Should workers get bereavement for the death of pets? Watch

Andrew97
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...-west-49346408

I feel many people will say yes, but I think that opens a can of worms.
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Bio 7
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No.
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Napp
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I'm all for it.
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joey11223
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Interesting question but I think its a bit of a slippery slope, in that at what stage can you draw the line and say x pet isn't "significant" enough to allow leave. I do empathize with someone who's had a dog for 14 years, they do become like a member of the family in a way. I had a cat from 11 to 25, I was pretty upset when he died, albeit it didn't stop me going to work, and I know others who have lost dogs and still come to work (though there were visibly upset). I would say paid leave is a bit of a stretch possibly, maybe unpaid if you accept that? Or just pull a sickie for one day if you really need it.
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SlS66
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I've seen colleagues work quality slump after death of a pet. However, any leave following pet bereavement needs to fall within the current guidelines. If someone is having emotional difficulties then this needs to be taken as sick, compassionate leave, giving evidence if it's prolonged. Simply saying I can't come in my dogs dead isn't enough to warrant time off. It's how employees deal with the bereavement and if it's affecting performance. This has to be on case by case basis, backed up by evidence( go etc) or a strong letter requesting compassionate leave. So no, unless there are exceptional circumstances affecting the person's ability to do their job.
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ThomH97
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I disagree with the comparison to a person. True, it is upsetting when your dog dies, but this is not the same as an actual human dying.

However, her employer seems pretty brutal. It looks like it was one infraction that cost her her job, and not one that she was at fault for either (such as having a hangover). I would rather look more into that, and bolster workers' rights there for some leniency (I don't know whether she had a poor history and this was the final straw), because if employers are allowed to get rid of people over such small issues then it discourages all employers from taking the time to look after their staff.
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Kutie Karen
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I think staff should be given a few days off for this. Pets can literally be part of a family and their loss can be very upsetting. Compassion is important.
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5frtygvubhj
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(Original post by Kutie Karen)
I think staff should be given a few days off for this. Pets can literally be part of a family and their loss can be very upsetting. Compassion is important.
Do you include all pets in this - or just dogs and cats?

Because I cam see people saying it's ok to have beravement for dogs and cats but you can't have beravement for a budgie, or fish, or hamster etc because we say they are not significant enough. Which is just a whole load of bs imo because who are you to say to someone they can't be sad over their pet gold fish dying but it's ok for them to be sad over their dog or cat dying? People have different emotions towards different animals.
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the bear
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(Original post by Andrew97)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...-west-49346408

I feel many people will say yes, but I think that opens a can of worms.
keeping worms in a can is very distressing. the worm owners need counselling.
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uberteknik
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Worms are comforting and precious pets, but I fear some people will abuse their rights by keeping several hundred in a can and then claim perpetual pet bereavement.

We all know some employers are maggots but come on, pet breavement rights by law invoked by unscrupulous worm owners, would leave them without a leg to stand on.
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SMEGGGY
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****ing ludicrous
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the bear
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(Original post by uberteknik)
Worms are comforting and precious pets, but I fear some people will abuse their rights by keeping several hundred in a can and then claim perpetual pet bereavement.

We all know some employers are maggots but come on, pet breavement rights by law invoked by unscrupulous worm owners, would leave them without a leg to stand on.
the employers will try to wriggle out of it
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Obolinda
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Sure, if they are in significant distress. I'm sure the pain could be just as much as losing a human. Also the employer can judge whether they are taking liberties
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Shadow17
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To get a day off or a day off due to the death of a pet is normal. Only this is regulated exclusively from a moral point of view, according to the law, no days off are set, only at one’s own expense. I have a Norbia horse at home, which we all love. I even buy her special nutritional supplements so she doesn't get nervous, example. But I can’t imagine that my employer will give me time off if something happens to my pet.
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Sorani
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I remember taking a day off when my dog died, my employer was super understanding at the time. To be honest, in this country, a lot of people are closer to their dogs/cats than their own family.
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Kutie Karen
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I recently found out that one of our manager's has a diabetic cat. I never knew that cats can be diabetic and it is so sad. She sometimes takes time off as leave to take the cat to its appointments. So the point is that when such care and dedication is given to a pet then it is only normal to grieve when it passes on. So let's lobby for this.
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SlS66
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I think the key word here is manager. She's more than likely in a position where she can make her hours up. Not everyone will have the option of finishing work at home, rearranging duties etc. She may even be taking leave for pre arranged appointments. Care and dedication does not qualify as a reason for time off and ends at bereavement. Mental health issues as a result of grief would.
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Kutie Karen
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(Original post by SlS66)
I think the key word here is manager. She's more than likely in a position where she can make her hours up. Not everyone will have the option of finishing work at home, rearranging duties etc. She may even be taking leave for pre arranged appointments. Care and dedication does not qualify as a reason for time off and ends at bereavement. Mental health issues as a result of grief would.
She is very flexible and allows others to also have time out if needed for family and pets.
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SlS66
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(Original post by Kutie Karen)
She is very flexible and allows others to also have time out if needed for family and pets.
Sounds like a great environment to work in but bringing this in would be disastrous. Can you imagine the impact in small businesses. There's already procedures in place for compassionate leave and I believe this should be reserved for losing a person not a pet. I love my cat and will be devasted when his times up but there's no way I'd request time off for this.
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ianm69
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hi, my pet died last year; he was 16 years old and brilliant. It affected me; however, I believe unless it's very close family, you should be willing to take holidays if affected by the loss (which let's face it, most of us are). We often love our animals more than people we know, and they often reciprocate the same love back (or is that need)?
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