Fzkk
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hello guys
I gave my AS last year
I have a b in both physics and biology
Component grades in bio ACB
Component grades in phy BBE
Any chance of improving to an overall A
With A’s in both p4s and p5s of both subjects?
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Yes, but first you will need to identify what went wrong and caused you to get the lower grades in the first place. Then you will know what to work on - always work smarter, not harder

Make sure you're learning the right content for the exams you'll be sitting, understand how you personally learn best, as well as the most effective ways of revising for the different subjects. For physics really the only way is to do as many practice papers/problems as possible; just solve as many problems as you can get your hands on, and you'll get used to it. You don't need to memorise every formulae you come across, as some will be given to you in the formulae books (find out which) and some can be derived from others. Learn the minimum subset of equations you need to know that will let you derive the full amount you might need in the exam.

I've also asked this thread be moved to the A-levels forum for you
1
reply
Fzkk
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Yes, but first you will need to identify what went wrong and caused you to get the lower grades in the first place. Then you will know what to work on - always work smarter, not harder

Make sure you're learning the right content for the exams you'll be sitting, understand how you personally learn best, as well as the most effective ways of revising for the different subjects. For physics really the only way is to do as many practice papers/problems as possible; just solve as many problems as you can get your hands on, and you'll get used to it. You don't need to memorise every formulae you come across, as some will be given to you in the formulae books (find out which) and some can be derived from others. Learn the minimum subset of equations you need to know that will let you derive the full amount you might need in the exam.

I've also asked this thread be moved to the A-levels forum for you
Thankyou so much, i will try my level best
Any advice for biology? I suckk at p2 and p4
I just do book and past papers
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Fzkk)
Thankyou so much, i will try my level best
Any advice for biology? I suckk at p2 and p4
I just do book and past papers
I didn't do A-levels, I did IB, so my exams were in a different format (and I only did SL Bio), so I can't give any specific advice.

Look at what topics you are getting lower marks on in the past papers, and see if there is any pattern (and obviously, review those). Understand what statements will get you marks in the exam and what won't - refer to the mark schemes, rubrics, and syllabus. Make sure you know the key definitions etc. If you have to do any quantitative work (e.g. stats, physiology questions) make sure you know the relevant procedures/formulae or where you can find them if they're provided in the exam (similar to physics preparation outlined above).

Make sure you know how the exam papers are laid out etc as well, which you should be familiar with anyway, and how long you have in each. Know when to stop on a question which is taking too long and come back later (or just leave it out to focus on others). Just all the usual stuff.
0
reply
Fzkk
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I didn't do A-levels, I did IB, so my exams were in a different format (and I only did SL Bio), so I can't give any specific advice.

Look at what topics you are getting lower marks on in the past papers, and see if there is any pattern (and obviously, review those). Understand what statements will get you marks in the exam and what won't - refer to the mark schemes, rubrics, and syllabus. Make sure you know the key definitions etc. If you have to do any quantitative work (e.g. stats, physiology questions) make sure you know the relevant procedures/formulae or where you can find them if they're provided in the exam (similar to physics preparation outlined above).

Make sure you know how the exam papers are laid out etc as well, which you should be familiar with anyway, and how long you have in each. Know when to stop on a question which is taking too long and come back later (or just leave it out to focus on others). Just all the usual stuff.
Thanks again😉
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (627)
33.66%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (784)
42.08%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (368)
19.75%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (84)
4.51%

Watched Threads

View All