Why is mental health support so bad in UK? Watch

LittleX
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It's not like I would personally need it, I am just wondering after reading some articles and talking to other people around me and I can't sleep now.

Only support you will get here is 'Take these pills and bye' it's not my personal experience but I heard it from more people around me and from what I read online.

At work, there was a proud poster about mental health issues and how they are mindful but that 'charity' was creating so many mental issues to many young people working for them and their solution was 'Make a silly head if you have mental problems'.

So why is it so bad?
Last edited by LittleX; 1 week ago
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normanis
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Tories.
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Pathway
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Idk, there's loads of different reasons.
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NotNotBatman
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Budget cuts to mental health trusts has lead to an sharp decrease in the number of beds available for patients with severe mental health problems. There has been a reduction in the number of mental health nurses and specialist psychiatrist in the NHS and they opt for private practices or working abroad because the treatment of doctors by the tory government has been poor. This leads to the police having to intervene when someone is having a psychotic episode and resources in that area are also taking a hit, it is then even more difficult to properly fund the NHS and create incentives for specialist psychiatrist and nurses if you're having to fund Police to tackle the problem. Also many areas of the NHS are struggling, I can even see it happening anecdotally, because I have a longstanding health condition meaning I've been a regular at the hospital for 10 years. Waiting times are increasing, the number of doctors is decreasing, the duration between offered appointments are getting longer and funding for my drugs have a shorter time limit (although this is understandable because it is the most expensive drug the NHS provides and it's not going to be provided by the NHS anymore, in favour of biosimilars which some have not taken well to). The funding that is going towards mental health trusts is therefore being used to counterbalance the cuts in other areas.

This has lead to GPs heavily reducing the number of referrals they make the psychiatrists and an increase in the number of people stuck in the loop of GP>CBT/DBT or a similar type>arrested>psychiatric ward> GP>...

It is really frustrating, given that I have to really on these services for my everyday life for the rest of my life.
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NotNotBatman
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(Original post by normanis)
Tories.
My explanation put succinctly.
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LittleX
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(Original post by NotNotBatman)
Budget cuts to mental health trusts has lead to an sharp decrease in the number of beds available for patients with severe mental health problems. There has been a reduction in the number of mental health nurses and specialist psychiatrist in the NHS and they opt for private practices or working abroad because the treatment of doctors by the tory government has been poor. This leads to the police having to intervene when someone is having a psychotic episode and resources in that area are also taking a hit, it is then even more difficult to properly fund the NHS and create incentives for specialist psychiatrist and nurses if you're having to fund Police to tackle the problem. Also many areas of the NHS are struggling, I can even see it happening anecdotally, because I have a longstanding health condition meaning I've been a regular at the hospital for 10 years. Waiting times are increasing, the number of doctors is decreasing, the duration between offered appointments are getting longer and funding for my drugs have a shorter time limit (although this is understandable because it is the most expensive drug the NHS provides and it's not going to be provided by the NHS anymore, in favour of biosimilars which some have not taken well to). The funding that is going towards mental health trusts is therefore being used to counterbalance the cuts in other areas.

This has lead to GPs heavily reducing the number of referrals they make the psychiatrists and an increase in the number of people stuck in the loop of GP>CBT/DBT or a similar type>arrested>psychiatric ward> GP>...

It is really frustrating, given that I have to really on these services for my everyday life for the rest of my life.
Yeah, I do agree with this because when I was working for that 'charity' we had lots of police drops of and basically all of them were people with some mental health issues, etc.
I also think that people are getting more crazy nowadays because of the political and economic situations. People are being forced to work more and more, being tracked every second (Amazon, etc.) and while you have to work more and more you get less and less in return, because of inflation and mental health support is also getting worse and less available, so I really wonder how this ends up.
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Pathway
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(Original post by NotNotBatman)
Budget cuts to mental health trusts has lead to an sharp decrease in the number of beds available for patients with severe mental health problems. There has been a reduction in the number of mental health nurses and specialist psychiatrist in the NHS and they opt for private practices or working abroad because the treatment of doctors by the tory government has been poor. This leads to the police having to intervene when someone is having a psychotic episode and resources in that area are also taking a hit, it is then even more difficult to properly fund the NHS and create incentives for specialist psychiatrist and nurses if you're having to fund Police to tackle the problem. Also many areas of the NHS are struggling, I can even see it happening anecdotally, because I have a longstanding health condition meaning I've been a regular at the hospital for 10 years. Waiting times are increasing, the number of doctors is decreasing, the duration between offered appointments are getting longer and funding for my drugs have a shorter time limit (although this is understandable because it is the most expensive drug the NHS provides and it's not going to be provided by the NHS anymore, in favour of biosimilars which some have not taken well to). The funding that is going towards mental health trusts is therefore being used to counterbalance the cuts in other areas.

This has lead to GPs heavily reducing the number of referrals they make the psychiatrists and an increase in the number of people stuck in the loop of GP>CBT/DBT or a similar type>arrested>psychiatric ward> GP>...

It is really frustrating, given that I have to really on these services for my everyday life for the rest of my life.
I agree so much re: police, tbh they're often nicer than the so called MH professionals, which is saying a lot. If you need specialist input for mental health you're mostly SOL because there just aren't the professionals available. I waited around a year to get specialist therapy from the NHS, and yeah, my psychologist is great, but could've done without being threatened with getting sectioned every other week because I wasn't coping. lol.

I've also had similar issues outside of just MH services, I had to wait like over a year to see a specialist cardiologist (I was referred out from my cardiologist here), and whilst they're actually amazing now I've actually seen them, would've been nice to see them earlier. Lol.
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marinade
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For most of human history mental health services have been appalling. If you think not talk to people in their 60s, 70s and 80s candidly about what mental health services used to be like. Even as recently as the 1990s absolutely crazy stuff was done. This is despite the amazing effort of some individuals working in the system it to nudge it forward. When the system was terrible to begin with it's hard to move it forward.

The internet has transformed mental health awareness. In the age of austerity savage cuts with more people than ever asking for services in the explosion in mental health sharing the last few years, the system does look 'bad'.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by normanis)
Tories.
Ok https://www.bbc.com/news/health-42393071
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normanis
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Nothing in that article disproved my point?
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