m31adam
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I am taking Mathematics, Economics and Geography A-level, going into my 2nd year. I am thinking of taking a Civil Engineering degree.
I'm average at Maths and not good at all at Physics. Also, I am very creative at design and good at mentally visualising structures to understand components. I like jumping between exam work and practicals, but I'm not very good at written coursework projects because I struggle to stick to deadlines.
I'm wondering whether Civil Engineering is right for me? Does it have alot of physics? Is there alot of coursework involved?

Any information at all about the degree would help alot
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by m31adam)
I'm average at Maths and not good at all at Physics....I'm wondering whether Civil Engineering is right for me?
No, it isn't. Civil engineering, as with all engineering degrees, use maths throughout the course, and is wholly based on physics. If you aren't good at and/or don't enjoy maths and physics you should absolutely not do engineering, of any variety.

Creative design abilities and spatial visualisation/awareness are irrelevant in civil engineering. You aren't designing the aesthetics of a building, you're solving mathematical problems about the loads on beams, heat transfer and fluid flow, etc. Architecture may be more appropriate to your abilities and interests as such.
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Newcastle University Ambassador
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(Original post by m31adam)
I am taking Mathematics, Economics and Geography A-level, going into my 2nd year. I am thinking of taking a Civil Engineering degree.
I'm average at Maths and not good at all at Physics. Also, I am very creative at design and good at mentally visualising structures to understand components. I like jumping between exam work and practicals, but I'm not very good at written coursework projects because I struggle to stick to deadlines.
I'm wondering whether Civil Engineering is right for me? Does it have alot of physics? Is there alot of coursework involved?

Any information at all about the degree would help alot
Hi m31adam,

I have just finished my Civil Engineering degree at Newcastle University and found that the maths and physics involved isn't as difficult as I thought it would be when I was applying. So there is definitely a lot of maths and physics compared to non-engineering courses, but it is doable. We did calculations by hand mostly in first year, by third year we primarily used software for calculations as it is easier, more accurate and saves time (some calculations require several iterations and it would just take too long to do it by hand and there is a higher chance of inaccuracy). I know many people who did not do A-Levels, or physics or had alternative routes of entry into Year 1 who have now finished with 2:1's and Firsts, so don't let your current academic performance discourage you - there is a lot more to engineering than maths and physics.

There is about 40%-50% coursework between years 1-3 (this is at Newcastle University, others may be different), the coursework varies between report writing, drawing structures/diagrams, designing structures with software, short calculations, and so on. I think that if you want to do Civil Engineering, you should. You can have a look at the course offered by Newcastle University and see if the modules appeal to you: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails

If you have any questions, you can contact the School of Engineering at [email protected].uk

I hope this helps
- Jasmine
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Moments
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It depends where you go, some courses (accredited BEng ones) will place more emphasis on maths and physics than non-accredited BSc ones.

Unfortunately if you're not good at large complex courseworks, i'd avoid Civil Engineering because that is precisely what you will do in your day-to-day job.

Speaking as a structural engineer, the design aspect is as important as the technical component because structural engineers these days blur the line between architecture and engineering. I'm often the liaison between the client, the lead architect and the engineering team. Computers have largely eliminated the role of the human calculator engineer so you definitely need an eye for aesthetics.
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Jan Grafton
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(Original post by Newcastle University Student Ambassador)
Hi m31adam,

I have just finished my Civil Engineering degree at Newcastle University and found that the maths and physics involved isn't as difficult as I thought it would be when I was applying. So there is definitely a lot of maths and physics compared to non-engineering courses, but it is doable. We did calculations by hand mostly in first year, by third year we primarily used software for calculations as it is easier, more accurate and saves time (some calculations require several iterations and it would just take too long to do it by hand and there is a higher chance of inaccuracy). I know many people who did not do A-Levels, or physics or had alternative routes of entry into Year 1 who have now finished with 2:1's and Firsts, so don't let your current academic performance discourage you - there is a lot more to engineering than maths and physics.

There is about 40%-50% coursework between years 1-3 (this is at Newcastle University, others may be different), the coursework varies between report writing, drawing structures/diagrams, designing structures with software, short calculations, and so on. I think that if you want to do Civil Engineering, you should. You can have a look at the course offered by Newcastle University and see if the modules appeal to you: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...#coursedetails

If you have any questions, you can contact the School of Engineering at [email protected]

I hope this helps
- Jasmine
Hi, I live in Newcastle and I'm interested in taking Civil Engineering at Uni. I'm not too fussed about moving out of Ncl as it's probably one of the top 5 cities in the UK, however I havent heard much about it's Civ Eng course, so I was wondering if you recommend it?
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