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What to do if I don't get into a medicine university?

I'm thinking applying for mediocre medical universities (UEA, etc.) and want to know what my options are if I get no offers and I still want to be a doctor. E.g. medicine with a foundation year, gap year then reapply etc. Also what should I pick for my 5th option?

Thanks for any help

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Reply 1
Original post by sam72016
I'm thinking applying for mediocre medical universities (UEA, etc.) and want to know what my options are if I get no offers and I still want to be a doctor. E.g. medicine with a foundation year, gap year then reapply etc. Also what should I pick for my 5th option?

Thanks for any help

There are no mediocre medical universities. All med schools are considered equal.
Foundation Year courses are for people with widening access flags
Pick anything you want
(edited 4 years ago)
Reply 2
Okay apologies I thought some medical schools were better than others :/ In terms of resits I have to apply by october through UCAS. Do you mean resit my a levels? Also how does the biomedicine then applying for medicine thing work, I've heard its extremely competitive
have u seen gem
I think it's mainly just based on the raw stats, which of course can be misleading in some ways. GEM courses are usually a lot smaller, so any stats are going to be fairly volatile in terms of successful applicants, plus it may be (for one reason or another) there are more applicants who apply who are already unable to meet the entry criteria and so are instantly rejected, compared to undergraduate medicine, perhaps.

It's hard to say for certain what the case is, unless one is a medical school admissions tutor...or happens to know any :tongue:
(edited 4 years ago)
What a levels did I do? And what grades? Just curious
Lmao yeah
Become a ghetto pharmacist
Reply 8
Original post by artful_lounger
I think it's mainly just based on the raw stats, which of course can be misleading in some ways. GEM courses are usually a lot smaller, so any stats are going to be fairly volatile in terms of successful applicants, plus it may be (for one reason or another) there are more applicants who apply who are already unable to meet the entry criteria and so are instantly rejected, compared to undergraduate medicine, perhaps.

It's hard to say for certain what the case is, unless one is a medical school admissions tutor...or happens to know any :tongue:




My gut feeling is that GEM is more difficult to get into.
In my experience, graduates are usually far better at researching minimum requirements, cut offs, perusing small print for a uni website than school leavers are and as the only comparative data I can find (which is admittedly a bit out of date), suggests the overall graduate-entry selection ratio (applications to admissions) was 12.6:1, significantly higher than A100 (8.2:1) (p < 0.001), then there are 150% of applicants to each place on A101 v A100 and I find it hard to believe that an excess of 1/3 of applicants to A101 do not meet minimum requirements over those for standard entry.

This would also be supported by graduates needing higher UKCAT scores to get an interview at the same establishments, especially given as older sitters of the UKCAT generally score less than school leavers, so is not an correlation of that cohort just having a higher average.

So for each A101 place there are at least 50% more applicants than for A100, which I suggest makes it more competitive and my experience is that graduates are more likely to apply strategically, so I suspect fewer of them are cut out at first assessment than for A100 (no stats to prove this, just what I have seen on here over the years). A stat from the BMJ "After adjusting for UKCAT score, the OR of an offer for graduates versus non-graduates was approximately 0.5 (OR=0.48, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.49)" - although this does not separate out grads on A100, but whichever way, they are saying grads are only half as likely to get an offer as school leavers. []https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/2/e018946]

So trying to look for what evidence I can find whilst watching Andy Murray losing at tennis, I am inclined to stick to my feeling that GEM is more difficult than standard entry (with only half the chance of an offer if the BMJ is to be believed)
(edited 4 years ago)
Reply 9
PRSOM!
Me too :frown:
Reply 10
1 set all, match tie break!! He plays Jamie and Neil in the next round if they win!! I am a secret tennis geek too..........

EDIT: sorry for irrelevant posts, but I worked hard on the earlier one :biggrin:

DOUBLE EDIT: Rabbit out of the hat!!!
(edited 4 years ago)
Huh
Regarding the 4th point you mentioned, I've been researching alternatives for medicine. I will be starting my 3rd-year in my med Phys degree and applying for grad medicine for 2020 entry. Its really made me think because if I don't get an interview/offer I'm considering going to study medicine in Europe as I'm pretty sure you are well aware there are organizations that offer medicine in other med schools in Europe, there is an opening day this Sunday on the 18th of August in London IDK if I'm allowed to say the name of the organization I won't in this reply but I guess some of the students here will know what it is. To get to my question you mentioned that you should study where you want to work, however, I really want to upon completion of a medical degree in Europe want to practice in the UK what would your thoughts be on that?
Reply 13
Original post by Taylan Cakir
Regarding the 4th point you mentioned, I've been researching alternatives for medicine. I will be starting my 3rd-year in my med Phys degree and applying for grad medicine for 2020 entry. Its really made me think because if I don't get an interview/offer I'm considering going to study medicine in Europe as I'm pretty sure you are well aware there are organizations that offer medicine in other med schools in Europe, there is an opening day this Sunday on the 18th of August in London IDK if I'm allowed to say the name of the organization I won't in this reply but I guess some of the students here will know what it is. To get to my question you mentioned that you should study where you want to work, however, I really want to upon completion of a medical degree in Europe want to practice in the UK what would your thoughts be on that?

BREXIT. Who knows what is going to happen........
And in the shorter term there are language issues, as whilst you may be taught in English, the patients you see in clinical years are unlikely to speak it fluently nough to explain their symptoms.
I am also lead to believe that whilst medicine in some parts of Europe is easier to get into, the attrition rate at the end of first year is huge compared to the UK
There is a Medicine Wiki here on TSR - lots of advice and info : https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine

You do need to rethink any snobbery you have about 'lower' Unis in terms of Medicine. As others have pointed out, all are accredited by the GMC, and your future patients are never going to ask you where you trained. It isnt a glamour contest - its about getting a place to train as a doctor. Perhaps you need to rethink why you want to be a doctor.
oh fair
Reply 16
Original post by J0n3zviper
Become a ghetto pharmacist

That's perfect haha
Reply 17
Original post by Anonymous02792
What a levels did I do? And what grades? Just curious

I do chemistry maths biology and an extended project qualification (an AS level). I got chemistry predicted A, biology predicted A and maths predicted A*.
Original post by GANFYD

This would also be supported by graduates needing higher UKCAT scores to get an interview at the same establishments, especially given as Older sitters of the UKCAT generally score less than school leavers, so is not an correlation of that cohort just having a higher average.


@GANFYD I'm sorry to resurrect an old thread, but what did you mean by the part in bold? Do you mean people who say have taken gap year(s) or in their 30s? I did my UCAT and got 3010 but I'm not sure if It would be less competitive given I took 2 gap years.
Original post by blabla2020202
@GANFYD I'm sorry to resurrect an old thread, but what did you mean by the part in bold? Do you mean people who say have taken gap year(s) or in their 30s? I did my UCAT and got 3010 but I'm not sure if It would be less competitive given I took 2 gap years.


Just that older sitters generally have lower scores. Your age does not disadvantage you if you score higher, but you are less likely to do so, statistically, than a Yr 13 - you have bucked that trend :smile:

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