Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 1 month ago
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Hi there,

So I'd really like to become a proofwriter / copywriter on people per hour and was wondering what it's like as a job?

I'm going to university this September and would like to earn some money doing a part time job whilst I'm there and this seems perfect!

Does anyone work on this site as a freelancer?
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
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Anyone worked at people per hour?

Also, another thing I'm interested in doing on people per hour is making logos. The pay is okay and all you need is to be creative and know how to use illustrator.

xoxAngel_Kxox I heard you work here ...?
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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Hey .

Yes, I work with clients on PeoplePerHour.

I started working on this site while I was at uni, and eventually realised that it was good enough of an income to make a full time job out of it, which is what I still do now, seven years after graduation. I have my own house (shared with partner - owned) and car. Currently, my clients pay me between £20-£80 an hour depending on the job, so I admit I don't work full time hours at the moment - I probably work around 25 hours a week on average (as I have hobbies that I like to fit in), some can be quieter and some can be busier, but because of the decent hourly rate I'm on it still works out as more than most of my full time friends earn.

That's what people usually ask me. But if you want to ask anything more specific, just quote me and I'll get back to you .
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Hey .

Yes, I work with clients on PeoplePerHour.

I started working on this site while I was at uni, and eventually realised that it was good enough of an income to make a full time job out of it, which is what I still do now, seven years after graduation. I have my own house (shared with partner - owned) and car. Currently, my clients pay me between £20-£80 an hour depending on the job, so I admit I don't work full time hours at the moment - I probably work around 25 hours a week on average (as I have hobbies that I like to fit in), some can be quieter and some can be busier, but because of the decent hourly rate I'm on it still works out as more than most of my full time friends earn.

That's what people usually ask me. But if you want to ask anything more specific, just quote me and I'll get back to you .
Thank you
What do you do (tasks), what jobs do you get?
Do you need any specific qualifications or experience?
I'm 18 and looking for a part time job

Thanks!
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you
What do you do (tasks), what jobs do you get?
Do you need any specific qualifications or experience?
I'm 18 and looking for a part time job

Thanks!
I work as a writer, editor and proofreader, so take on jobs under those categories. You don't need specific qualifications to sign up, but seeing as you have to write a proposal when you apply for each job, it helps if you do have at least experience if not qualifications. I got around this at the beginning by offering very, very low prices just to get some decent reviews under my belt. I have more than 1,000 reviews now, so if I fancy a job, all I need to do is post a proposal and I'll usually get it. I rarely send proposals though, as I have two major clients who usually have enough work to keep me busy - but if I need some extra cash for something, or I'm bored, I'll sometimes do some little projects too.
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MiaNova
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Didn't even know it was anon lol. 😲

Some more Q's 😌

- Any money you earn automatically gets taxed (etc) ?

- What are examples of "cheap" prices?

- Youhave to post an image of yourself on your profile right?

- Haveyou ever made any logos, I've seen a lot of businesses asking for logos to be made...?


Any other advice / tips for me?


Thanks !
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by MiaNova)
Didn't even know it was anon lol. 😲

Some more Q's 😌

- Any money you earn automatically gets taxed (etc) ?

- What are examples of "cheap" prices?

- Youhave to post an image of yourself on your profile right?

- Haveyou ever made any logos, I've seen a lot of businesses asking for logos to be made...?


Any other advice / tips for me?


Thanks !
- No, your money will not get automatically taxed. You will need to register for self-assessment, and submit a tax return each year. This is confusing at first, but it gets easier - particularly as PPH give you a balance sheet each month, so you don't really have to do anything. Of course, it's quite unlikely that you will earn enough to get taxed at all if you're studying at the same time, but earnings still need to be declared, or you could get in trouble later on.

- On PPH, the lowest amount you can bid for a job is £7. On jobs where a buyer has given a price, you can undercut by a certain amount. So, when I started, I was proofreading 5,000 words for £7. Absolutely ridiculous, but it gave me my first review.

- You have to post an image, but it doesn't have to be of you. I used my graduation photo, but there are lots of people with company logos, other kinds of photos etc. I find that people do prefer natural looking images. A lot of the people who hire are companies needing a little extra help, so they want your profile to look as professional as possible.

- Nope, I don't work with design at all, so I've never done that kind of project. Writing, editing and proofreading (and occasionally audio transcription if the money's right, but I hate it) are what I do. If you're going to be doing things like that, they want it to be high end, and not something they could have just created themselves. Designers have to have a passion and talent for what they do, to stand out. I hired someone to do a logo for my other business once, and she just used an auto logo programme online.. which was obvious.

One thing I would say is that it might sound really great, but it can take a long long time to get your first job. I was lucky, in that I got mine quite quickly, but then when my partner was starting it was taking him a long time. In the end, I gave him some of my work to do so I could give him some reviews to get him started haha. It worked! Ironically though he doesn't do much freelancing anymore, as we own another business together, so he mostly works on that. Still from home, though.

I would also suggest being careful that it doesn't interfere with your academics. Clients usually want to set deadlines, and so will your course, so you have to be careful not to take too much on, or something will suffer. I ended up pretty much using my 3 years at uni to build a career. I'm not using my degree now, but I still wanted to get top marks on it. I used all of my spare time at uni to start building my freelance name, and it was hard work, but worth it.

Freelancing can be an absolutely fantastic career, but you have to work incredibly hard to get up to the top, and there is also quite a lot of sheer luck involved at the start. You won't just be able to go on and get a job straight away, but so long as you're aware of that, and you're willing to put the time in, you might be able to do it . People are often amazed that I can get paid the amount that I do for essentially sitting on my bum - and that is definitely the case now, but all of the hard work to get my name out that came before, in the five years where I was earning very very little, and gradually burning through my savings and hoping I could turn things round before they ran out completely!

There are other freelance sites too that I use - freelancer.com and upwork.com - both of which I have strong profiles on. These might be worth you taking a look at, too.
Last edited by xoxAngel_Kxox; 4 weeks ago
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MiaNova
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
- No, your money will not get automatically taxed. You will need to register for self-assessment, and submit a tax return each year. This is confusing at first, but it gets easier - particularly as PPH give you a balance sheet each month, so you don't really have to do anything. Of course, it's quite unlikely that you will earn enough to get taxed at all if you're studying at the same time, but earnings still need to be declared, or you could get in trouble later on.

- On PPH, the lowest amount you can bid for a job is £7. On jobs where a buyer has given a price, you can undercut by a certain amount. So, when I started, I was proofreading 5,000 words for £7. Absolutely ridiculous, but it gave me my first review.

- You have to post an image, but it doesn't have to be of you. I used my graduation photo, but there are lots of people with company logos, other kinds of photos etc. I find that people do prefer natural looking images. A lot of the people who hire are companies needing a little extra help, so they want your profile to look as professional as possible.

- Nope, I don't work with design at all, so I've never done that kind of project. Writing, editing and proofreading (and occasionally audio transcription if the money's right, but I hate it) are what I do. If you're going to be doing things like that, they want it to be high end, and not something they could have just created themselves. Designers have to have a passion and talent for what they do, to stand out. I hired someone to do a logo for my other business once, and she just used an auto logo programme online.. which was obvious.

One thing I would say is that it might sound really great, but it can take a long long time to get your first job. I was lucky, in that I got mine quite quickly, but then when my partner was starting it was taking him a long time. In the end, I gave him some of my work to do so I could give him some reviews to get him started haha. It worked! Ironically though he doesn't do much freelancing anymore, as we own another business together, so he mostly works on that. Still from home, though.

I would also suggest being careful that it doesn't interfere with your academics. Clients usually want to set deadlines, and so will your course, so you have to be careful not to take too much on, or something will suffer. I ended up pretty much using my 3 years at uni to build a career. I'm not using my degree now, but I still wanted to get top marks on it. I used all of my spare time at uni to start building my freelance name, and it was hard work, but worth it.

Freelancing can be an absolutely fantastic career, but you have to work incredibly hard to get up to the top, and there is also quite a lot of sheer luck involved at the start. You won't just be able to go on and get a job straight away, but so long as you're aware of that, and you're willing to put the time in, you might be able to do it . People are often amazed that I can get paid the amount that I do for essentially sitting on my bum - and that is definitely the case now, but all of the hard work to get my name out that came before, in the five years where I was earning very very little, and gradually burning through my savings and hoping I could turn things round before they ran out completely!

There are other freelance sites too that I use - freelancer.com and upwork.com - both of which I have strong profiles on. These might be worth you taking a look at, too.
Thank you!
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MiaNova
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
- No, your money will not get automatically taxed. You will need to register for self-assessment, and submit a tax return each year. This is confusing at first, but it gets easier - particularly as PPH give you a balance sheet each month, so you don't really have to do anything. Of course, it's quite unlikely that you will earn enough to get taxed at all if you're studying at the same time, but earnings still need to be declared, or you could get in trouble later on.

- On PPH, the lowest amount you can bid for a job is £7. On jobs where a buyer has given a price, you can undercut by a certain amount. So, when I started, I was proofreading 5,000 words for £7. Absolutely ridiculous, but it gave me my first review.

- You have to post an image, but it doesn't have to be of you. I used my graduation photo, but there are lots of people with company logos, other kinds of photos etc. I find that people do prefer natural looking images. A lot of the people who hire are companies needing a little extra help, so they want your profile to look as professional as possible.

- Nope, I don't work with design at all, so I've never done that kind of project. Writing, editing and proofreading (and occasionally audio transcription if the money's right, but I hate it) are what I do. If you're going to be doing things like that, they want it to be high end, and not something they could have just created themselves. Designers have to have a passion and talent for what they do, to stand out. I hired someone to do a logo for my other business once, and she just used an auto logo programme online.. which was obvious.

One thing I would say is that it might sound really great, but it can take a long long time to get your first job. I was lucky, in that I got mine quite quickly, but then when my partner was starting it was taking him a long time. In the end, I gave him some of my work to do so I could give him some reviews to get him started haha. It worked! Ironically though he doesn't do much freelancing anymore, as we own another business together, so he mostly works on that. Still from home, though.

I would also suggest being careful that it doesn't interfere with your academics. Clients usually want to set deadlines, and so will your course, so you have to be careful not to take too much on, or something will suffer. I ended up pretty much using my 3 years at uni to build a career. I'm not using my degree now, but I still wanted to get top marks on it. I used all of my spare time at uni to start building my freelance name, and it was hard work, but worth it.

Freelancing can be an absolutely fantastic career, but you have to work incredibly hard to get up to the top, and there is also quite a lot of sheer luck involved at the start. You won't just be able to go on and get a job straight away, but so long as you're aware of that, and you're willing to put the time in, you might be able to do it . People are often amazed that I can get paid the amount that I do for essentially sitting on my bum - and that is definitely the case now, but all of the hard work to get my name out that came before, in the five years where I was earning very very little, and gradually burning through my savings and hoping I could turn things round before they ran out completely!

There are other freelance sites too that I use - freelancer.com and upwork.com - both of which I have strong profiles on. These might be worth you taking a look at, too.
Out of all 3 (PPH, freelancer & Upwork), which one do you think is the best (especially for a beginner)?

Also, how much does PPH tax you / take from your earnings, I know Upwork at first takes 20%..? Honestly I'm leaning towards PPH more.

Thanks!
Last edited by MiaNova; 4 weeks ago
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by MiaNova)
Out of all 3 (PPH, freelancer & Upwork), which one do you think is the best (especially for a beginner)?

Also, how much does PPH tax you / take from your earnings, I know Upwork at first takes 20%..? Honestly I'm leaning towards PPH more.

Thanks!
They all have their pros and cons. I don't pretend to know a huge amount about the other two as I only use them very very rarely. I think PPH is the best platform.

Don't be confused about the service fee - that's not tax. PeoplePerHour charge you a service fee, depending on how much you've earned with a client. So it'll start at 20% per transaction (with a minimum per invoice of £3) and when you've earned more than a certain amount (a few thousand) with a client, it goes down to 3.5%, which is what I'm now on for the couple of long term clients I still have on there. Your earnings will be taxed again at the end of each tax year, which is 20% if you're above the tax threshold but still in the lowest tier. But, only your profits are taxed, and you can claim the website service fee as a business expense - along with other things like printers, paper and even laptops and phones depending what your actual role entails. So financially it's not as bad as it sounds.
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Jasmo
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
I work as a writer, editor and proofreader, so take on jobs under those categories. You don't need specific qualifications to sign up, but seeing as you have to write a proposal when you apply for each job, it helps if you do have at least experience if not qualifications. I got around this at the beginning by offering very, very low prices just to get some decent reviews under my belt. I have more than 1,000 reviews now, so if I fancy a job, all I need to do is post a proposal and I'll usually get it. I rarely send proposals though, as I have two major clients who usually have enough work to keep me busy - but if I need some extra cash for something, or I'm bored, I'll sometimes do some little projects too.
hello
please hot to contact you please, I have got some assignments that I need to proofread

Thanks
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by Jasmo)
hello
please hot to contact you please, I have got some assignments that I need to proofread

Thanks
Hello,

Thanks for your interest but I won't be accepting any work via this thread as I don't want TSR to believe I'm advertising - as I'm not. If you do want a proofreader, PeoplePerHour have lots .
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