How many hours should I revise in Year 11? Watch

josamacs
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Hello everyone,

I get the idea that this question has potentially been asked thousands of times before however, I wanted to get a more personalized response.

As the title explains, I would like to know how many hours you people think I should be revising for my GCSE's. I'm going into Year 11 now, so I have under a year until I start my exams.

I am doing the following GCSE's: English, Math’s, Combined Science, Computer Science, Geography, SRS and Business BTEC. I have already completed my Business exam, so no more revision is required for that, additionally, SRS was forced on my and I have no interest in including it in my revision.

I want to do A levels, preferably Computer Science, Physics, Geography and Maths. To do these at my college I require a 6 in computer science, a 6 in the physics part of combined science, a 6 in geography and a 7 in maths.

In my last set of mock exams, I got as follows: A 5 in English, a 5 (borderline 6) in Math’s, A 6 in Computer Science, A 5 in Geography and a 5 in Physics. In Business, I am waiting on my results, but all my coursework is Distinction so the lowest I can get there is A (equivalent) now.

I'm aiming for at least all 7's in Geography, Computer Science, Maths and Physics. As well as 5/6's in the rest.

I struggle to initially focus but once I am focused, I can end up spending far too much time on something and lose track of time.

Based on where I am now and where I want to get to, how many hours per day do you guys think I should revise? Examples of you guys or other people’s results are always appreciated.

Thanks in advance for all your responses everyone!
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trZ15
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(Original post by josamacs)
Hello everyone,

I get the idea that this question has potentially been asked thousands of times before however, I wanted to get a more personalized response.

As the title explains, I would like to know how many hours you people think I should be revising for my GCSE's. I'm going into Year 11 now, so I have under a year until I start my exams.

I am doing the following GCSE's: English, Math’s, Combined Science, Computer Science, Geography, SRS and Business BTEC. I have already completed my Business exam, so no more revision is required for that, additionally, SRS was forced on my and I have no interest in including it in my revision.

I want to do A levels, preferably Computer Science, Physics, Geography and Maths. To do these at my college I require a 6 in computer science, a 6 in the physics part of combined science, a 6 in geography and a 7 in maths.

In my last set of mock exams, I got as follows: A 5 in English, a 5 (borderline 6) in Math’s, A 6 in Computer Science, A 5 in Geography and a 5 in Physics. In Business, I am waiting on my results, but all my coursework is Distinction so the lowest I can get there is A (equivalent) now.

I'm aiming for at least all 7's in Geography, Computer Science, Maths and Physics. As well as 5/6's in the rest.

I struggle to initially focus but once I am focused, I can end up spending far too much time on something and lose track of time.

Based on where I am now and where I want to get to, how many hours per day do you guys think I should revise? Examples of you guys or other people’s results are always appreciated.

Thanks in advance for all your responses everyone!
With GCSE's I think the key is short but frequent. Try and do about 1-2 hours about 5 days a week to begin with just covering 1-2 subjects per day, obviously this is not realistic and you should know this as you'll have other things on etc but try stick to a weekly/fortnightly schedule to cover x amount of hours of each subject. This really is a rough guide as everyone works at different speeds. To improve focus set a timer each time you work, spend no longer than 40 minutes on one 'session' and always take a break of at least 5 minutes(maybe even more) and try and complete about 3 of these in a day. Always make sure to have one day a week where you don't do any work at all so you can unwind. I did GCSE's way back in 2015 but I got 4A*'s and 8A's (not too sure how these translate to the new grading system). Hope this helps!
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OllyDaws
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just build it up, little and often
what i did was from January (excluding feb as i had mocks then) i did about 30 mins a day
march 1hr
April 1.5-2
may 2hrs
Ill be fair some days i even did 5+ but that was because i enjoyed revising some subjects (surprising but true)
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josamacs
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(Original post by OllyDaws)
just build it up, little and often
what i did was from January (excluding feb as i had mocks then) i did about 30 mins a day
march 1hr
April 1.5-2
may 2hrs
Ill be fair some days i even did 5+ but that was because i enjoyed revising some subjects (surprising but true)
I'm trying to create a flat schedule up until maybe April/May when we start study leave. I was thinking of going with trZ15's idea of 2hrs per weekday flat. Thanks for your response though.
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adri2000
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I didn't do much revision until January time, only revised when I had a test. but make sure your notes are ALL up to date. September to before mocks (usually Nov-Jan time) should all be about making sure everything is organised and ready to revise from. Then I started gradually, and by March I was doing a lot of hours every day. Basically revising every evening for a couple of hours and weekends for about 6 hours. Easter needs to be HARDCORE too.
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OllyDaws
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(Original post by josamacs)
I'm trying to create a flat schedule up until maybe April/May when we start study leave. I was thinking of going with trZ15's idea of 2hrs per weekday flat. Thanks for your response though.
thats a good plan, and im not trying to deter you here and if you can do it try it, 2hrs a day with kill you, well atleast to me without any build up, for my Nov mocks i flat out tried 2hrs without build up and i caused me to breakdown and stop revising as a i lost motivation and couldn't cope (this was 2 weeks before my mocks and then i didnt revise at all till the mocks came round
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mrpopsicle
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Hi, I am going into Year 11 too. My courses are

GCSE English Language (mock grade 5)
GCSE English Literature (mock grade 5)
GCSE Maths (mock grade 4)
GCSE Combined Science (mock grade 5)
GCSE Computer Science (mock grade 9)
Level 2 Award in Finance (completed this year, achieved A*, so no more revision)
Level 2 Award in ICT (mainly coursework based, so doesn't really need much revision)
Level 2 Award in Health and Fitness (they're forcing me to do this as I did Finance in one year, but I have no interest in it and won't be revising for it)

In GCSE English Lit, English Lan, Combined Science and Computer Science I'm aiming for all 7s and above. In Maths, I'm aiming for a 5, as I am doing the foundation papers.

I plan to do 2 hours every day, 6 days a week (I like having Friday's to myself) from the first week of school up until the end of the February half term, and that's about 25 weeks. Each day I will focus on a different subject

Monday - Maths
Tuesday - English
Wedesday - Computer Science
Thursday - Biology
Friday - Nothing
Saturday - Chemistry
Sunday - Physics

For Maths, I will use my CGP revision guide and workbook to complete 3-4 pages a week, by doing so, I will have gone through all the pages in the revision guide and workbook by the end of the 25 weeks (there are about 93 pages in the textbook, and the accompanying workbook)

Computer Science, I plan to make posters for each topic, and I've divided my textbook, where all the content for both paper 1 and 2 is covered over about 100 pages, by 25 so that roughly I'll make posters for 4 pages of the text book a week. I'll also do 4 pages of questions for the related pages in the CGP workbook too.

Biology, Chemistry and Physics I'm not too sure about, but I'm thinking for one subject make notes for every topic, another subject make flashcards for every topic, and then another one make a set of multiple choice quizzes for every topic. I haven't really decided yet.

For English (I'm doing AQA), I've decided that I will spend 12 weeks on English Lit, and 12 weeks on English Lan. For each of these, I'll spend 6 weeks on each paper, and half of those for the Part A of that paper, and the other half for the Part B of that paper. I haven't really decided exactly how I'll revise English yet. Probably mind maps, and for Language technique practice.

My thinking is that by the end of the February half term, I'll have mind maps, notes, flash cards, posters and multiple choice quizzes for every topic in every subject, and then I'll be able to just go over them (memorise, cover, repeat) and focus on doing past practice papers and refining my exam timings and techniques up until the exams.

Hopefully you've found me helpful, sorry for going on and on a bit lmao If you wanna talk PM me, it's nice knowing other people also doing GCSEs next year
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TngHic
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(Original post by mrpopsicle)
Hi, I am going into Year 11 too. My courses are

GCSE English Language (mock grade 5)
GCSE English Literature (mock grade 5)
GCSE Maths (mock grade 4)
GCSE Combined Science (mock grade 5)
GCSE Computer Science (mock grade 9)
Level 2 Award in Finance (completed this year, achieved A*, so no more revision)
Level 2 Award in ICT (mainly coursework based, so doesn't really need much revision)
Level 2 Award in Health and Fitness (they're forcing me to do this as I did Finance in one year, but I have no interest in it and won't be revising for it)

In GCSE English Lit, English Lan, Combined Science and Computer Science I'm aiming for all 7s and above. In Maths, I'm aiming for a 5, as I am doing the foundation papers.

I plan to do 2 hours every day, 6 days a week (I like having Friday's to myself) from the first week of school up until the end of the February half term, and that's about 25 weeks. Each day I will focus on a different subject

Monday - Maths
Tuesday - English
Wedesday - Computer Science
Thursday - Biology
Friday - Nothing
Saturday - Chemistry
Sunday - Physics

For Maths, I will use my CGP revision guide and workbook to complete 3-4 pages a week, by doing so, I will have gone through all the pages in the revision guide and workbook by the end of the 25 weeks (there are about 93 pages in the textbook, and the accompanying workbook)

Computer Science, I plan to make posters for each topic, and I've divided my textbook, where all the content for both paper 1 and 2 is covered over about 100 pages, by 25 so that roughly I'll make posters for 4 pages of the text book a week. I'll also do 4 pages of questions for the related pages in the CGP workbook too.

Biology, Chemistry and Physics I'm not too sure about, but I'm thinking for one subject make notes for every topic, another subject make flashcards for every topic, and then another one make a set of multiple choice quizzes for every topic. I haven't really decided yet.

For English (I'm doing AQA), I've decided that I will spend 12 weeks on English Lit, and 12 weeks on English Lan. For each of these, I'll spend 6 weeks on each paper, and half of those for the Part A of that paper, and the other half for the Part B of that paper. I haven't really decided exactly how I'll revise English yet. Probably mind maps, and for Language technique practice.

My thinking is that by the end of the February half term, I'll have mind maps, notes, flash cards, posters and multiple choice quizzes for every topic in every subject, and then I'll be able to just go over them (memorise, cover, repeat) and focus on doing past practice papers and refining my exam timings and techniques up until the exams.

Hopefully you've found me helpful, sorry for going on and on a bit lmao If you wanna talk PM me, it's nice knowing other people also doing GCSEs next year
I seem to have took the same subjects as you. Did my GCSE'S this year, pending results next thursday but was/am a grade 7-9 student.

I had the same idea in my head I will do this. this is my plan etc. Didn't happen.

The moment you tell yourself you actually have to do it, you find distractions, it doesn't go as well you thought. This is different for some people but the general consensus is it's harder to actually do what you're telling yourself to. So since i've gone through the process I'm gonna give you some tips (cause im nice like that uwu )

Ok so first of all, what i'm about to tell you is just general facts, some of it *may* scare you, some of it will relieve you. Regardless it's gonna help in the long run.

First of all your mindset of planning out how long you're gonna do each subject for and when for long term is good! But from the looks of what you've told yourself you're going to do, it seems like you may not have thoroughly been told revision strategies yet.. which is understandable since you've technically never sat a class in year 11 yet.

-Your exams are less than a year away
-You only need a 4. Your school WILL tell you, you need 5's and 6's. Unless you want A-levels in them, employers AND universities only want that bog standard pass and usually only for english language and maths.
-Most of your peers will not revise. If people revise, it'll likely be cramming the night before and in the upcoming week, majority of people WILL procrastinate for the next 8 months or so.
-Your exams WILL be one of the hardest series yet. But the most balanced. 2017 series was a mess, first time with 1-9 system. 2018 was hard as nails. 2019... we got it lucky. tests were easy. BUT the grade boundaries are gonna be high for us. The exam boards now have a clear idea of the level of difficulty they want to achieve with the tests and the grade boundaries meaning you're gonna have it tough... but fair, not easy/hard and unfair.

Maths:
That textbook isn't gonna be something you want for months. 3-4 pages a night? Eh you could get the book complete in 2 months. The book is pretty useless to, atleast it was fore me. It gives you a basic explanation but usually the harder versions of the questions are not present. It leads you into a false sense of security that you know the topic inside and out, but in reality if it appears at the back end of the paper, the book won't have taught you how to tackle it. It teaches you the bog-standard principle and the basic problem solving. Some entire topics are forced into a small box in the corner of the page like elevations. So not ideal. Also the strategies and step by step explanations could be different to your school leading to unnecessary confusion. It's good for a few basic practice questions as well, BUT the answers do not come with explanation, so if you cant understand where the answer comes from you'll be boggled for eternity. Furthermore the practice questions are limited, the question work book and answer book are two separate paid guides to the revision book so that's a fair bit of dosh to spend.

I recommend a few sites. Mathsbot. Corbett maths and mathsgenie. Helped me a lot. Corbett maths has EVERY known topic and videos ranging from one minute to 10 minutes with practice examples and explanations. They're quick and simple but VERY effective, and you can get lots covered. It also has tons of practice questions with answers, both of which easy to find and acessible. Mathsbot gives you randomly generated potential exam questions and you can filter the searches to give you specific topics, or topics from a certain grade boundary, also a countdown to exams and past boundaries. Mathsgenie has a ton of prediction papers from last year, this year, and years dating back to early 2000's... very ancient, very effective, very good practice. You'll get your own set of prediction papers early may 2020.

Computer science:
Honestly you have that cracked down. Computer science is about definitions and explanations. Never much more too it... well in component one. Paper 2, the programming is UNPREDICTABLE. Computer science programming was a breeze this year, it'll be walking on legos for you likely then. Programming, some people have a born talent for it, most do not. Programmings strength does NOT come from posters or information. It comes from practicality. Assuming this is OCR, which most people do OCR LOVE to throw themselves into scenarios "OCR SHOPS" "OCR LAND" "OCR CARS" ect. ect. they will find ANY scenario from ANYTHING and give you a scenario you've never seen before. You cannot revise for that question specifically like you can paper 1 where the content is facts and explanations. You'll need to train your brain for computational thinking, to extract information and use your programming knowledge to apply what you know to the situation. Everything you need to answer any scenario with an algorithm will have been taught to you so EVERY question is accessible.

You say you got a 9 though, me too. For mocks atleast, results pending. So i dont think you're exactly struggling with programming lolol but it's always good to be practical with programming since anything can and often will come up. Nothing would've prepared me specifically for "ocr theme parks" and "ocr football club" in this years papers, my saving grace is that i trained my mind to program. Python (which is assume is what you're doing since thats the general GCSE especially for OCR code) is free to download anyway, or atleast python IDE'S online. If not, im sure the same applies to C* or whatever other program you use. Tons of scenarios and code examples online. Just remember you dont have the internet to steal code from in an exam like you can in class, dont get accustomed to searching up snippets of code for help.

But like you say, you got a 9. which is dope mate.

The sciences:
BIO: Biology is facts and explanations. But there's a lot of them. Read the revision guides, make flashcards especially for this and answer LOTS of exam questions. You'll find a lot of biology exam questions follow a formula and due to being facts and explanations and suggestions and reasoning, the answers are never too different. it's learn and refresh all the way

Chemistry: Same as biology with a bit more practicality and maths

PHYSICS: KNOW THE EQUATIONS. Don't leave it too late, write them all down, recite them, get them stuck in your brain. The physics equations are the ones people ALWAYS sleep on and leave it until last minute because "they're hard to remember" BUT THEN U DO IT, AND ACTUALLY ITS NOT HARD, YOU JUST LEFT IT TOO LATE. Learn the equations early, they are so much easier than you think and the only maths you'll have to do. It's basic substitution and rearrangement into an equation, once you know it and practice it, it's cracked. then the rest is same as bio and chem, learn and reason boi.

English: Hardest to revise for without doubt. You just gotta focus on the important stuff. In literature characters, themes, locations. That's what's gonna appear in the questions. Have em hammered down, read the texts every few months again so u have the entire plot drilled into your mind. Language, i have found. WEIRD SUGGESTION I KNOW. Online roleplay in your favourite fandoms etc. is incredibly effective. It forces you to learn new vocabulary, it focuses on you to create and describe vivid locations and scenarios and it forces you to learn how to write compelling scenarios. It's fun, it's easy, it's a hobby and strengthens english ability!!

Hope this somehow helped further you!
Good luck next year with your exams. TRUST ME. IT'S NOT AS SCARY AS IT SEEMS

also a very general tip but

please

dear god please

value your time in year 11, don't say you wanna quit school, don't "look forward to the end". Because i really do promise you, when you actually get to the end. You will miss it so much. Haven't started sixth form yet but I miss high school, i miss the people, i miss regular class. these subjects like maths and physics i may not have liked much at the time but id love to go back and do it again. Value your time while you have it, don't let stress and pressure ruin this year cause year 11 you will make sacred bonds with not just friends but you'll see a focused and caring side to your teachers aswell.
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mrpopsicle
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(Original post by TngHic)
I seem to have took the same subjects as you. Did my GCSE'S this year, pending results next thursday but was/am a grade 7-9 student.

I had the same idea in my head I will do this. this is my plan etc. Didn't happen.

The moment you tell yourself you actually have to do it, you find distractions, it doesn't go as well you thought. This is different for some people but the general consensus is it's harder to actually do what you're telling yourself to. So since i've gone through the process I'm gonna give you some tips (cause im nice like that uwu )

Ok so first of all, what i'm about to tell you is just general facts, some of it *may* scare you, some of it will relieve you. Regardless it's gonna help in the long run.

First of all your mindset of planning out how long you're gonna do each subject for and when for long term is good! But from the looks of what you've told yourself you're going to do, it seems like you may not have thoroughly been told revision strategies yet.. which is understandable since you've technically never sat a class in year 11 yet.

-Your exams are less than a year away
-You only need a 4. Your school WILL tell you, you need 5's and 6's. Unless you want A-levels in them, employers AND universities only want that bog standard pass and usually only for english language and maths.
-Most of your peers will not revise. If people revise, it'll likely be cramming the night before and in the upcoming week, majority of people WILL procrastinate for the next 8 months or so.
-Your exams WILL be one of the hardest series yet. But the most balanced. 2017 series was a mess, first time with 1-9 system. 2018 was hard as nails. 2019... we got it lucky. tests were easy. BUT the grade boundaries are gonna be high for us. The exam boards now have a clear idea of the level of difficulty they want to achieve with the tests and the grade boundaries meaning you're gonna have it tough... but fair, not easy/hard and unfair.

Maths:
That textbook isn't gonna be something you want for months. 3-4 pages a night? Eh you could get the book complete in 2 months. The book is pretty useless to, atleast it was fore me. It gives you a basic explanation but usually the harder versions of the questions are not present. It leads you into a false sense of security that you know the topic inside and out, but in reality if it appears at the back end of the paper, the book won't have taught you how to tackle it. It teaches you the bog-standard principle and the basic problem solving. Some entire topics are forced into a small box in the corner of the page like elevations. So not ideal. Also the strategies and step by step explanations could be different to your school leading to unnecessary confusion. It's good for a few basic practice questions as well, BUT the answers do not come with explanation, so if you cant understand where the answer comes from you'll be boggled for eternity. Furthermore the practice questions are limited, the question work book and answer book are two separate paid guides to the revision book so that's a fair bit of dosh to spend.

I recommend a few sites. Mathsbot. Corbett maths and mathsgenie. Helped me a lot. Corbett maths has EVERY known topic and videos ranging from one minute to 10 minutes with practice examples and explanations. They're quick and simple but VERY effective, and you can get lots covered. It also has tons of practice questions with answers, both of which easy to find and acessible. Mathsbot gives you randomly generated potential exam questions and you can filter the searches to give you specific topics, or topics from a certain grade boundary, also a countdown to exams and past boundaries. Mathsgenie has a ton of prediction papers from last year, this year, and years dating back to early 2000's... very ancient, very effective, very good practice. You'll get your own set of prediction papers early may 2020.

Computer science:
Honestly you have that cracked down. Computer science is about definitions and explanations. Never much more too it... well in component one. Paper 2, the programming is UNPREDICTABLE. Computer science programming was a breeze this year, it'll be walking on legos for you likely then. Programming, some people have a born talent for it, most do not. Programmings strength does NOT come from posters or information. It comes from practicality. Assuming this is OCR, which most people do OCR LOVE to throw themselves into scenarios "OCR SHOPS" "OCR LAND" "OCR CARS" ect. ect. they will find ANY scenario from ANYTHING and give you a scenario you've never seen before. You cannot revise for that question specifically like you can paper 1 where the content is facts and explanations. You'll need to train your brain for computational thinking, to extract information and use your programming knowledge to apply what you know to the situation. Everything you need to answer any scenario with an algorithm will have been taught to you so EVERY question is accessible.

You say you got a 9 though, me too. For mocks atleast, results pending. So i dont think you're exactly struggling with programming lolol but it's always good to be practical with programming since anything can and often will come up. Nothing would've prepared me specifically for "ocr theme parks" and "ocr football club" in this years papers, my saving grace is that i trained my mind to program. Python (which is assume is what you're doing since thats the general GCSE especially for OCR code) is free to download anyway, or atleast python IDE'S online. If not, im sure the same applies to C* or whatever other program you use. Tons of scenarios and code examples online. Just remember you dont have the internet to steal code from in an exam like you can in class, dont get accustomed to searching up snippets of code for help.

But like you say, you got a 9. which is dope mate.

The sciences:
BIO: Biology is facts and explanations. But there's a lot of them. Read the revision guides, make flashcards especially for this and answer LOTS of exam questions. You'll find a lot of biology exam questions follow a formula and due to being facts and explanations and suggestions and reasoning, the answers are never too different. it's learn and refresh all the way

Chemistry: Same as biology with a bit more practicality and maths

PHYSICS: KNOW THE EQUATIONS. Don't leave it too late, write them all down, recite them, get them stuck in your brain. The physics equations are the ones people ALWAYS sleep on and leave it until last minute because "they're hard to remember" BUT THEN U DO IT, AND ACTUALLY ITS NOT HARD, YOU JUST LEFT IT TOO LATE. Learn the equations early, they are so much easier than you think and the only maths you'll have to do. It's basic substitution and rearrangement into an equation, once you know it and practice it, it's cracked. then the rest is same as bio and chem, learn and reason boi.

English: Hardest to revise for without doubt. You just gotta focus on the important stuff. In literature characters, themes, locations. That's what's gonna appear in the questions. Have em hammered down, read the texts every few months again so u have the entire plot drilled into your mind. Language, i have found. WEIRD SUGGESTION I KNOW. Online roleplay in your favourite fandoms etc. is incredibly effective. It forces you to learn new vocabulary, it focuses on you to create and describe vivid locations and scenarios and it forces you to learn how to write compelling scenarios. It's fun, it's easy, it's a hobby and strengthens english ability!!

Hope this somehow helped further you!
Good luck next year with your exams. TRUST ME. IT'S NOT AS SCARY AS IT SEEMS

also a very general tip but

please

dear god please

value your time in year 11, don't say you wanna quit school, don't "look forward to the end". Because i really do promise you, when you actually get to the end. You will miss it so much. Haven't started sixth form yet but I miss high school, i miss the people, i miss regular class. these subjects like maths and physics i may not have liked much at the time but id love to go back and do it again. Value your time while you have it, don't let stress and pressure ruin this year cause year 11 you will make sacred bonds with not just friends but you'll see a focused and caring side to your teachers aswell.
Aw thanks for all the advice, it's helpful - especially for maths which I'm most worried about. My school has a thing for Hegarty Maths and I can't stand it, and prefer using corbettmaths for revision. I'll check out Maths Bot and Maths Genie too :-)

Computer Science is my strongest point and I'm pretty sure I'll be fine. My school does Python and I've been using Python myself at home for fun as well (now I sound sad oops). I've been programming in JavaScript for years too so I'm pretty confident with most of the algorithm questions.

Out of all my papers in Science, I did the worst in Physics as I didn't revise any of the equations, so I'll defo be making flashcards for them all in September and just keep on revisiting them. Chemistry I didn't do as well as I could, again, a lack of me practising the maths skills found in some of the topics. I did best in Biology though and I enjoy it the most tbh.

I'm always unsure about English revision, so thanks for the suggestions. I'll try roleplay, it sounds like a good (strange but idc lmao) idea. I definitely need to read the texts over again, but I love reading so that won't be too hard anyway.

Thanks for all the help n advice. It's good to get some tips from someone whose actually gone through it lol. I actually know nobody from different schools doing the same subjects as me so that's nice too lmaoo. I generally enjoy school and I'm sure I'll get proper bored when I leave (now I sound like a real saddo). Idrc about not seeing my friends though, my school's a UTC so we go from year 10, and I kinda failed at making friends there but hey Time to spend another year hanging out with the people in the year above me

Again thank youuuu and let me know how you do next week!! PM if you want I need people to talk to lmaooo
Last edited by mrpopsicle; 1 month ago
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M4N12D33n472
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(Original post by TngHic)
I seem to have took the same subjects as you. Did my GCSE'S this year, pending results next thursday but was/am a grade 7-9 student.

I had the same idea in my head I will do this. this is my plan etc. Didn't happen.

The moment you tell yourself you actually have to do it, you find distractions, it doesn't go as well you thought. This is different for some people but the general consensus is it's harder to actually do what you're telling yourself to. So since i've gone through the process I'm gonna give you some tips (cause im nice like that uwu )

Ok so first of all, what i'm about to tell you is just general facts, some of it *may* scare you, some of it will relieve you. Regardless it's gonna help in the long run.

First of all your mindset of planning out how long you're gonna do each subject for and when for long term is good! But from the looks of what you've told yourself you're going to do, it seems like you may not have thoroughly been told revision strategies yet.. which is understandable since you've technically never sat a class in year 11 yet.

-Your exams are less than a year away
-You only need a 4. Your school WILL tell you, you need 5's and 6's. Unless you want A-levels in them, employers AND universities only want that bog standard pass and usually only for english language and maths.
-Most of your peers will not revise. If people revise, it'll likely be cramming the night before and in the upcoming week, majority of people WILL procrastinate for the next 8 months or so.
-Your exams WILL be one of the hardest series yet. But the most balanced. 2017 series was a mess, first time with 1-9 system. 2018 was hard as nails. 2019... we got it lucky. tests were easy. BUT the grade boundaries are gonna be high for us. The exam boards now have a clear idea of the level of difficulty they want to achieve with the tests and the grade boundaries meaning you're gonna have it tough... but fair, not easy/hard and unfair.

Maths:
That textbook isn't gonna be something you want for months. 3-4 pages a night? Eh you could get the book complete in 2 months. The book is pretty useless to, atleast it was fore me. It gives you a basic explanation but usually the harder versions of the questions are not present. It leads you into a false sense of security that you know the topic inside and out, but in reality if it appears at the back end of the paper, the book won't have taught you how to tackle it. It teaches you the bog-standard principle and the basic problem solving. Some entire topics are forced into a small box in the corner of the page like elevations. So not ideal. Also the strategies and step by step explanations could be different to your school leading to unnecessary confusion. It's good for a few basic practice questions as well, BUT the answers do not come with explanation, so if you cant understand where the answer comes from you'll be boggled for eternity. Furthermore the practice questions are limited, the question work book and answer book are two separate paid guides to the revision book so that's a fair bit of dosh to spend.

I recommend a few sites. Mathsbot. Corbett maths and mathsgenie. Helped me a lot. Corbett maths has EVERY known topic and videos ranging from one minute to 10 minutes with practice examples and explanations. They're quick and simple but VERY effective, and you can get lots covered. It also has tons of practice questions with answers, both of which easy to find and acessible. Mathsbot gives you randomly generated potential exam questions and you can filter the searches to give you specific topics, or topics from a certain grade boundary, also a countdown to exams and past boundaries. Mathsgenie has a ton of prediction papers from last year, this year, and years dating back to early 2000's... very ancient, very effective, very good practice. You'll get your own set of prediction papers early may 2020.

Computer science:
Honestly you have that cracked down. Computer science is about definitions and explanations. Never much more too it... well in component one. Paper 2, the programming is UNPREDICTABLE. Computer science programming was a breeze this year, it'll be walking on legos for you likely then. Programming, some people have a born talent for it, most do not. Programmings strength does NOT come from posters or information. It comes from practicality. Assuming this is OCR, which most people do OCR LOVE to throw themselves into scenarios "OCR SHOPS" "OCR LAND" "OCR CARS" ect. ect. they will find ANY scenario from ANYTHING and give you a scenario you've never seen before. You cannot revise for that question specifically like you can paper 1 where the content is facts and explanations. You'll need to train your brain for computational thinking, to extract information and use your programming knowledge to apply what you know to the situation. Everything you need to answer any scenario with an algorithm will have been taught to you so EVERY question is accessible.

You say you got a 9 though, me too. For mocks atleast, results pending. So i dont think you're exactly struggling with programming lolol but it's always good to be practical with programming since anything can and often will come up. Nothing would've prepared me specifically for "ocr theme parks" and "ocr football club" in this years papers, my saving grace is that i trained my mind to program. Python (which is assume is what you're doing since thats the general GCSE especially for OCR code) is free to download anyway, or atleast python IDE'S online. If not, im sure the same applies to C* or whatever other program you use. Tons of scenarios and code examples online. Just remember you dont have the internet to steal code from in an exam like you can in class, dont get accustomed to searching up snippets of code for help.

But like you say, you got a 9. which is dope mate.

The sciences:
BIO: Biology is facts and explanations. But there's a lot of them. Read the revision guides, make flashcards especially for this and answer LOTS of exam questions. You'll find a lot of biology exam questions follow a formula and due to being facts and explanations and suggestions and reasoning, the answers are never too different. it's learn and refresh all the way

Chemistry: Same as biology with a bit more practicality and maths

PHYSICS: KNOW THE EQUATIONS. Don't leave it too late, write them all down, recite them, get them stuck in your brain. The physics equations are the ones people ALWAYS sleep on and leave it until last minute because "they're hard to remember" BUT THEN U DO IT, AND ACTUALLY ITS NOT HARD, YOU JUST LEFT IT TOO LATE. Learn the equations early, they are so much easier than you think and the only maths you'll have to do. It's basic substitution and rearrangement into an equation, once you know it and practice it, it's cracked. then the rest is same as bio and chem, learn and reason boi.

English: Hardest to revise for without doubt. You just gotta focus on the important stuff. In literature characters, themes, locations. That's what's gonna appear in the questions. Have em hammered down, read the texts every few months again so u have the entire plot drilled into your mind. Language, i have found. WEIRD SUGGESTION I KNOW. Online roleplay in your favourite fandoms etc. is incredibly effective. It forces you to learn new vocabulary, it focuses on you to create and describe vivid locations and scenarios and it forces you to learn how to write compelling scenarios. It's fun, it's easy, it's a hobby and strengthens english ability!!

Hope this somehow helped further you!
Good luck next year with your exams. TRUST ME. IT'S NOT AS SCARY AS IT SEEMS

also a very general tip but

please

dear god please

value your time in year 11, don't say you wanna quit school, don't "look forward to the end". Because i really do promise you, when you actually get to the end. You will miss it so much. Haven't started sixth form yet but I miss high school, i miss the people, i miss regular class. these subjects like maths and physics i may not have liked much at the time but id love to go back and do it again. Value your time while you have it, don't let stress and pressure ruin this year cause year 11 you will make sacred bonds with not just friends but you'll see a focused and caring side to your teachers aswell.
Can you tell us your results when you get your GCSE results. Also please share some of the revision methods you used to revise
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m2b
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2 hours a day till Christmas then 4 hours till Easter then intense revision should get you the 7/8/9s
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adri2000
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(Original post by m2b)
2 hours a day till Christmas then 4 hours till Easter then intense revision should get you the 7/8/9s
nah i'd say do a bit more over easter. Easier revising when you're not at school. Try to do 9-5 every day and just have an hour for lunch and a few more 10 minute breaks.
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alice03x
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Honestly, just be careful that you don’t burn yourself out. I was given so much homework up until around end of March/April, I would never have had the time to do 2 hours of revision per day. Granted, once I didn’t have homework as such, I was able to do far more.

All I’m saying is, don’t pressure yourself. Creating a rigid plan doesn’t allow for ‘real-life’, if that makes sense. You might get given a practice paper to complete, and that would be far more use than the four pages of a revision guide that you were planning on doing.

Good luck, I hope it goes well for you
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Tommiebee
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25 hours a day at least.
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(Original post by adri2000)
nah i'd say do a bit more over easter. Easier revising when you're not at school. Try to do 9-5 every day and just have an hour for lunch and a few more 10 minute breaks.
Exactly what i mean by intense.
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(Original post by alice03x)
Honestly, just be careful that you don’t burn yourself out. I was given so much homework up until around end of March/April, I would never have had the time to do 2 hours of revision per day. Granted, once I didn’t have homework as such, I was able to do far more.

All I’m saying is, don’t pressure yourself. Creating a rigid plan doesn’t allow for ‘real-life’, if that makes sense. You might get given a practice paper to complete, and that would be far more use than the four pages of a revision guide that you were planning on doing.

Good luck, I hope it goes well for you
Don’t knock it it was actually quite conventional doing 2 hours a day. Our school gave us free periods where we had our finance lessons from year 10 and pshe so 1 hour was easily fat in during the school hours then 1 hour when i was at home.
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(Original post by m2b)
Don’t knock it it was actually quite conventional doing 2 hours a day. Our school gave us free periods where we had our finance lessons from year 10 and pshe so 1 hour was easily fat in during the school hours then 1 hour when i was at home.
If our school had given us time during the day then I’m sure I could have done it! I just meant if you didn’t have the time during school, don’t put too much pressure on yourself!
My school didn’t give us frees until April, and then it was only once a week. I wish I’d had more to be honest.
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(Original post by alice03x)
If our school had given us time during the day then I’m sure I could have done it! I just meant if you didn’t have the time during school, don’t put too much pressure on yourself!
My school didn’t give us frees until April, and then it was only once a week. I wish I’d had more to be honest.
It can easily be done just with good time management tbf
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(Original post by mrpopsicle)

Computer Science is my strongest point and I'm pretty sure I'll be fine. My school does Python and I've been using Python myself at home for fun as well (now I sound sad oops). I've been programming in JavaScript for years too so I'm pretty confident with most of the algorithm questions.


I'm always unsure about English revision, so thanks for the suggestions. I'll try roleplay, it sounds like a good (strange but idc lmao) idea. I definitely need to read the texts over again, but I love reading so that won't be too hard anyway.
Nah it doesnt sound sad at all! Coding is a lot of fun, it's niche, it's not something people, especially of your age, actually do. It gives you a great head-start as shown by your grade 9. And programming is the language of the future you know. Everything is going to start being run by bots and A.I's and the world is crying out for programmers and computer technicians. It's hard and not many people do it so if you can you have a promising future. Hacking is a professional job, companies hire hackers to try and hack their systems to highlight weaknesses in their security. So the world of code is a great one to be in.

Also online roleplay isn't for everyone either, you may find it fun, you may not. If it's not for you there are so so sooo many other techniques to strengthen english that a guide can't tell you

(Original post by M4N12D33n472)
Can you tell us your results when you get your GCSE results. Also please share some of the revision methods you used to revise
Also Yep! I'll quote you both again tomorrow after i get my results to tell you them, at the same time i'll dump all my revision strategies down especially for my best subjects.
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