How a person in HK can be away from the protests Watch

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I am from HK, where frequent marches and riots happen in various districts, and there is also a class strike on 2nd September, the day the city is back to school. However, there are ways in which I can be away from the protests, so I can remain in a safe life.
1. Have a curfew after 6:30 pm, unless necessary, and be accompanied by an adult at those times. The protests are often at its peak in the evening, so a curfew is the first step to keep away from the protests. People of my age are most likely to be hit and/or arrested, so should I have to go out, I will leave for home between 5:30 pm and 6:00 pm, and make sure that I am at home by 6:30 pm, so that I am in a safe place all of the time. If I need to go out after 6:30 pm, I will go out with my parents.
2. Do not post, or even look at Lennon walls. These walls are mainly for people with strong political views to paste their comments on, but currently it is quite secure not to have a political opinion. I do not have one as I believe that God knows what is the best for Hong Kong, so I will just pray in the quietest places which people are hard to find, instead of looking at others' political opinions. I really hope that God's kingdom and righteousness lands on HK.
3. Spend more time on taking transport, especially when heading to the airport. For example, to catch a flight leaving at 00:35, which I need to do next week, I will leave home at 8:00 pm, get a taxi to the Kowloon station and take the Airport Express train to the airport, so that I will be at the airport by 9:15 pm, for ample time to complete the additional security checks.
4. Never participate in a class strike. These events often start between 7:30 am and 8:00 am, so I will be at school by 7:30 am on the first day in order to be away from the strike.
Any more suggestions for me?
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AngeryPenguin
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You're probably not going to get many responses here, because most people here are from the UK and have zero experience with violent protests.

The closest is the 2011 London riots, and even then most people are too young to remember and not from London. I'm not equating the 2011 riots to what is happening in HK right now - the 2011 riots were a far smaller scale, popular opinion was always strongly against them, and (although sparked by the African-American community's fury over the shooting of Mark Duggan) they were almost entirely characterised by looting rather than political demands. They are just the largest recent mass violence in the UK.

A big thing perhaps is avoiding crowds, especially during times when clashes are more likely. Whether or not the crowds are political - it's about keeping mobile. Some police tactics (such as kettling) can get bystanders trapped. Panics etc are more likely in crowds.

Be aware of alternative transport routes. If there is a clash that affects an underground train line, for instance, you'd want to be able to quickly ditch that train and get a different one instead, in order to avoid potential trouble.

Other than that, maybe read into how the journalists handle protests. How to disentangle yourself from a crowd if you somehow end up getting pushed into it, etc.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by AngeryPenguin)
You're probably not going to get many responses here, because most people here are from the UK and have zero experience with violent protests.

The closest is the 2011 London riots, and even then most people are too young to remember and not from London. I'm not equating the 2011 riots to what is happening in HK right now - the 2011 riots were a far smaller scale, popular opinion was always strongly against them, and (although sparked by the African-American community's fury over the shooting of Mark Duggan) they were almost entirely characterised by looting rather than political demands. They are just the largest recent mass violence in the UK.

A big thing perhaps is avoiding crowds, especially during times when clashes are more likely. Whether or not the crowds are political - it's about keeping mobile. Some police tactics (such as kettling) can get bystanders trapped. Panics etc are more likely in crowds.

Be aware of alternative transport routes. If there is a clash that affects an underground train line, for instance, you'd want to be able to quickly ditch that train and get a different one instead, in order to avoid potential trouble.

Other than that, maybe read into how the journalists handle protests. How to disentangle yourself from a crowd if you somehow end up getting pushed into it, etc.
I would also mention the mass student riots when Micheal Gove and the Conservative party decided to hike up tuition fees changing the lives of millions upon millions for generations hence. Micheal Gove, the millionaire, who interestingly had his university for free, hiked up the repayment and debts, at a time in society when fewer and fewer can even afford a house.
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Bang Outta Order
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(Original post by AngeryPenguin)
You're probably not going to get many responses here, because most people here are from the UK and have zero experience with violent protests.

The closest is the 2011 London riots, and even then most people are too young to remember and not from London. I'm not equating the 2011 riots to what is happening in HK right now - the 2011 riots were a far smaller scale, popular opinion was always strongly against them, and (although sparked by the African-American community's fury over the shooting of Mark Duggan) they were almost entirely characterised by looting rather than political demands. They are just the largest recent mass violence in the UK.

A big thing perhaps is avoiding crowds, especially during times when clashes are more likely. Whether or not the crowds are political - it's about keeping mobile. Some police tactics (such as kettling) can get bystanders trapped. Panics etc are more likely in crowds.

Be aware of alternative transport routes. If there is a clash that affects an underground train line, for instance, you'd want to be able to quickly ditch that train and get a different one instead, in order to avoid potential trouble.

Other than that, maybe read into how the journalists handle protests. How to disentangle yourself from a crowd if you somehow end up getting pushed into it, etc.
Lmao African American?!



This is UK. We're not American! Americans don't even know who duggan is!!! How did black Brits become African American!? This is when politically correct pseudo leftism shows how failed of a concept it is. When they get basic things about ethnicity and race w r o n g.
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