Penisboy
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So my mate called ancient history a “wish washy subject” and says I cannot do anything with it, however would employers overlook it if it is from a decent university for example Exeter ? A swift and detailed reply would be most appreciated.
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by Penisboy)
So my mate called ancient history a “wish washy subject” and says I cannot do anything with it, however would employers overlook it if it is from a decent university for example Exeter ? A swift and detailed reply would be most appreciated.
https://www.topuniversities.com/stud...history-degree

Your friend isn't a careers advisor I wouldn't listen to them
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Penisboy
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
https://www.topuniversities.com/stud...history-degree

Your friend isn't a careers advisor I wouldn't listen to them
But it’s not a full history degree, it’s a ancient history degree, so would it carry as much weight ?
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by Penisboy)
But it’s not a full history degree, it’s a ancient history degree, so would it carry as much weight ?
Yes its the same for any humanities/arts degree. Work hard for a good grade, and apply for internships/experience.
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Penisboy
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
Yes its the same for any humanities/arts degree. Work hard for a good grade, and apply for internships/experience.
You’re a goddamn super human. Thank you 🎉
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ihatePE
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its the same for engineering/science degree too, you dont get jobs from finishing the degree, you gotta have internships/experience/real world experience of work. basically your degree to some point don't matter much as long as you're not aiming for medicine with ancient history BA
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C.Goodyear
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Its applications in terms of career prospects are very limited
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steamed-hams
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I graduated and can say that the debt is very real. Its not all this oh have to earn this and 30 years that. you're gonna be paying real money back +plus all the other taxes for a very long time. and knowing this is it really worth it for an ancient history degree? who wants ancient history grads?
Last edited by steamed-hams; 5 months ago
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artful_lounger
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Employers, by and large, literally do not care what subject your degree is in. They look to see if you have a degree, they look at your classification, and they maybe look where you got the degree. If you have a 1st from Oxbridge, it doesn't matter whether it's in underwater basket weaving or rocket surgery for generic grad schemes and roles.

It only matters if you want to go into a particular sector which requires you have particular skills beforehand - such as engineering, software development, the economic service, etc. In that case you may need either general skills from a smaller subset of degrees (e.g. a numerate degree) or specialist subject knowledge from a particular degree subject (e.g. economics for the economic service, engineering variously).

Even these can be ameliorated or subverted to some extent; there are an increasing number of software development grad schemes taking applicants from any degree, as they just teach you all the programming necessary in the scheme (and are instead looking for the people with the strongest transferable skills, leadership ability etc). For economics areas, you can do "conversion" diplomas/masters degrees. For STEM fields generally you can actually be funded for a second undergraduate degree in those areas if it's part time.

Additionally as noted above, even in those "specialist" areas, simply having the degree is not enough. It is essential to get appropriate experience from summer placements/internships, year in industry schemes, etc, and for software dev areas, to develop a portfolio of projects you've done on github. The times where a degree was sufficient to just walk into a graduate job are long since past - this only happens with medicine (and maybe dentistry) these days.

Unless you know you want to be an engineer, in which case obviously doing a degree in ancient history would be a poor choice, it really won't make a difference. Do a degree you have a genuine and sustained interest in, as that will be more likely to carry you through to getting a good result.
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steamed-hams
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Employers, by and large, literally do not care what subject your degree is in. They look to see if you have a degree, they look at your classification, and they maybe look where you got the degree. If you have a 1st from Oxbridge, it doesn't matter whether it's in underwater basket weaving or rocket surgery for generic grad schemes and roles.

It only matters if you want to go into a particular sector which requires you have particular skills beforehand - such as engineering, software development, the economic service, etc. In that case you may need either general skills from a smaller subset of degrees (e.g. a numerate degree) or specialist subject knowledge from a particular degree subject (e.g. economics for the economic service, engineering variously).

Even these can be ameliorated or subverted to some extent; there are an increasing number of software development grad schemes taking applicants from any degree, as they just teach you all the programming necessary in the scheme (and are instead looking for the people with the strongest transferable skills, leadership ability etc). For economics areas, you can do "conversion" diplomas/masters degrees. For STEM fields generally you can actually be funded for a second undergraduate degree in those areas if it's part time.

Additionally as noted above, even in those "specialist" areas, simply having the degree is not enough. It is essential to get appropriate experience from summer placements/internships, year in industry schemes, etc, and for software dev areas, to develop a portfolio of projects you've done on github. The times where a degree was sufficient to just walk into a graduate job are long since past - this only happens with medicine (and maybe dentistry) these days.

Unless you know you want to be an engineer, in which case obviously doing a degree in ancient history would be a poor choice, it really won't make a difference. Do a degree you have a genuine and sustained interest in, as that will be more likely to carry you through to getting a good result.
In my experience the degree subject carries weight in job interview. always gonna be in a better position by saying engineering rather than ancient history
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999tigger
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(Original post by Penisboy)
So my mate called ancient history a “wish washy subject” and says I cannot do anything with it, however would employers overlook it if it is from a decent university for example Exeter ? A swift and detailed reply would be most appreciated.
Same as History although not quite as flexible for history teaching. What do you want to do with it?

Ignore mate.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by steamed-hams)
In my experience the degree subject carries weight in job interview. always gonna be in a better position by saying engineering rather than ancient history
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steamed-hams
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
are you sure interview panel will remain indifferent to what subject?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by steamed-hams)
are you sure interview panel will remain indifferent to what subject?
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steamed-hams
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Why
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by steamed-hams)
Why
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sealioning
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steamed-hams
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what is this forum helper?
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