied to medicine has faced at some point (and if I'm honest, I've asked myself this even after starting medical school). It is so important to consider these things when you're looking at what career you want for yourself in the future, but my advice is not to hold back from pursuing medicine if you feel that it will provide you with a rewarding and passionate career. In my 4 years of studying (plus work experience) I've met quite a few doctors who have experienced the demands of working in medicine; including the tough hours and relocation that you've mentioned in your OP; I've found that while doctors might mumble and grumble about the nitty gritty of the job, the overwhelming feeling towards medicine is one of obsessive fascination and satisfaction.
Cheesy speeches aside, if you're still not sure of whether medicine is right for you another option might be to do a biomedical science degree with a pathway to medicine. This will give you another 3 years to get more experience in the medical/science field and see where you might fit in the expanding field of medicine and medical science. I followed this path myself by studying Medical Biochemistry at Swansea, and I found that it gave me a great opportunity to expand my knowledge and develop myself before taking on the challenge of studying graduate-entry medicine. The postgraduate course is condensed to 4 years (instead of the normal 5) so it doesn't take that much longer than the undergrad course overall and gives you more time to consider where you would like your future to take you.

I hope that this helps, all the best for your future whatever you decide to do.
Alex Ruddy (4th year Medical student)
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Schoolboy101
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm finding it hard to know whether i will enjoy it. It will be 5 year before i'm a doctor, i'll be 25 and hopefully more mature and my interests may have changed or I may be even more passionate about medicine. That is why I am struggling to know whether to let go of this offer I have and go for an easier career in finance/ business or stick to medicine, which I would probably find more interesting in the short term but may be so exhausting and unsustainable in the long term.
A career in finance isn't necessarily easier rather it some cases it could be as difficult as a career in medicine. This is due to high competition to not only get a job but also when your at the job in order to get a promotion that in return will of course require long hours and commitment likewise with medicine
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Swansea University Enquiries)
Hi there, I'm a final year medical student at Swansea. This is such an important question and one that everyone who's applied to medicine has faced at some point (and if I'm honest, I've asked myself this even after starting medical school). It is so important to consider these things when you're looking at what career you want for yourself in the future, but my advice is not to hold back from pursuing medicine if you feel that it will provide you with a rewarding and passionate career. In my 4 years of studying (plus work experience) I've met quite a few doctors who have experienced the demands of working in medicine; including the tough hours and relocation that you've mentioned in your OP; I've found that while doctors might mumble and grumble about the nitty gritty of the job, the overwhelming feeling towards medicine is one of obsessive fascination and satisfaction.
Cheesy speeches aside, if you're still not sure of whether medicine is right for you another option might be to do a biomedical science degree with a pathway to medicine. This will give you another 3 years to get more experience in the medical/science field and see where you might fit in the expanding field of medicine and medical science. I followed this path myself by studying Medical Biochemistry at Swansea, and I found that it gave me a great opportunity to expand my knowledge and develop myself before taking on the challenge of studying graduate-entry medicine. The postgraduate course is condensed to 4 years (instead of the normal 5) so it doesn't take that much longer than the undergrad course overall and gives you more time to consider where you would like your future to take you.

I hope that this helps, all the best for your future whatever you decide to do.
Alex Ruddy (4th year Medical student)
Hi,

thank you for replying.

I have thought about doing GEM but it's even more competitive, so I kind of think now or never- seeing as I already have a place at med school.
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