fdsfsrgwghb
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For A levels I want to do Biology, Chemistry and Psychology to go into Biochemistry at University and then go into drug development i.e. creating and testing new drugs. This is going to sound silly but I don't hate Bio and Chem however they aren't my favourite, and I thought to do drug development it wouldn't be the same as doing bio and chem how you do in school. I know it will involve Chemistry and Biology but will it be to the same degree?
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artful_lounger
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It'll be much more on the chemistry side; a chemistry or medicinal chemistry degree, or something related like pharmaceutical science (or maybe pharmacology, although likely not) would probably be better preparation than most biochemistry degrees (which in the UK are normally more molecular biology than biological chemistry). A chemical engineering background might be appropriate for the process side of things.

I imagine for most such roles it would involve a lot of (organic) chemistry. CheeseIsVeg is doing chemistry currently and may have considered that area (I believe Southampton has a fair number of options in medicinal chemistry and related areas) and could potentially advise? At the very least, might be able to advise on the differences between GCSE, A-level, and degree level chemistry.
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CheeseIsVeg
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(Original post by fdsfsrgwghb)
For A levels I want to do Biology, Chemistry and Psychology to go into Biochemistry at University and then go into drug development i.e. creating and testing new drugs. This is going to sound silly but I don't hate Bio and Chem however they aren't my favourite, and I thought to do drug development it wouldn't be the same as doing bio and chem how you do in school. I know it will involve Chemistry and Biology but will it be to the same degree?
Hi there :hi:
It will involve bio and chem but tbh it won't be like anything you'd have done at school before.
It's much more in-depth, more detail, a bit harder and if you're truly interested in drug design/organic chemistry/biochemistry - you will really enjoy it!

I think you need to think about what you like and dislike about the subjects because you will need them to go into this field.
As A_L said, you'll be doing more chemistry (which is more fun anyway :wink2: ) and it's also more interesting too.

I think the best thing for you to do, is find a relevant degree: medicinal sciences, chemistry, biochemistry etc... and choose options that interest you. See where your degree takes you but if you still want to go into drug design - doing a Master's in drug development may be possible.
Look at University Research Areas and see if there's anything that excites you for possible further study!
You may need a PhD for drug discovery etc. and so I'd look at researching a bit more if you can.

Lots more organic chemistry and you do learn a little bit more abut molecules themselves.
GCSE chemistry - v broad and not in-depth
A level chemistry - narrower and skips a few things but quite useful base knowledge for the degree
Degree Chemistry - everything is covered in A level and then brought up to a more advanced. difficult standard.
Everything is a bit more complicated and you learn much more interesting phenomena than ever seen before.

Hope this helps
Cheese



(Original post by artful_lounger)
Itx

I imagine for most such roles it would involve a lot of (organic) chemistry. CheeseIsVeg is doing chemistry currently and may have considered that area (I believe Southampton has a fair number of options in medicinal chemistry and related areas) and could potentially advise? At the very least, might be able to advise on the differences between GCSE, A-level, and degree level chemistry.
:ta:
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