PTSD Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 5 days ago
#1
Does anyone know how PTSD is defined?

I have always had anxiety, but it seems to be very bad and getting worse following a traumatic incident approximately 18 months ago. But I don't know if it is just another manifestation of my anxiety, or if this is actually PTSD?

Anyone with knowledge/experience, I appreciate your thoughts and/or advise...
0
reply
olivia.francesca
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 days ago
#2
Ptsd is a branch of anxiety
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
pcdc405
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 days ago
#3
There are obviously defined definitions and to have PTSD or PTS can and should and only be diagnosed by a professional. Please don't get caught up in the definition. If you haven't sought help already I urge you to do it. Most important I find is to slow yourself down, take good deep breaths. You should try and reassure yourself by pulling apart what makes you anxious and look for the evidence to disprove what your thinking. I've dealt with so many people with different mental health issues and I've gone through it to, still do. Just know, you're not alone, there is help which will be right for you just persevere. And just talk to someone you trust. You will get there.
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#4
Report Thread starter 4 days ago
#4
(Original post by pcdc405)
There are obviously defined definitions and to have PTSD or PTS can and should and only be diagnosed by a professional. Please don't get caught up in the definition. If you haven't sought help already I urge you to do it. Most important I find is to slow yourself down, take good deep breaths. You should try and reassure yourself by pulling apart what makes you anxious and look for the evidence to disprove what your thinking. I've dealt with so many people with different mental health issues and I've gone through it to, still do. Just know, you're not alone, there is help which will be right for you just persevere. And just talk to someone you trust. You will get there.
Thank you!
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 3 days ago
#5
Anyone been diagnosed with PTSD by a medical professional? How do they diagnose you?
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
SlS66
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 days ago
#6
Self diagnosis won't help you. You need to see the go who will refer you to mental health services. Then you'll go for an assessment to establish what sort if support both medical (psychiatry)and cognitive (psychology). Depending on your needs and diagnosis, they may give you medication and arrange therapy. You'll have to be patient as waiting lists can long but please try and hang in there. Don't feel ashamed of reaching out for services either, lots of people need this support during their lifetime. Recognising there's a problem is a positive so make the first steps and ask a professional. All the best.
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 days ago
#7
I've been diagnosed with complex PTSD by a psychiatrist (and some other mental health issues, one of which being Enduring Personality Change after Catastrophic Experiences - don't ask me why this and CPTSD is in my diagnosis list, I don't actually know the difference). We just talked about my symptoms and a brief (like, very brief) outline of various traumas I've been through, although some I couldn't verbalise because of one reason or another (they're quite good at figuring stuff out, which is quite stressful though, I will say, some of their reading between the lines has sent me into panic attacks and flashbacks).

Do you have specific questions?
Last edited by Pathway; 3 days ago
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#8
Report 3 days ago
#8
I’ve been diagnosed with PTSD so I am happy to answer any questions you have. We also just talked about my symptoms, how often they happen, how long they’ve been happening for and what impact they are having upon my life. Of course anxiety is a BIG part of PTSD, but there is still so much more to it as I think it is quite a complex illness
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 days ago
#9
The DSM-V full notes are actually quite lengthy and too long to quote in one post.

I meet quite a few people with PTSD - caused by violence, sexual assault, abuse, from childbirth, car accidents. There is actually a lot of similarity between other anxiety disorders. When you get a room full of people together you can't 'tell the difference' straight away between those with PTSD and those with other anxiety conditions. A lot of people would probably say to that yes you can don't be silly they are very different.

A lot of people tell me they wait a long time to get diagnoses. A number of people have said they feel mental health services are 'reluctant' to put PTSD down as a diagnosis. This is something I have seen online too. On the other side I have talked to people in mental health who have privately said they feel PTSD and OCD spectrum are the hardest and most complex anxiety disorders to treat and they find it difficult to tell them apart from two other conditions.

Go and see the doctor OP. Try to access services, but there may be specialist voluntary services you don't know about e.g. ones that deal with domestic violence or sexual assault that you could also access if applicable.
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 days ago
#10
(Original post by marinade)
The DSM-V full notes are actually quite lengthy and too long to quote in one post.

I meet quite a few people with PTSD - caused by violence, sexual assault, abuse, from childbirth, car accidents. There is actually a lot of similarity between other anxiety disorders. When you get a room full of people together you can't 'tell the difference' straight away between those with PTSD and those with other anxiety conditions. A lot of people would probably say to that yes you can don't be silly they are very different.

A lot of people tell me they wait a long time to get diagnoses. A number of people have said they feel mental health services are 'reluctant' to put PTSD down as a diagnosis. This is something I have seen online too. On the other side I have talked to people in mental health who have privately said they feel PTSD and OCD spectrum are the hardest and most complex anxiety disorders to treat and they find it difficult to tell them apart from two other conditions.

Go and see the doctor OP. Try to access services, but there may be specialist voluntary services you don't know about e.g. ones that deal with domestic violence or sexual assault that you could also access if applicable.
This is interesting, if I've understood it correctly. Why are they hard to tell apart? (from each other or what?)
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 days ago
#11
(Original post by Pathway)
This is interesting, if I've understood it correctly. Why are they hard to tell apart? (from each other or what?)
PTSD. Not differentiating OCD and PTSD although that can sometimes be an issue. Workers stress how varied and complex both are.

PTSD. Comorbidity with depression and other things. Can get labelled as depression rather than both. I think the phrase the DSM uses is clinically 'varies', so some patients have a lot of B or C symptoms whereas others have D and E (you see this meeting people). Also a very, very tricky topic but difficulty distinguishing flashbacks from hallucinations and other things in some patients. Anger and addictions frequently get labelled as other separate things and unfortunately support just isn't there so can go on a long time. Just some of the potential pitfalls. My understanding is other symptoms even more common to anxiety got ripped out of the diagnosis as it was moved into its own section of stress and trauma related disorders.

I will post later. I would rather quote specific bits on symptoms from the DSM and then explain my experiences of meeting people in vague general terms with those symptoms and what mental health workers have said.
Last edited by marinade; 3 days ago
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 days ago
#12
(Original post by marinade)
Comorbidity with depression and other things. Can get labelled as depression rather than both. I think the phrase the DSM uses is clinically 'varies', so some patients have a lot of B or C symptoms whereas others have D and E (you see this meeting people). Also a very, very tricky topic but difficulty distinguishing flashbacks from hallucinations and other things in some patients. Anger and addictions frequently get labelled as other separate things and unfortunately support just isn't there so can go on a long time. Just some of the potential pitfalls. My understanding is other symptoms even more common to anxiety got ripped out of the diagnosis as it was moved into its own section of stress and trauma related disorders.

I will post later. I would rather quote specific bits on symptoms from the DSM and then explain my experiences of meeting people in vague general terms with those symptoms and what mental health workers have said.
That would be interesting to hear. I've had some things explained to me from a DSM perspective at the old specialist trauma team I was under when I was at university, but now they seem to be using the ICD at my current MH team for some reason. I think trauma is just really pervasive, so it can look like a lot of things, at least that's what I've seen and read about.
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 days ago
#13
(Original post by Pathway)
That would be interesting to hear. I've had some things explained to me from a DSM perspective at the old specialist trauma team I was under when I was at university, but now they seem to be using the ICD at my current MH team for some reason. I think trauma is just really pervasive, so it can look like a lot of things, at least that's what I've seen and read about.
I don't know so much about the ICD and the 11 is coming out soon. stress and trauma definitely pervasive.

B and C criteria symptoms from the DSD-V

B. Presence of one (or more) of the following intrusion symptoms associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred:

1. Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the traumatic event(s).

2. Recurrent distressing dreams in which the content and/or affect of the dream are related to the traumatic event(s).

3. Dissociative reactions (e.g., flashbacks) in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event(s) were recurring. (Such reactions may occur on a continuum, with the most extreme expression being a complete loss of awareness of present surroundings.)

4. Intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).

5. Marked physiological reactions to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).

C. Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by one or both of the following:

1. Avoidance of or efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).

2. Avoidance of or efforts to avoid external reminders (people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations) that arouse distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).
and this is what the guidance says


The traumatic event can be reexperienced in various ways. Commonly, the individual has recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive recollections of the event (Criterion B1). Intrusive recollections in PTSD are distinguished from depressive rumination in that they apply only to involuntary and intrusive distressing memories. The emphasis is on recurrent memories of the event that usually include sensory, emotional, or physiological behavioral components. A common reexperiencing symptom is distressing dreams that replay the event itself or that are representative or thematically related to the major threats involved in the traumatic event (Criterion B2). The individual may experience dissociative states that last from a few seconds to several hours or even days, during which components of the event are relived and the individual behaves as if the event were occurring at that moment (Criterion B3). Such events occur on a continuum from brief visual or other sensory intrusions about part of the traumatic event without loss of reality orientation, to complete loss of awareness of present surroundings. These episodes, often referred to as “flashbacks,” are typically brief but can be associated with prolonged distress and heightened arousal... Intense psychological distress (Criterion B4) or physiological reactivity (Criterion B5) often occurs when the individual is exposed to triggering events that resemble or symbolize an aspect of the traumatic event (e.g., windy days after a hurricane; seeing someone who resembles one’s perpetrator). The triggering cue could be a physical sensation (e.g., dizziness for survivors of head trauma; rapid heartbeat for a previously traumatized child), particularly for individuals with highly somatic presentations(Friedman et al. 2011). Stimuli associated with the trauma are persistently (e.g., always or almost always) avoided. The individual commonly makes deliberate efforts to avoid thoughts, memories, feelings, or talking about the traumatic event (e.g., utilizing distraction techniques to avoid internal reminders) (Criterion C1) and to avoid activities, objects, situations, or people who arouse recollections of it (Criterion C2).
Intrusive thoughts are covered below. For B3, I note that the DSM says itself it varies a lot. Shorter experiences I have heard I can certainly see why that might be mixed up with other anxiety conditions and this is something mental health people have said. There's a descriptive problem and one of labelling of symptoms. B5 I find interesting as somatic triggers are grossly under-talked about in anxiety in general.

In terms of OCD in the PTSD guidance notes it says

In OCD, there are recurrent intrusive thoughts, but these meet the definition of an obsession. In addition, the intrusive thoughts are not related to an experienced traumatic event, compulsions are usually present, and other symptoms of PTSD or acute stress disorder are typically absent.
Some of the OCD intrusive thoughts I have heard people say are 'similar' in nature shall we say to some people with PTSD.

D and E symptoms


D. Negative alterations in cognitions and mood associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by two (or more) of the following:

1. Inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic event(s) (typically due to dissociative amnesia and not to other factors such as head injury, alcohol, or drugs).

2. Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world (e.g., “I am bad,” “No one can be trusted,” “The world is completely dangerous,” “My whole nervous system is permanently ruined”).

3. Persistent, distorted cognitions about the cause or consequences of the traumatic event(s) that lead the individual to blame himself/herself or others.

4. Persistent negative emotional state (e.g., fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame).

5. Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities.

6. Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others.

7. Persistent inability to experience positive emotions (e.g., inability to experience happiness, satisfaction, or loving feelings).

E. Marked alterations in arousal and reactivity associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by two (or more) of the following:

Irritable behavior and angry outbursts (with little or no provocation) typically expressed as verbal or physical aggression toward people or objects.

Reckless or self-destructive behaviour.

Hypervigilance.

Exaggerated startle response.

Problems with concentration.

Sleep disturbance (e.g., difficulty falling or staying asleep or restless sleep).
This is an edited down version of the guidance says for cluster E summarising bits I have seen or think are underreported. Depersonalisation and derealisation which I don't have time to cover, but I believe there is a big issue of semantics and how people with anxiety conditions disclose/describe/label things of which there is interesting overlap.

Individuals with PTSD may be quick tempered and may even engage in aggressive verbal and/or physical behavior with little or no provocation (e.g., yelling at people, getting into fights, destroying objects) (Criterion E1). They may also engage in reckless or self-destructive behavior such as dangerous driving, excessive alcohol or drug use, or self-injurious or suicidal behavior (Criterion E2)… E4). Concentration difficulties, including difficulty remembering daily events (e.g., forgetting one’s telephone number) or attending to focused tasks (e.g., following a conversation for a sustained period of time), are commonly reported (Criterion E5). Problems with sleep onset and maintenance are common and may be associated with nightmares and safety concerns or with generalized elevated arousal that interferes with adequate sleep (Criterion E6). Some individuals also experience persistent dissociative symptoms of detachment from their bodies (depersonalization) or the world around them (derealization); this is reflected in the “with dissociative symptoms” specifier(Friedman et al. 2011).
I have met a lot of people ) self medicating, taking alcohol or prescription drugs not for the purpose intended along these lines. A lot of E symptoms in general, although I want to emphasize this isn't everyone with PTSD. I've seen plenty of people without E symptoms, or different ones and B,C,D and other.
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 days ago
#14
(Original post by marinade)
I don't know so much about the ICD and the 11 is coming out soon. stress and trauma definitely pervasive.

B and C criteria symptoms from the DSD-V



and this is what the guidance says



Intrusive thoughts are covered below. For B3, I note that the DSM says itself it varies a lot. Shorter experiences I have heard I can certainly see why that might be mixed up with other anxiety conditions and this is something mental health people have said. There's a descriptive problem and one of labelling of symptoms. B5 I find interesting as somatic triggers are grossly under-talked about in anxiety in general.

In terms of OCD in the PTSD guidance notes it says



Some of the OCD intrusive thoughts I have heard people say are 'similar' in nature shall we say to some people with PTSD.

D and E symptoms



This is an edited down version of the guidance says for cluster E summarising bits I have seen or think are underreported. Depersonalisation and derealisation which I don't have time to cover, but I believe there is a big issue of semantics and how people with anxiety conditions disclose/describe/label things of which there is interesting overlap.

I have met a lot of people ) self medicating, taking alcohol or prescription drugs not for the purpose intended along these lines. A lot of E symptoms in general, although I want to emphasize this isn't everyone with PTSD. I've seen plenty of people without E symptoms, or different ones and B,C,D and other.
Wow, thanks! I've not seen the DSMs criteria in this much detail before, the one I got shown was very brief lol. It's sorta quite astounding how many things it impacts. I haven't ever self-medicated with drugs or alcohol, guess my vice to manage it all is my eating disorder (which definitely has some obsessive compulsive tendencies).

Yeah, re: the ICD 11, complex PTSD is in there (finally), but it's not out yet really or something so whilst I have complex PTSD in my diagnosis list, I think they've just decided to retain the EPCACE diagnosis from the ICD 10 whilst they wait around. When you look for EPCACE in the ICD 11 it comes up with complex PTSD. I think the DSM calls CPTSD disorders of extreme stress not otherwise specified or something? I might be wrong.

I agree it's a lot with how people disclose information. I think it's hard to disclose though, like it took me years to even think about setting foot in a doctors office about mental health, some I still can't verbalise at all.

Do you work a lot with people who have trauma related issues?
0
reply
marinade
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#15
Report 3 days ago
#15
(Original post by Pathway)
Wow, thanks! I've not seen the DSMs criteria in this much detail before, the one I got shown was very brief lol. It's sorta quite astounding how many things it impacts. I haven't ever self-medicated with drugs or alcohol, guess my vice to manage it all is my eating disorder (which definitely has some obsessive compulsive tendencies).
In terms of the DSM, some people are very wary to talk about it. For me, philosophically the issue is a lot of people read just the criteria anyway or indirectly and it's sort of slowly being synthesised in the public's collective mind. A lot of the 'useful' stuff is to me the guidance which I believe can be quite illuminating especially when integrated into discussions about peoples' experiences. People can then mull it over and then discuss it with their doctor. There are downsides too.

Yeah, re: the ICD 11, complex PTSD is in there (finally), but it's not out yet really or something so whilst I have complex PTSD in my diagnosis list, I think they've just decided to retain the EPCACE diagnosis from the ICD 10 whilst they wait around. When you look for EPCACE in the ICD 11 it comes up with complex PTSD. I think the DSM calls CPTSD disorders of extreme stress not otherwise specified or something? I might be wrong.
C-PTSD isn't in the DSM-V. When it was written some say it was felt by those publishing that the wide range of symptoms in its own section along with severity, acute or chronic covered things sufficiently. There have been various theories about why that is. The DSM does have otherwise not specified, but it does that throughout the DSM. I didn't really want to get onto C-PTSD, but I've met people who have one lot of services say C-PTSD and another lot refuse to and say PTSD. It isn't something universally agreed and there are different opinions on.


I agree it's a lot with how people disclose information. I think it's hard to disclose though, like it took me years to even think about setting foot in a doctors office about mental health, some I still can't verbalise at all.
Especially related to the last point on C-PTSD. Also related to more generally to anxiety/depression and diagnoses and what might cause them and why some things are more likely to be diagnosed than others. Also some stuff like addictions and domestic abuse and other areas is so specialist and funding is non-existent.

Do you work a lot with people who have trauma related issues?

No, no, I volunteer. I meet people with trauma in terms of PTSD, yes. A wide range of traumas, some very graphic. Some lovely people have horrible things happen to them, others have more stereotypically every day traumas that affect them badly but sometimes don't affect other people. In terms of anxiety/depression conditions and the trauma in wider sense and people talking about the past not necessarily having flashbacks, yes extremely common. Where I volunteer a lot of contacts with a variety of services. Also know people work in addictions, in a previous job I had some contact that the general public would be a bit less likely to come across. At volunteering I can't diagnose anyone, but because of the nature of volunteering I have to spend time thinking about symptoms and how these differ between people, how they might relate and differ between different conditions. Ones people are willing to share, ones people are less keen on due to stigma or misunderstanding.
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 days ago
#16
(Original post by marinade)
In terms of the DSM, some people are very wary to talk about it. For me, philosophically the issue is a lot of people read just the criteria anyway or indirectly and it's sort of slowly being synthesised in the public's collective mind. A lot of the 'useful' stuff is to me the guidance which I believe can be quite illuminating especially when integrated into discussions about peoples' experiences. People can then mull it over and then discuss it with their doctor. There are downsides too.



C-PTSD isn't in the DSM-V. When it was written some say it was felt by those publishing that the wide range of symptoms in its own section along with severity, acute or chronic covered things sufficiently. There have been various theories about why that is. The DSM does have otherwise not specified, but it does that throughout the DSM. I didn't really want to get onto C-PTSD, but I've met people who have one lot of services say C-PTSD and another lot refuse to and say PTSD. It isn't something universally agreed and there are different opinions on.




Especially related to the last point on C-PTSD. Also related to more generally to anxiety/depression and diagnoses and what might cause them and why some things are more likely to be diagnosed than others. Also some stuff like addictions and domestic abuse and other areas is so specialist and funding is non-existent.




No, no, I volunteer. I meet people with trauma in terms of PTSD, yes. A wide range of traumas, some very graphic. Some lovely people have horrible things happen to them, others have more stereotypically every day traumas that affect them badly but sometimes don't affect other people. In terms of anxiety/depression conditions and the trauma in wider sense and people talking about the past not necessarily having flashbacks, yes extremely common. Where I volunteer a lot of contacts with a variety of services. Also know people work in addictions, in a previous job I had some contact that the general public would be a bit less likely to come across. At volunteering I can't diagnose anyone, but because of the nature of volunteering I have to spend time thinking about symptoms and how these differ between people, how they might relate and differ between different conditions. Ones people are willing to share, ones people are less keen on due to stigma or misunderstanding.
To be honest, I think in the UK a lot of the reason why people aren't treated in the right way isn't just because they don't disclose in the "right" way, but like you said, also related to the lack of specialist services. I think I just got lucky that there was a specialist trauma team where I was at university and where I live now they have specialist services for people who have complex, long-term needs alongside complex trauma. It makes me sad in a lot of ways that not everyone will be able to access services they need because of funding issues or they're not deemed in enough need. I know that the current psychological service team I'm under has lost a lot of clinical psychologists in the last few years because of funding cuts and stuff, it's sad. I do also think that a lot of clinicians (specifically talking about psychiatrists and GPs) aren't really that trauma informed, so they don't know what to do/say, so they minimise a person's trauma which makes that person less likely to disclose in the future. I see this in the CPTSD subreddit quite often.

That's pretty amazing the work you do, I'm sure the people you speak with really appreciate you and the people you volunteer with.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#17
Report Thread starter 4 hours ago
#17
Thank you to everyone who has replied.
0
reply
thesnowbones
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#18
Report 27 minutes ago
#18
(Original post by Anonymous)
Does anyone know how PTSD is defined?

I have always had anxiety, but it seems to be very bad and getting worse following a traumatic incident approximately 18 months ago. But I don't know if it is just another manifestation of my anxiety, or if this is actually PTSD?

Anyone with knowledge/experience, I appreciate your thoughts and/or advise...
PTSD is different for everyone, and it depends what has caused your trauma. I suffer from it, and suffer from flashbacks, anxiety attacks, etc, but it took a long time for me to get an 'official' diagnosis. I was passed from pillar to post at my GP surgery, but was eventually referred to a very competent psychiatrist who made the diagnosis and helped me get the right treatment. I would advise not to get too caught up with getting a diagnosis though, as it can be a really tough process. Do some reading and educate yourself. That helped me immensely.
1
reply
Anonymous #3
#19
Report 16 minutes ago
#19
Hi, speaking as somebody with anxiety and who has been through something that causes/caused me a lot of anxiety but does not have PTSD (I don't think, anyway.) I think that for me personally, my "thing" (which wasn't overly bad, I have only ever heard of it being after something serious, like death or ab*se etc.) caused my anxiety to worsen significantly because there were elements of it that drew on pre-existing anxieties that I'd had for several years beforehand, and then multiply them by a thousand (I'm not exaggerating.) Everybody who experiences anxiety disorders will have events that feed into them, the same way that I can pinpoint things that people have said/done or things that happened that led to my eating disorder. I think the difference between having something that worsened your anxiety and having PTSD is in how you respond to it. Do you find it difficult to talk about, or get anxious when you think about that specific moment, or flashbacks or nightmares? So, I find my "thing" difficult to talk about and very few people know what happened, and it sometimes makes me anxious (so, right now, I'm thinking about it - I feel a little anxious but not panic attack level or anything), but I've never had nightmares or flashbacks relating to it. Although, being in situations similar to it often sends me into a (near or full) panic attack. This is making it sound a lot more like PTSD than it is. I just think of it as a thing that impacted me. Ultimately, only a doctor can diagnose you, but it depends on how debilitating (which it isn't for me) it is as to whether it is a part of your anxiety or a separate diagnosis.
0
reply
Anonymous #3
#20
Report 13 minutes ago
#20
(Original post by thesnowbones)
PTSD is different for everyone, and it depends what has caused your trauma. I suffer from it, and suffer from flashbacks, anxiety attacks, etc, but it took a long time for me to get an 'official' diagnosis. I was passed from pillar to post at my GP surgery, but was eventually referred to a very competent psychiatrist who made the diagnosis and helped me get the right treatment. I would advise not to get too caught up with getting a diagnosis though, as it can be a really tough process. Do some reading and educate yourself. That helped me immensely.
Yep, diagnoses don't change what you are experiencing. I was never diagnosed with anorexia because I needed therapy so desperately and a diagnosis would only elongate the process. Although I don't know if I have completely screwed up my body in the process, getting the help I needed was far more important and beneficial. Also, therapy isn't as bad as it sounds to some. Therapy should be like going to the dentist if you ask me!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

2,764

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have grade requirements for your sixth form/college?

At least 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (34)
15.96%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 5 (31)
14.55%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (43)
20.19%
Higher than 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (82)
38.5%
Pass in English and Maths GCSE (11)
5.16%
No particular grades needed (12)
5.63%

Watched Threads

View All